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2018-2019 College Catalog

About The CatalogLast updated: February 11, 2019

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About The CollegeLast updated: February 11, 2019

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, affiliated with The Christ Hospital Health Network for over a century, is a regionally accredited, private institution of higher learning. Dedicated to delivering the highest quality healthcare education, TCCNHS graduates have the knowledge and skills they need to make a difference. We educate tomorrow’s healthcare leaders.

History - Vision - Mission

History

The Christ Hospital School of Nursing, predecessor to The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, was born in a tradition of caring. In 1888, a group of local citizens, led by soap maker James N. Gamble, invited Ms. Isabella Thoburn to come to Cincinnati. Their expectation was that she would start a program to train deaconesses and missionaries to carry on religious, educational, and philanthropic work to alleviate the appalling poverty that existed in the city. They could not have imagined the impact their invitation would have on our city, then and more than a century later.

Miss Thoburn arrived in late 1888 and found that the Gamble family had provided a house and funds to begin herwork. The endeavor was named The Elizabeth Gamble Deaconess Home Association in honor of Mrs. James Gamble, who had dedicated her life to serving the needy of the city. On that storied day when Ms. Thoburn found a sick woman crying on the street because she had cancer and could not get medical care, the plan of the deaconesses expanded beyond running a soup kitchen and ministering in tenement homes. They opened a ten-bed hospital, named Christ’s Hospital.

Between 1889 and 1901, the Association trained only deaconesses as nurses, but they soon recognized the need for enrolling other qualified young women. By 1901, young women were accepted for training as nurses whether or not they intended to become deaconesses. This paved the way for the formation of The Christ Hospital School of Nursing in 1902. Since its inception, The Christ Hospital School of Nursing has grown both in size and sophistication to meet the changing healthcare needs within the Greater Cincinnati region and the tri-state (Ohio-Indiana-Kentucky).

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, established in 2006, offers programs designed to prepare graduates to work in a broad array of healthcare settings. Discipline-specific studies, grounded in the arts and sciences provide students with the opportunity to develop the necessary skills and competencies to transition into their chosen profession. The College continues in the pursuit of excellence in education which has been at the core of the institution’s mission and history and is aptly stated in its unchanging motto - Summo Commisso Missi, On Highest Mission Sent.

Vision

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be an innovative institution of higher learning providing a distinctive curriculum in nursing and health sciences.

Mission

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, guided by its core values and enriched by a foundation in the Arts and Sciences, prepares individuals both for delivery of healthcare that promotes the well-being of a dynamic society and for life-long learning.

Values and Goals

Core Values

  • Caring: to have respect for every human being and concern for the preservation of human dignity; to accept the diversity of cultures and origins characterizing the global community.
  • Collaboration: to work cooperatively; to achieve common goals.
  • Integrity: to be honest, fair, trustworthy, and genuine; to conduct oneself ethically, legally, and professionally.
  • Excellence: to function at the highest level of performance; to demonstrate commitment to quality outcomes and continuous improvement through evidence-based practice.

Goals

To make its vision a reality and to accomplish its mission The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences promises to:

  • Provide a collaborative learning environment that addresses the individual needs of a diverse student population.
  • Integrate knowledge from the Arts and Sciences and discipline-specific studies to establish a foundation for life-long learning.
  • Employ faculty who demonstrate excellence in education through quality instruction, community service, and scholarly endeavors.
  • Provide an educational experience grounded in the institution’s core values that prepares graduates to participate responsibly in a dynamic, diverse society.
  • Provide curricular offerings relevant to current market demands and healthcare needs.
  • Ensure academic excellence through on-going assessment and evaluation.

Institutional Learning Outcomes

As a result of their educational experiences at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, students will:

  • Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  • Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Student learning outcomes are also clearly stated for the academic programs that are offered at the college. Students should refer to the program handbook for their respective degree program.

College Conceptual Framework

The curriculum provides an integrated approach to holistic learning that prepares students to enter the health professions, the community, and the world as competent, well-rounded, critically thinking individuals. The following diagram depicts the College’s conceptual framework.

Conceptual Framework Image

Currently the Department of Nursing offers a pre-licensure Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (AAS), a pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), and the Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN) completion program. The academic departments work together to support the overall mission and goals of the College while creating a well-rounded academic experience for students, faculty, and staff.

Supported by a foundation in the arts and sciences and discipline-related studies the College’s conceptual framework is rooted in its mission, purpose, goals, and values.

Technical Standards

Technical standards are combinations of cognitive, behavioral/social, and physical abilities required to acquire the knowledge and skills needed for the roles associated with the College’s program(s). In addition to being essential to the successful completion of the requirements of a degree, these skills and functions are necessary to ensure the health and safety of patients, students, faculty, and other health care providers. Qualified applicants are expected to meet all admissions criteria and matriculating students are expected to meet all progression criteria, as well as these technical standards.

Because curricula leading to healthcare related degrees at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (TCCNHS) require students to engage in diverse and complex experiences, the College has identified specified technical standards critical to the success of students. Variations of these functions may be addressed in program or course specific information. If the capacity to perform these technical standards with or without reasonable accommodations results in the inability to meet student learning outcomes, the student may be at risk of not successfully completing the course and/or program.

Cognitive

Intellectual and conceptual ability to think critically in order to make decisions, which includes measuring, calculating, reasoning, analyzing, prioritizing and synthesizing data.

Behavioral/Social

  • Capacity to demonstrate ethical behavior, including student honor codes, as well as applicable laws and regulations governing healthcare professions.
  • Ability to:
    1. Function safely under stress and adapt to changing situations.
    2. Relate to individuals and groups with honesty, integrity and non-discrimination.
    3. Communicate, including ability to ask questions and receive answers with accuracy, participate in team discussions, and demonstrate computer literacy.
    4. Record information.
    5. Master written and spoken English.

Physical

  • Motor and psychomotor function including gross and fine motor skills, physical endurance, strength, stamina and mobility to carry out professional processes.
  • Ability to gather data including but not limited to information conveyed through lecture, group seminar, small group activities, written documents, computer-information systems, and physical demonstrations
  • Ability to identify information presented in images from paper, videos, and slides.

The information above is intended as guidance and not as hard rules. Accommodation requests by students, even those related to technical standards, will be analyzed and determined on a case-by-case basis, and such accommodations will be granted when the College determines it is reasonable to do so.

College Organizational Structure

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is a non-profit corporation. The affiliate hospital, The Christ Hospital, is the Sole Member of TCCNHS. The oversight for all institutional, business, and academic practices emanates from TCCNHS’ Board of Directors. The President of the College reports directly to the Board and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of the institution.

An organizational chart can be found here: https://www.thechristcollege.edu/img/content/tcc-organizational-chart-7-1-2018.pdf

Board of Directors

  • Cathy M. Hamblen, BSN, RN, Chair
  • Hon. Yvonne G. Washington, Vice Chair
  • Susan D. Gilster, PhD, RN, Secretary
  • Thomas M. Broderick, MD
  • Jose Luis Chavez, MD
  • Hon. Victoria B. Gluckman
  • Roderick D. Hinton
  • James S. Wendel, MD
  • Gail E. Kist-Kline, PhD, President, The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (Ex-Officio Member)
  • Julie A. Holt, Vice President, Chief Nursing Officer, The Christ Hospital (Ex-Officio Member)
  • Theodore M. Scherpenberg, Finance Executive Director—Controller, The Christ Hospital/The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (Ex-Officio Member)

Compliance

Civil Rights Compliance

Qualified applicants will be considered for admission to The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences without regard to race, sex, creed, nationality, age, or marital status.

Non-Discriminatory Statement

Updated 7/27/16; Updated 10/19/16; 12/13/17

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is committed to a policy of non-discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, citizenship, religion, ethnicity, age, gender, gender identity, genetics, marital status, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, military or veteran status, disability, or any other status protected by local, state or federal law (collectively, “protected statuses”) in the administration of its educational, recruitment, and admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; and athletic or other College-administered programs. All institutional processes and policies are in compliance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations related to discrimination. The following people have been designated to handle specific inquiries regarding specific non-discrimination policies:

For inquiries related to disabilities, contact:

Fay Silverman, Director of Student Success Main College Building Office 132. (513) 585-2959. Fay.Silverman@TheChristCollege.edu

For inquiries related to Title IX/Sexual Assault and all other discrimination contact:

Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean of Compliance/Title IX Coordinator. Office: Medical Office Building Office 306. (513) 585-2055. Maureen.Schwab@TheChristCollege.edu

Inquiries regarding Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 can also be made to the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR). OCR can be contacted by visiting http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html or by calling 1-800-421-3481.

Disability Compliance

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, does not restrict admission of any individual solely by reason of his or her disability.

Right of Privacy

For information pertaining to students’ rights to privacy, please refer to the College Catalog section on FERPA.

Accreditation

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is accredited, approved, and authorized by several agencies and organizations. Below is a listing of these agencies and organizations. Please visit the College’s website www.thechristcollege.edu for full verification.

Regionally accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC). Accreditation is limited to the Associate Degree in Nursing and the RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.

The Higher Learning Commission

230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411 Phone: 800.621.7440 / 312.263.0456 Fax: 312.263.7462 www.hlcommission.org

The baccalaureate program at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, Phone: (202) 887-6791

The Associate of Applied Science in Nursing program is nationally accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN)

3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850 Atlanta, Georgia 30326 Phone: 404.975.5000 Fax: 404.975.5020 http://www.acennursing.org

Approved by the Ohio Board of Nursing to conduct nursing education programs (AAS and BSN degrees) leading to initial licensure to practice nursing as a Registered Nurse.

Authorized by the Ohio Department of Higher Education (formerly, Ohio Board of Regents) to award the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN).

Approved by the State Approving Agency for Veterans’ Training.

Library Services

Vision

The James N. Gamble Library will connect people to the most relevant knowledge-based information.

Mission

The James N. Gamble Library will provide members of The Christ Hospital Health Network community with timely, authoritative and accurate library and information services to advance excellence in education, research, and patient care.

  • Circulating book and journal collection
  • Article reprints via e-mail, fax, interdepartmental mail, or pick-up at Library
  • ILL services for books and journal articles not in the Library’s collection
  • Bibliographic literature search services
  • Table of contents surveys
  • Reference assistance
  • Training on subscription search databases and electronic resources
  • Assistance with creating online journal clubs

Location and Contact Information

The Christ Hospital, 1 North
Phone: (513) 585-2737, Fax: (513) 585-4353
E-Mail: TCH_Library@TheChristHospital.com

Hours of Operation

Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: Closed

Staff

Regina Hartman, Library Manager Diana Osborne, Library Assistant Jennifer Pettigrew, E-Resources Librarian Jennifer Steinhardt, Archivist

Bookstore

Books for The Christ College can be easily purchased at Joseph-Beth Booksellers.

Location and Contact Information

2139 Auburn Avenue, Cincinnati Ohio 45219 (The Christ Hospital Gift Shop) Phone: 513-585-0868

For your convenience and in compliance with regulatory standards, a book list is supplied for all courses with book titles and ISBN numbers prior to class registration each semester. We strongly recommend you shop through Joseph-Beth Booksellers. Please be advised that if you shop through another online vendor, The Christ College cannot make any guarantees to assist you in resolving your book orders.

If you should discover there are not enough available books at the bookstore or there is something incorrectly listed, please contact a Joseph-Beth Booksellers’ associate or manager. They can assist you in resolving your book orders.

Concerns or questions about book orders should first be directed to the appropriate faculty member or Joseph-Beth Booksellers’ staff. Unresolved issues should be directed to the appropriate Associate Dean.

Financial Aid Book Voucher Policy

The College, together with Joseph-Beth Booksellers, has developed the following guidelines and procedures for students who wish to use their anticipated financial aid refund to purchase required and recommended books and supplies.

Eligible students may only receive a book voucher at the Admission and Financial Aid Office.

To be eligible for a College Book Voucher, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Have a valid FAFSA on file with the College.
  2. Have completed verification process with the financial aid office if applicable.
  3. Have signed a master promissory note (MPN) for Direct Student Loans if applicable.
  4. Have a completed financial aid file.
  5. Be in good standing of Academic and Financial Aid SAP policies.
  6. Have registered for a minimum of 6 credit hours.
  7. Have financial aid in excess of tuition charges for the semester.
  8. Have no outstanding balances owed to the College for the current or previous semesters.

Book Voucher Guidelines

  1. Only one book voucher per student.
  2. Book vouchers are only available for fall, spring and summer semesters.
  3. Book vouchers expire at close of business on the final day of the 100% refund period.
  4. No book vouchers will be given after the final day of the 100% refund period.
  5. Can receive up to $1000 in a book voucher depending on individual eligibility. A minimum of $100 must be available in a pending refund to process a book voucher.
  6. Students are not permitted to purchase books or supplies for other students.
  7. Only required or recommended books and supplies for the currently enrolled semester will be permitted.
  8. Book vouchers must be used at the Joseph-Beth at Christ Hospital store only to purchase required or recommended books and supplies.
  9. At time of purchase, student must show Joseph-Beth Booksellers your College ID badge or photo ID.
  10. Only the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid or approved college designee is authorized to sign the TCCNHS Book Voucher Form.

Book Voucher Process

  1. Book Voucher Forms are available at the Financial Aid Office beginning one week prior to the start of the semester or at designated dates as determined by TCCNHS in conjunction with Joseph-Beth.
  2. Book voucher requests will not be processed by email or phone. Requests must be made in person at the Financial Aid Office.
  3. A book and supplies fee will be charged to the student account for the amount invoiced by Joseph-Beth Booksellers.
  4. The completed book voucher should be considered as cash and if a student misplaces the voucher or loses the voucher, another voucher will not be issued.
  5. For your first purchase at Joseph-Beth at the Christ Hospital store, you will be required to give them your Financial Aid voucher. They will set up an account in your name and, in return, provide you with a Special Payment Card with the allotted financial aid loaded on the card. Each time you purchase, you will need to pay with this card. This is considered cash and if a student misplaces the Payment Card, another voucher will not be issued.
  6. The Joseph-Beth Payment Card can only be used at Joseph-Beth at Christ Hospital and the student must present their College ID or photo ID at the time of purchase.
  7. Joseph-Beth Booksellers will reconcile with TCCNHS approximately 30 days after the start of the semesters. Approved book vouchers will expire the day after the 100% tuition refund schedule of the College.

Food Services

There are several dining venues available to students that are open throughout the day and evening.

  • Bistro 1889-Monday through Friday (Located in the Hospital; Closed on Holidays)
  • Starbucks-Monday through Sunday (Located in the Hospital)
  • Au Bon Pain-Monday through Sunday (Located in the Hospital)
  • Vending Machines-Vending machines with snacks and beverages in the Hospital and in the College’s Student Lounge accessible 24-hours a day.

A refrigerator, microwave, and coffee machine are located in the College’s Student Lounge.

Academic CalendarLast updated: February 11, 2019

Academic InformationLast updated: February 11, 2019

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Department of Health Sciences

Added 11/15/16

The Department of Health Sciences has two Divisions, Allied Health and Arts and Sciences. The degrees offered within the department are an Associate of Science in General Studies and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration.

Purpose

The purpose of the Health Sciences is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences. Students will acquire a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the person, environment and health. The health science graduate will be a life-long learner who models ethical behavior, integrity and excellence. Earning a health science degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, graduates will be equipped to participate in the healthcare arena as caring professionals engaging in critical decision making, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration.

Philosophy

A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.

The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities, and institutions. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Health Sciences graduates engage in assessment of both the environment and people to identify opportunities to promote, maintain, or restore health.

Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person, including physical, mental and social well-being. A person’s state of health is influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and may be affected by prevention and treatment strategies.

Framework

Visual Reference of Health Sciences conceptual framework

Horizontal Threads for Health Sciences

For the Health Sciences, person, environment and_ health_ constitute horizontal threads, which are those integrated concepts presented early, strengthened through repeated exposure and application, and woven throughout the curriculum for Health Science programs.

Vertical Threads for Health Sciences

Caring, intellectual inquiry, ethical behavior, critical decision making, and collaboration comprise the vertical threads. These concepts and skills are arranged to build upon one another in alignment with a general sequence of learning. Scaffolded through the curriculum for Health Science programs, vertical threads guide the student’s progression toward proficiency.

Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where individual choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected.

Intellectual Inquiry is a persistent sense of curiosity that informs both learning and practice, which stimulates visionary thinking. Intellectual inquiry invites the exploration of possibilities, allowing for creativity and innovation.

Ethical Behaviors are characterized by conduct within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks; commitment to standards of professional practice; and accountability for one’s own actions.

Critical Decision Making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate evidence-based conclusions.

Collaboration is working together with open professional communication to plan, make decisions, set goals and implement strategies. Collaboration requires consideration of need, priorities and preferences, available resources, shared accountability, and mutual respect.

Division of Allied Health Programs

The Division of Allied Health serves to educate health care professionals in the Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (HCA) program. Specific concentration tracks have been developed to assist a student with degree completion utilizing prior education. The concentration tracks for degree completion include Medical Assistant to HCA; Paramedic to HCA; Community Paramedic to HCA; Registered Nurse to HCA; Licensed Practical Nurse to HCA; and BSN and BS in HCA dual degree.

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program provides a course of study that integrates concepts from liberal arts and sciences with a healthcare curriculum emphasizing academic excellence with opportunities for specialization. The promotion of critical decision making skills, ethical behaviors and intellectual inquiry along with a business focus prepares graduates with the foundational knowledge needed to enter a dynamic healthcare environment as collaborative, caring leaders. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments. The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program makes it possible for graduates to lead and manage healthcare staff and facilities.

Program Outcomes

  1. Apply theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts and sciences and health sciences to collaborative, caring management approaches based on evidence.
  2. Build collaborative teams that successfully address complex challenges to healthcare.
  3. Demonstrate effective professional, ethical communication, utilizing a variety of modalities, to improve healthcare delivery.
  4. Assess organizational processes to determine opportunities and methods for improvement.
  5. Analyze the impact of health care policy and regulatory mandates on health care management.
  6. Demonstrate leadership roles to manage healthcare organizations.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • 30 Hours of upper division (300-400 level) courses
  • 50% of major taken through TCCNHS
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
ACCT 210 Financial Accounting 3
ACCT 220 Managerial Accounting 3
BUSM 201 Principles of Management 3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 3
FIN 201 Principles of Finance 3
HCA 101 Medical Terminology 3
HCA 210 Introduction to Integrated Health Care Systems 3
HCA 310 Transformational Management in Health Care 3
HCA 320 Information Systems for Evidence-based Management 3
HCA330 Human Resource Management 3
HCA 340 Marketing Techniques in Health Care 3
HCA 350 Financial Management of Health Care Intuitions 3
HCA 360 Health Care Law 3
HCA 390 HCA Professional Development 1
HCA 410 Health Care Policy 3
HCA 415 Ethical Issues in Health Care 3
HCA 420 Health Care Quality & Performance Excellence 3
HCA 430 Health Care Strategic Planning 3
HCA 435 Social Determinants of Community Health 3
HCA 440 Economic Applications for Operational Excellence 3
HCA 450 Administrative Leadership Capstone Project OR
or 3
HCA 460 HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG205 Composition for Practical Communication 3
or 3
COM 315 Practical Communication 3
COM 101 Communication Elective* 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
SOPS101 Introduction to Social Psychology
or 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation* 12

Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity* 6

Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences* 6

Concentration/Unrestricted Electives* 18-20

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration Concentration Tracks

Students who hold certificates or degrees in the health care fields listed below are eligible to transfer a specific number of credits hours into the HCA program based upon their specific Certificate/Degree. Other certificates or degrees may also qualify. Please call the Admission Office at 513-585-2394 if your certificate or degree is not listed.

Certificates/ Degrees Concentration Transfer Credit Major Transfer Credit Credits Transferred
Paramedic 20 Credits None 20*
Community Paramedic 20 Credits HCA 101 3 26*
HCA 435 3
Medical Assistant 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
Radiology Technician 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
LPN 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
Associate or Diploma RN 20 Credits HCA 101 3 26*
HCA 320 3

* In addition, General Education Requirements and Major Requirements may transfer based on prior courses completed at an accredited institution. A minimum of 30 Major Requirement credits must be completed at the College.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Health Care Administration Dual Degree

Edited 5/9/17

BSN Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
NUR 220 Health Assessment 4
NUR 297 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221 Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II 6
NUR 312 Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 4
NUR 313 Concepts in Population Health 2
NUR 398 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410 Clinical Intensive 6
NUR 412 Clinical Intensive 6
NUR 497 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414 Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416 Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2

HCA Major Requirements

HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
CHEM 105 Introduction to Chemistry 4
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
Humanities Elective* 3
PSY 110 Lifespan Development 3
PSY 210 Concepts of Behavior Change 3
SOPS 101 Introduction to Social Psychology 3
or
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
IS 200 Service Learning in Our Community 1
FYE 102 First Year Experience 2

Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours

Graduation Requirements

  • 168 Total credits
  • 50% of each major taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Division of Arts and Sciences

Updated 4/16/18

Through engaging students in the Arts and Sciences, the purpose of the Division of Arts and Sciences is to build upon the intellectual, social, and emotional foundation of students by developing a commitment to life-long learning, increasing their social and global consciousness, and their academic and professional competencies, and building on their understanding of what it means to be a knowledgeable and responsible citizen.

The Division of Arts and Sciences delivers the core general education requirements for college and academic programs.

Students completing the Arts and Sciences experience will be able to:

  • Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  • Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Philosophy

The Arts and Sciences curriculum at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences serves to develop within students certain intellectual and cognitive capacities, habits of mind and character, values, moral awareness, integrative abilities in connecting bodies of knowledge, and qualities necessary for productive citizenship in an open and vibrant democracy.

Intellectual and Cognitive Capacities

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is geared to develop in students the capacities for critical thinking, productive and open dialogue, the ability to proactively solve problems and embrace the challenges of the world around them, and a strong internal focus of control so they are creators, not victims of circumstance or fortune.

Habits

The Arts and Sciences curriculum aims to develop habits of diligence, working smart, seeking knowledge, asking and answering questions, and life-long learning. The Arts and Sciences faculty strive to foster study skills, analytical tools for engaging technology in learning, an appreciation for a variety of learning environments and teaching styles, responsibility for students’ own education, habits of collaborative learning and action, and habits of self-reflection and assessment.

Connecting and Integrating

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is designed to enable students to connect and integrate knowledge among the arts and sciences and the health sciences, in the belief that together the arts and sciences provide comprehensive insight into our world and the human condition.

Values and Moral Development

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe education entails moral development and the examination of values, including the development of integrity, the ability to work with others, and to both generously consider and critically examine the thoughts, goals, and values of others as well as one’s own.

Citizenship

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe that becoming keenly aware of and exercising their own intellectual capacities and developing their interests in the subject matter of the arts and sciences enables individuals to live fuller and more fulfilled human lives. Moreover, the development of these capacities and habits are also crucial to producing well-informed and capable citizens who can participate productively in a liberal democracy, with openness and awareness of others outside one’s own world, with an understanding of the past in order to build a fair, opportune, and sustainable future, and with appreciation of how small our world is and how, through its interconnections, local action affects the global environment.

Program of Study

Associate of Science in General Studies

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Associate of Science General Studies

Added 11/15/16

The Associate of Science degree is intended for students planning to attend a college or university to obtain a bachelor’s degree in a science major or who wish to obtain a 2-year associate degree. The Associate of Science Degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Students may transfer in general education courses or select Arts and Sciences courses at the College to meet the criteria. Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits at TCCNHS.

Program Outcomes

Updated 4/16/18

  1. Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  2. Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  3. Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  4. Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  5. Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Graduation Requirements

General Education Requirements

Oral & Written Communication (9 credit hours)

  • ENG 101 English Composition (3 credits)
  • Oral & Written Communication Electives* (6 credits)

Math & Data Analysis (6 credit hours)

  • MAT 105 College Algebra (3 credits)
  • STAT 201 Statistics (3 credits)

Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation (12 credit hours)

  • Natural Science, Technology, & Innovation Electives* (12 credits)

Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity (3 credit hours)

  • Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity Elective* (3 credits)

Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 credit hours)

  • Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives* (6 credits)

First Year Experience (2 credit hours)

  • FYE 102 First Year Experience (2 credits)

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Unrestricted/Free Elective (22-24 credit hours)*

Choose electives to lead to the minimum total of 60 hours required for graduation. *Choose from approved courses listed on degree audit

  • 60 Total credits
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS

Department of Nursing

The purpose of the Department of Nursing is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the Arts and Sciences. Graduates who earn a nursing degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be caring, professional nurses engaging in critical thinking, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration. Leadership provided by the graduate will promote high quality care for a dynamic, diverse society in any setting. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments and healthcare informatics. The nursing graduate from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be a life-long learner who models integrity and excellence in professional nursing practice.

Philosophy

The faculty within the nursing department at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences believe that:

  1. A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.
  2. The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Ongoing assessment by the nurse identifies a person’s adaptive efforts to promote, maintain, or restore health.
  3. Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person. A person’s state of health may be influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and altered by primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention strategies. A person’s position on the health continuum may require nursing intervention.
  4. Nursing is a caring profession concerned with the patient’s responses to health and illness. Nursing is an integral component of the healthcare system. Nurses function collaboratively to address the diverse healthcare needs of patients. Nurses are providers and managers of care and members within the discipline of nursing.
  5. Nursing practice integrates knowledge from the biological, social, and behavioral sciences with nursing theories, research/evidence, and clinical experience. The application of knowledge, as well as the therapeutic use of self through effective communication and intervention is fundamental to nursing.
  6. The nursing process is a comprehensive clinical decision-making strategy. It serves as a framework for providing and managing competent evidence-based care to promote, maintain, or restore the patient’s optimal level of health. This includes support of a dignified death.
  7. Accountability and responsibility are hallmarks of a wide range of professional behaviors requisite to the discipline of nursing. Nurses are accountable to patients, society, and the nursing profession for providing high standards of care and upholding legal and ethical principles. Nurses are responsible for continuing professional development.
  8. In Nursing, the collaborative processes of teaching and learning take place between the teacher and student. Learning is a goal-oriented, integrative process enhanced by individual inquiry, motivation, and self-direction. Learning is facilitated when faculty creates a cooperative, supportive learning environment, encourages knowledge and skill expansion, and guides students in developing competencies. The achievement of desired changes in knowledge, attitudes, skill and behaviors determines the effectiveness of this collaborative effort.

Framework

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Horizontal Threads

Integrated concepts presented at various stages in the curriculum, strengthened through repeated exposure and application and woven throughout the curriculum. For the Department of Nursing, person, environment, health, and nursing constitute the horizontal threads of the nursing curriculum and are defined in the Philosophy of the Nursing Programs.

Vertical Threads (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

Sequential concepts spanning the nursing program, progressive in complexity and increasing in depth throughout the program. For the Department of Nursing, the following concepts and definitions constitute the vertical threads of the nursing curriculum. The vertical threads are not intended to be viewed as solitary concepts. Rather, the concepts are intended to reflect the progressive educational development of the student in acquiring the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and clinical reasoning requisite to the profession.

  1. Caring Interventions: Caring interventions are those nursing behaviors and actions that assist patients in meeting their needs. Caring interventions are based on a knowledge and understanding of the natural sciences, behavioral sciences, nursing theory, nursing research, and past nursing experiences. Caring is the “being with” and “doing for” that assist patients to achieve the desired results. Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where patient choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected. Caring interventions imply implementation of prevention strategies. (Caring, Quality)
  2. Assessment: Assessment is the collection, analysis, and synthesis of relevant data for the purpose of appraising the patient’s health status. Comprehensive assessment provides a holistic view of the patient which includes dimensions of physical, developmental, emotional, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual, and functional status. Assessment involves the orderly collection of information from multiple sources to establish a foundation for provision of nursing care, and includes identification of available resources to meet patient needs. Initial assessment provides a baseline for future comparisons that can be made in order to individualize patient care. Ongoing assessment and reassessment are required to ensure quality and safety in patient care while meeting the patient’s changing needs. (Nursing Process, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Communication, NCLEX Success)
  3. Clinical Decision Making: Clinical decision-making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate clinical judgments. Effective clinical decision making results in finding solutions, individualizing care, and assuring the delivery of accurate, safe care that moves the patient and support person(s) toward positive outcomes. Evidence-based practice and the use of critical thinking/clinical reasoning provide the foundation for appropriate clinical decision making. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Clinical Judgment, Quality, Evidence-based Practice)
  4. Managing Care: Managing care is the efficient, effective use of human, physical, financial, and technological resources to meet patient needs and support organizational outcomes. Effective management is accomplished through the processes of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The nurse, in collaboration with the healthcare team, uses these processes to assist the patient to move toward positive outcomes in a cost efficient manner, to transition within and across healthcare settings, and to access resources. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Leadership, Collaboration, Healthcare Economics)
  5. Collaboration: Collaboration is the shared planning, decision making, problem solving, goal setting, and assumption of responsibilities by those who work together cooperatively, with open professional communication. Collaboration occurs with the patient, significant support person(s), peers, other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. The nurse participates in the team approach to holistic, patient-centered care across healthcare settings. The nurse functions as advocate, liaison, coordinator, and colleague as participants work together to meet patient needs and move the patient toward positive outcomes. Collaboration requires consideration of patient needs, priorities and preferences, available resources and services, shared accountability, and mutual respect. (Collaboration, Care Coordination, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Leadership, Healthcare Economics)
  6. Communication: Communication in nursing is an interactive process through which there is an exchange of information that may occur verbally, non-verbally, in writing, or through information technology. Those who may be included in this process are the nurse, patient, significant support person(s), other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. Effective communication demonstrates caring, compassion, and cultural awareness, and is directed toward promoting positive outcomes and establishing a trusting relationship. Therapeutic communication is an interactive verbal and non-verbal process between the nurse and patient that assists the patient to cope with change, develop more satisfying interpersonal relationships, and integrate new knowledge and skills. (Communication, Collaboration, Caring, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)
  7. Professional Behaviors: Professional behaviors within nursing practice are characterized by a commitment to the profession of nursing. The graduate of a nursing program adheres to standards of professional practice, is accountable for their own actions and behaviors, and practices nursing within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks. Professional behaviors also include a concern for others, as demonstrated by caring, valuing the profession of nursing, and participating in ongoing professional development. (Ethics, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Law)
  8. Teaching and Learning: Teaching and learning processes are used to promote and maintain health and reduce risks, and are implemented in collaboration with the patient, significant support person(s) and other members of the healthcare team. Teaching encompasses the provision of health education to promote and facilitate informed decision making, achieve positive outcomes, and support self-care activities. Integral components of the teaching process include the transmission of information, evaluation of the response to teaching, and modification of teaching based on identified responses. Learning involves the assimilation of information to expand knowledge and change behavior. (Patient Education, Health Promotion, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)

Human Needs (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

  1. Biological

Oxygenation: Ability to transport air to the lungs and provide life-sustaining oxygen to cells (Acid/Base Balance, Cellular Respiration, Gas Exchange. Perfusion)

Circulation: Ability to transport oxygen and nutrients to cells (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Immunity, Inflammation, Clotting, Homeostasis, Metabolism, Perfusion)

Nutrition: All the processes involved in taking in and utilization of nutrients (Nutrition, Metabolism, Functional Ability, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Caregiving, Palliation, Aging)

Fluid and Electrolyte Balance: Ability to maintain the volume and distribution of body fluids and solutes (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Acid/Base Balance)

Elimination: Ability to excrete waste products (Elimination, Functional Ability, Aging)

Hygiene/Skin Integrity: Practices that are conducive to preservation of health and maintenance of unbroken and healthy skin (Mobility, Tissue Integrity, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Elimination)

Sensory/Comfort and Regulation: Ability to perceive, integrate, control, and respond to internal and external cues (Sensory Perception, Pain, Thermoregulation, Intracranial Regulation, Cellular Regulation, Stress, Infection, Safety, Functional Ability)

Cognition: Mental processes needed for knowing, learning, and understanding (Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Activity: Ability to engage in body movement (Functional Ability, Mobility, Aging)

Safety/Protection: Ability to be protected from actual or potential harm (Safety)

Biophysical Development: Orderly and predictable process of growth and differentiation (Development, Culture, Sexuality, Reproduction)

  1. Psychosocial/Spiritual

Mental Health: Ability to cope with or make the best of changing stresses or stimuli (Anxiety, Coping, Mood & Affect. Addiction, Interpersonal Violence, Psychosis, Aging; Caregiving, Palliation)

Sexuality: The sum of physical, functional, and psychological attributes that are expressed by one’s gender identity and sexual behavior (Sexuality, Reproduction, Development, Aging)

Developmental Tasks: Ability to achieve psychosocial or cognitive skills at certain periods in life (Development, Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Social/Cultural Interaction: Ability to engage in shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people (Culture, Ethics, Caring, Family Dynamics)

Spirituality/Religion: Essence of a person’s being and beliefs about the meaning of life (Spirituality; Palliation)

Programs of Study

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (ADN)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN)

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (ABSN)

Registered Nursing to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (See the Division of Allied Health: Programs of Study section of this Catalog for curriculum)

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program 2019. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

The Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Program provides a course of study that integrates concepts from Arts and Sciences into a nursing curriculum emphasizing academic excellence and clinical competence. The promotion of critical thinking skills, professional behaviors and self-directed learning prepares graduates as beginning nurse generalists capable of entering practice in a dynamic healthcare environment. The completion of the Associate Degree of Applied Science (ADN) in Nursing makes it possible for graduates to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination and to pursue more advanced educational pathways.

Program Outcomes:

  1. Implement caring interventions in response to the diverse needs and inherent value of a person;
  2. Utilize ongoing assessment to identify a person’s adaptation to internal and external environment change;
  3. Implement prevention strategies in response to individuals’ positions on the health continuum;
  4. Implement the nursing process as a clinical decision-making strategy to provide and manage collaborative care;
  5. Utilize communications, including information technologies, effectively and appropriately;
  6. Demonstrate professional behaviors related to nursing practice;
  7. utilize effective teaching strategies to provide accurate, relevant health instruction designed to achieve identified learning outcomes; and
  8. Actively participate in the learning process to achieve desired changes in knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors.

Graduation Requirements

  • 71 Total credits
  • 16 credit General Ed. Residency requirement
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 100 Concepts for Nursing Practice 1
NUR 106 NCLEX Success Course I 1
NUR 107 NCLEX Success Course II 1
NUR 110 Foundations of Nursing Practice 6
NUR 150 Nursing Management of Client Needs I 8
NUR 206 NCLEX Success Course III 1
NUR 207 NCLEX Success Course IV 1
NUR 211 Nursing Management of Client Needs II 10
NUR 213 Nursing Management of Client Needs III 5
NUR 215 Transition to Professional Nursing 5
NUR 199* LPN to RN Transition Course 3

*NUR 199 is an LPN-RN transition course. Students who qualify for this course will not take NUR100, NUR106, or NUR121.

General Education Requirements

Course Credits
ENG 101 English Composition 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
or
COM 110
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
SOPS101 Introduction to Sociology 3
or
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
Elective* 3

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN, ABSN, RN-BSN)

Program Outcomes:

  1. Apply appropriate evidence to improve healthcare outcomes.
  2. Utilize healthcare informatics safely and accurately in the delivery of quality care.
  3. Employ critical thinking and clinical reasoning to care for diverse populations.
  4. Lead the healthcare team in solving contemporary issues to improve patient outcomes.
  5. Collaborate with the inter-professional healthcare team to ensure quality and safety.
  6. Demonstrate professionalism in the nursing role.
  7. Apply an understanding of health policy and regulatory environments in patient care.
  8. Pursue life-long learning and service to meet the needs of a dynamic society.

Pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program Description (BSN & ABSN)

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs provide a course of study that has its foundation in the liberal arts and sciences and is an innovative nursing curriculum emphasizing academic excellence and professional leadership through clinical immersion. A distinctive concept-based curriculum integrating service learning prepares students to address the healthcare needs of diverse global communities by promoting population health. Graduates of this program will utilize evidence to promote health and wellness through caring and collaborative strategies incorporating knowledge of regulatory environments, healthcare informatics, and quality improvement. A culture of robust intellectual inquiry will prepare graduates to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination and to pursue life-long learning.

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing

BSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 121 Total credits
  • 50% of coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 220 Health Assessment 4
NUR 297 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221 Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan I 6
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II 6
NUR 312 Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 4
NUR 313 Concepts in Population Health 2
NUR 398 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410 Clinical Intensive I 6
NUR 412 Clinical Intensive II 6
NUR 497 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414 Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416 Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2

General Education Requirements

Course Credits
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
PHI 205 World Religion 3
PSY 110 Lifespan Development 3
PSY 210 Concepts of Behavior Change 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
IS 200 Service Learning in Our Community 1
FYE 102 First Year Experience-Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours 2
Elective* 3

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing

ABSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 70 Total credits
  • 100% of nursing coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
NUR 220A Health Assessment 4
NUR 297A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221A Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305A Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 307A Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309A Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311A Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 312A Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 3
NUR 313A Concepts in Population Health 3
NUR 398A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410A Clinical Intensive I 6
NUR 412A Clinical Intensive II 6
NUR 497A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414A Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416A Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
Nursing Elective 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3

General Education Pre-Requisites Completed Prior to Starting Nursing Coursework:

Number Course Name Credits
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3

**Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing **

The RN-BSN Program is a completion degree program which builds on a foundation of previous nursing education at the associate degree and diploma levels. The RN-BSN course of study integrates Arts and Sciences with nursing science and theory to promote the advancement of professional nursing practice. The program provides a quality contemporary curriculum emphasizing academic excellence related to current trends and issues in healthcare. Graduates of the RN-BSN program are prepared for leadership roles, career enhancement, and life-long learning to improve healthcare outcomes in a dynamic healthcare environment.

Program Outcomes:

  1. Apply theoretical and empirical knowledge from nursing and Arts and Sciences to provide caring interventions based on evidence.
  2. Apply current and emerging clinical technologies and informatics for ethical, clinical-decision making.
  3. Demonstrate effective professional communication, utilizing a variety of modalities, to improve healthcare outcomes.
  4. Participate in inter-professional, evidence-based quality improvement processes for quality, safe, patient-centered care.
  5. Analyze the impact of healthcare policy and regulatory mandates on healthcare outcomes.
  6. Demonstrate leadership roles to manage care and enhance patient outcomes and the nursing profession based on evidence.
  7. Utilize ongoing, comprehensive assessment to provide culturally sensitive care to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across the lifespan.
  8. Practice professional nursing from a holistic, legal, and ethical foundation to enhance patient outcomes.
  9. Demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning, professional growth, and advancement of the nursing profession.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Minimum 36 General Education credits Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Major Requirements
  • General Education Requirements

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 320 Nursing Informatics 3
NUR 335 Introduction to Research & EBP 3
NUR 350 Nursing Theories & Foundational Concepts 3
NUR 365 Legal & Ethical Issues in Nursing 3
NUR 420 Health Care Policy 3
NUR 435 Population Health & Community-based Nursing 5
NUR 450 Caring for the Older Adult 5
NUR 465 Nursing Leadership & Management 5

41 credit hours awarded for RN licensure

General Education Reqiurements

Course Credits
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
Electives Oral & Written Communication * 6
STAT201 Introduction to Statistics 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation* 12
IS 300 Wellness & Health Promotion 3
Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity* 3
Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences* 6
Arts & Science Elective (Varies number of accepted transfer credits)

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Course Descriptions

Updated 11/15/16; 12/20/16; 2/10/17; 2/23/17; 3/7/17; 3/31/17; 5/22/17; 7/26/17; 9/18/17; 9/26/17; 11/13/17; 11/19/17; 12/11/17; 12/21/17; 4/20/18

The course descriptions listed below provide students, faculty, and staff a comprehensive listing. All courses listed are not offered in a given academic year. For a listing of courses provided for each semester, please review the Courses by Semester in SONIS.

Accounting

ACCT 210: Principles of Accounting I: Financial Accounting

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of financial accounting necessary to understand financial statements and provides a practical, real-world method for understanding an organization’s financial statements. Topics include identification, measurement, and reporting of the financial effects of economic events on enterprise.

Co-Requisites: MAT 105

ACCT 220: Principles of Accounting II: Managerial Accounting

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to basic managerial accounting systems, concepts, and principles. Topics include the analysis, interpretation, and reporting of cost data for management’s decision making needs. Cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and performance reporting are discussed as they relate to other business disciplines.

Prerequisites: ACCT 210

Biology

BIO 101: Introductory Biology

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to general biology with emphasis on the human model. Topics covered in the course will include cell structure and function, human evolution, anatomy and physiology, genetics, and the human impact on the environment. This course will acquaint students with the fundamental terms, concepts, and principles of human biology as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 110: A Basic Biological Concepts Tutorial

1 Credit (Lecture)

This one-credit course is intended to run parallel with BIO 111 and BIO 112 and will provide support instruction in underlying biological concepts critical to mastery of Anatomy and Physiology. Through models and other contemporary hands-on modes of instruction, the course will focus on basic biological concepts that are fundamental not only for success in A&P, but also for subsequent nursing instruction.

Co-Requisite: BIO 111

BIO 111: Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

This course is the first phase of a two-semester course designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure and function of human organ systems. A brief review of biological chemistry will be followed by an introduction to cells and tissues. This information will form the basis for the following course content as it relates to the integumentary, osseous (bone), muscular, and nervous systems.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 112: Anatomy and Physiology II

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

BIO 112 continues to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The study of the processes underlying human functioning is also incorporated. The course includes integrated study of the autonomic nervous system, the stress response, special senses, blood, and the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. The course also includes an overview of heredity, development and genetics. Laboratory exercises are designed to complement topics covered in class presentations.

Prerequisite: BIO 111

BIO 113: Anatomy and Physiology through Breath and Movement

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to review foundations of A&P while also learning basic breathing and relaxation techniques and gentle movement routines. The objective of the course is not only to refresh A&P knowledge for students who are currently taking nursing courses and scored less than 50 on the A&P Review Test, but also to provide an opportunity for any student with less than recent A&P instruction to update their knowledge base. Stress management strategies are embedded in the course syllabus to help the student nurse develop healthy habits that can also be shared with future patients. While the A&P review portion of the course will be taught by a faculty member, instruction on breath/movement will be given by a certified yoga instructor. A&P content related to all organ systems will be presented in this review of basic concepts; however, the course will have a special focus on those organ systems that are most impacted by breathing and movement.

Prerequisite: BIO 112

BIO 121: Microbiology

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

BIO 121 is designed to introduce the student to basic knowledge regarding the morphology and physiology of microorganisms relevant to healthcare settings and the living environment as a whole. While emphasis is on direct microbe-human interaction, discussion will incorporate aspects from the growing awareness of global microbial transfer and the passage of microorganisms from animals to humans (zoonoses). Methods for infection control will include study of the body’s own immune response, the current spectrum of anti-microbial agents in use and public health strategies that incorporate both. Laboratory exercises will enhance and elucidate topics covered in lecture presentations.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 160: Food and Fitness

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

Building upon principles from Human Anatomy and Physiology, this one credit one-line course will prepare students to apply critical thinking and computer-based research skills in assessing their personal food and fitness status. Course modules will advance exploration of contemporary health and wellness issues, by introducing students to Internet and social media resources in order to construct and implement an evidence-based personal food and fitness improvement plan with lifelong benefits. In conclusion, based upon their findings, students will present an informed food and fitness policy recommendation.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 180: Biology of Food

3 Credits (Lecture)

Biology of Food – focuses on nutrition and related physiological concepts as an introductory course intended to provide an overview of core principles in nutrition, including the role of nutrition in health and metabolism of the human body. Essential roles of nutrients and other dietary food components will be discussed, with attention to conditions such as pregnancy and disease. Emphasis is placed on how specific nutritional states affect the function of body systems. It will include basic nutritional assessment and appropriate nutritional therapy interventions.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 211: Introduction to Immunology

3 Credits (Lecture)

Immunology is a dynamic and expansive field of biology. The aim of this course is to introduce students to essential immunological concepts.

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of instructor

BIO 215: Core Concepts in Pharmacology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This introductory course is intended to provide an overview of core principles in pharmacology, including pharmacodynamics as it relates to the fate of drugs when they interact within the human body. It will include a clinical survey of pharmaceuticals by category with a focus on prominently profiled drugs as they pertain to specific organ systems. The course does not assume a strong background in the natural sciences. In this course, prerequisite science knowledge is reviewed prior to presenting core concepts.

Prerequisite: BIO 112

BIO 300: Pathophysiology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances to the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition affects the functioning of the system involved as well as its impact on all other body systems.

Prerequisites: BIO 112

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived.

BIO 310: Epidemiology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is an introductory course that has a focus on the distribution and determinants of health-related issues in specific populations and the use of this study to control public health problems. This course explores cause of disease, transmission, screening, incidence and prevalence of disease and the ethics involved around developing public policies for disease control.

Prerequisite: MAT 105

Co-requisite: STAT 201

Business

BUSM 201: Principles of Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This business foundations course provides an introduction to management theory, functions, principles, values, and techniques. The course includes a discussion of best practices in planning, organizing, influencing through leadership, and exercising control within the organization.

Prerequisite: None

Chemistry

CHEM 105: Introduction to Chemistry

5 Credits (3 Lecture +1Lab)

Course under development.

Communications

COM 101: Speech and Oral Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

Speech and Oral Communication is designed to equip the student to communicate effectively with individuals and before large and small groups. Focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively, without offense, in order to be effective in personal interactions both within the workplace and in one’s personal life, and to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in public, and to prepare and make presentations effectively. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and practice presentations with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Co-requisite: ENG 101

COM 102: Essentials of Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

COM 102 is designed to introduce students to the essentials of both public speaking and interpersonal communication in theory and practice. In the area of public speaking, focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively in order to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in front of an audience, and to prepare presentations effectively. In the area of interpersonal communication, focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, practice presentations other in-class activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

COM 110: Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to introduce students to theory and practice in interpersonal (one-on-one) communication. Focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and classroom activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Corequisite: ENG 101

COM 315: Practical Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an applied view of communication, its scope and importance in practice, particularly in the business context, and the role of communication in establishing external and internal working relationships. As a practical communication class, students will learn how to design effective messages for diverse audiences and how to present that information in a credible and convincing way, both written and oral, from concept to delivery. This course presents communication as integral to management strategy and as a critical component for success in the workplace.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Economics

ECO 201: Principles of Economics

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the terminology and analytic principles used in micro- and macro-economics, including the application of these conceptual tools to several policy issues. The microeconomic theories presented include economics of the firm and pricing by supply/demand analysis. Topics also cover consumer behavior, market structure, prices, and distribution and determination of wealth and income. The macroeconomic content discusses variables that impact the business cycle such as interest rates, inflation and employment. The application of economic principles emphasizes decision making in a business context.

Prerequisite: STAT 201

English

ENG 101: English Composition

3 Credits (Lecture)

English Composition 101 fosters development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills that are important to academic and professional success and satisfaction. Through reading, discussing and writing about rich and complex texts (mainly nonfiction prose), students will learn how critical reading, open and unbiased discussion, and effective writing are closely interrelated skills, strengthening each and experiencing the value of each for the other. Students will become more perceptive readers and more articulate and aware thinkers and writers, able to apply these strengths in any academic or professional situation. Students will participate in conversations about texts, ideas and writing projects to foster critical thinking and effective expression. Students will learn and practice all the stages of an effective writing process and will become able to write high-quality papers that follow the conventions and meet the logical and stylistic expectations of formal academic and professional prose.

Prerequisite: None

ENG 201: Survey of American Literature I: Beginnings to 1865

3 Credits (Lecture)

Survey of American Literature will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from colonial beginnings through the Civil War. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 202: Survey of American Literature II: 1865 to the Present

3 Credits (Lecture)

Survey of American Literature II will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from the post-Civil War period to the present. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 205: Composition for Practical Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to expand on knowledge gained in ENG 101. While continuing to investigate methods of effective writing, the course will focus on a business-specific context. Students will improve their abilities to research and analyze complex ideas, to appreciate and develop the skill of effective rhetoric, and to write clear, grammatical, well-structured communications. They will learn to regard effective business writing in terms of a series of strategic choices, including choosing from among a repertoire of tones and styles appropriate in different situations and with different audiences. Students will also improve their editing and critiquing skills, so that they can distinguish effective from ineffective writing and become better writers in a business context.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 210: Introduction to Poetry

3 Credits (Lecture)

Introduction to Poetry provides a survey of the formal elements of poetry and practice in reading poems. Students will tackle poems of all levels of difficulty and sophistication together, carefully and deliberately, through reading assignments, class discussion and activities, and guidance from the instructor. Students will gradually learn the techniques and features of poetry and become able to comprehend and analyze classic and contemporary poems with increasing confidence. The course enables students to understand the insight poetic expression provides into human life and to appreciate the experience of poetry at the elemental level of sound and musical effects. The reading load is light, with class activities focused on clarifying and deepening student understanding of assigned readings. The course is designed to satisfy general education and humanities requirements in-house or when transferred to other institutions.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 231: Literature and Medicine

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

This course provides an opportunity for nursing and health sciences majors to gain insight into the human experience of illness, health and healthcare. In addition to symptoms and needs related to physical illness, all patients also have stories (as do healthcare practitioners as well), and the power of literature reveals dimensions of the experience of disease, healing and death that can help healthcare practitioners develop empathy and insight into patients and themselves, better enabling them to provide care that is effective and humanly satisfying for both care receiver and care giver. In this course students will read and discuss stories, poems, plays and essays by and about doctors, nurses and patients. There will be regular participation in class discussion and online discussion boards, and one paper.

Prerequisite: None

ENG 315: Advanced Composition: Evidence-Based Writing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with training and practice in writing for bachelor-level study and professional practice. Students will practice improved composition strategies in revision and editing appropriate to proficient and polished communication. This course prepares students for current academic responsibilities and establishes a foundation for future academic and professional excellence in communication.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Fine Arts

FA 101: Humanities through the Arts

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the humanities through the lens of the “arts.” To achieve this goal, students will study the visual arts in a historical framework ranging from the Paleolithic to the early 20th century. As students examine the arts, they also will explore how we can “read” them. This means that they will both learn and master a specialized vocabulary to discuss the works as well as develop the ability to discern the values of the culture(s)/artist(s) that produced the arts.

Prerequisite: None

Finance

FIN 201: Principles of Finance

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to provide a basic foundation in the concepts, principles and functions of finance. Topics include the role of finance in business; financial statements, taxes, and cash flows; time value of money; stock and bond valuation; financial analysis and risk; and capital investment analysis and budgeting techniques.

Prerequisite: STAT 201

Co-Requisite: ACCT 220

First Year Experiece

FYE 102: Learning Foundations

2 Credits (2 Lecture)

Learning Foundations will provide an arena where students can establish effective partnerships with faculty, administrators, staff, and other students. The course provides co-curricular programs that engage the student to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the college’s mission of lifelong learning and provides an exciting and challenging environment that promotes academic excellence and personal growth.

Prerequisite: None

FYE 110: Skills for Computer Literacy

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

Skills for Computer Literacy will provide students with knowledge and skills to access and utilize basic computer technology. Students will gain competencies in computer terminology, personal computer skills, effective web usage and office products, with emphasis on technology used at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Prerequisite: None

General Study

GEN 099: SmartPrep

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

This course will provide students an opportunity to strengthen reading, math, science, and/or English knowledge and skills identified on the TEAS test. A generated personalized study plan will include modules with associated learning activities. Reflection activities will increase awareness of personal learning needs and foster growth.

Health Sciences

HCA 101: Medical Terminology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides a foundation for understanding the origin, form and meaning for the vocabulary of healthcare. This includes the prefixes, suffixes and word roots used in the field of medicine. Topics include medical vocabulary and terms related to anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and medical treatments.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 210: Introduction to Integrated Health Care Delivery Systems

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course explores all the major health professions, with emphasis on the U.S. healthcare delivery system. Students will be introduced to the concepts of managed care, health care financing, reimbursement, insurance coverage, Medicare, Medicaid, and the impact of new technology on healthcare services. Students will also research healthcare careers and how the various providers work together to administer health care.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 305: Health Care Non-Profits

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to expand students understanding and knowledge of Healthcare Administration beyond the hospital and private practice settings. It will offer a broad overview of the management challenges of the non-profit sector, and specifically those affecting nonprofit healthcare organizations. It will examine the roles and purposes of various healthcare nonprofit organizations. The course will also cover the structures of nonprofits and some of the budgetary principles key to the success of a nonprofit organization.

HCA 310: Transformational Management in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course examines the structure of healthcare organizations and their management. Through a foundation in management theory and applied studies, students will understand the healthcare workplace and roles within it. Emphasis is placed upon the changes in healthcare delivery models and the implications for organizational structure and the management of people and services.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 320: Information Systems for Evidence-based Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This is an introductory course in the field of Health Information Management (HIM). Topics include: Electronic Health Records (EHRs); general healthcare computer systems; common software applications; system selection and implementation; data quality, storage and retrieval; security and privacy; and other essential topics. This course focuses on how these systems and issues affect health care delivery and the use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) models.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 330: Human Resource Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an introduction of human resource management in the healthcare setting. The course explores the practical knowledge needed for the roles and functions of the human resource department. The focus is to deliver skills and knowledge to healthcare administrators related to: Equal Employment Opportunity, staffing, assessment and evaluation; development of personnel policies; training; benefits; and safety and health in the workplace.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 340: Marketing Techniques in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course covers the fundamental marketing topics such as market research, strategy, and the strategic marking process. Students will learn how to effectively apply marketing principles, develop marketing strategies, and conduct analyses in a health care setting. Marketing principles will be explored through practical, hands-on application in the healthcare industry.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 350: Financial Management of Health Care Institutions

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course applies the concepts of financial management within health care organizations. It examines how organizations are financed, both from external as well as internal sources. Topics include financial planning principles, reimbursement procedures, and governmental regulation and legal restraints.

Prerequisite: FIN 201, HCA 210

HCA 360: Health Care Law

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course is an overview of health law issues. Court cases, state and federal statues, and common-law principles are used to help students understand the practical application of the concepts learned. Government regulation topics including legal constraints, liability, negligence, patient rights, confidentiality, and corporate/administrative responsibility are examined.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 365: Consumer Engagement in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

There is an emerging consensus that informed and engaged consumers have a vital role to play in reducing costs, improving quality of care and thereby improving health outcomes.With this end in mind, this course will explore the current research in practices and interventions aimed at improving consumer engagement. Students will evaluate the evidence and will adapt a proven strategy for proposed implementation.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 390: HCA Professional Development

1 Credit (Lecture)

In HCA 390 students will apply the knowledge and skills gained in the HCA major to prepare for the culminating HCA 450 Administrative Leadership Capstone Course, or HCA 460 Internship, and a career in health care administration. Topics include: Laying a Foundation for Success; Building and Maintaining a Forward-Moving Career; and Identifying and Seeking Career Opportunities. Students will also explore HCA professional societies and learn the value of networking, continuing education and life-long professional development.

Pre-requisites: HCA 310, HCA 340, HCA 350, and HCA 360

Co-Requisite: HCA 320, HCA 330

HCA 410: Health Care Policy

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course describes the current structure of the American healthcare system at federal and state levels and examines the role of historical and political contexts to current policies and institutional structures. Federal organizations such as CMS, ONC, HRSA, and their relationship to state institutions such as Medicaid and public health are examined. Healthcare policies, including the Affordable Care Act and payment reform are appraised within the framework of public and private stakeholders including providers, payers, trade organizations and public agencies.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 415: Ethical Issues in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course investigates the ethical principles that apply to businesses and other organizations that are connected to the healthcare field. Students will strengthen their ethics knowledge base and relate ethics to patient issues across the lifespan, ethics within organization, and issues of ethics in broader cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 420: Health Care Quality and Performance Excellence

3 Credits (Lecture)

Acquaint students with the principles of quality assessment, health status, and how to improve value in health care under policies supporting continuous quality improvement. This includes two components: clinical improvements and process improvements.

Prerequisite: HCA 310, HCA 350

Co-Requisite: HCA 320, HCA 330

HCA 425: Project Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the mechanics and obstacles of project management. Successful project managers exemplify skills needed to manage their teams, schedules, risks, and resources to produce a desired outcome. Students are given the opportunity to acquire these needed skills with a hands-on approach to learning. This course focuses on the development, execution, and control of projects that will support organizational objectives that can be measured for success. The course also challenges students to consider how failures can be anticipated and averted.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201

HCA 430: Health Care Strategic Planning

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces concepts of strategic planning and management of healthcare systems as an essential part of healthcare administration. Concepts throughout the course include modern business approaches to strategy, involvement of stakeholders in decision making, and issues facing dynamic healthcare environments.

Prerequisite: HCA 310, HCA 320, HCA 330, HCA 340, HCA 350

HCA 435 Social Determinants of Community Health

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the science and art of maintaining, protecting, and improving the health of people through organized community efforts within the public health context. Students will develop an understanding of historical and theoretical foundations of community health and major societal health concerns, and will explore the ways communities are affected by and affect health.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 440: Economic Applications of Operational Excellence

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an introduction to the study of health care economics. HCA 440 will cover the basic economic concepts important to the field of health economics and learn why health is different from other goods and services. The course will focus on the historical evolution of health care markets, current legislative changes and public policy implications. Topics include the definition and determinants of health, socioeconomic status and inequality, demand for health care, health care provision, technology and pharmaceuticals, private and public insurance, and health and the labor market.

Prerequisite: ECO 201

HCA 445: Leadership for Health Care Administrators

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on developing and understanding leadership skills and concepts. Students explore a variety of theories related to leadership, management, and change. Analysis of leadership styles, behaviors, and communication techniques assists with the development of skills necessary to lead within a healthcare system.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 450: Administrative Leadership Capstone Project

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to provide a “real-world” application of the student’s classroom experience, with focus on transition to health care administrator as a professional. Through a culminating project, students will apply their knowledge and skills in management, reimbursement, financing and the nature of health care. Students will practice creating a collaborative environment that will support various providers working together to administer health care. Students will also revisit and refine their personal career plan.

Prerequisite: HCA 390, HCA 410, HCA 420

HCA 460: Health Care Administration Internship

3 Credits (Field Work)

Students in this Internship opportunity will gain invaluable hands-on experience in the health care field. This is a student-driven endeavor that is assisted by faculty consultation. The focus of this internship is to foster the development of professional skills needed in preparing students for the workforce.

Prerequisite: HCA 390, HCA 410, HCA 420

Humanities

HUM 101: Collaborative Inquiry Foundations Seminar

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course engages students in the reading and discussion of short, accessible, culturally important selections from classic and contemporary works in the humanities that raise enduringly fascinating questions, such as the individual’s identity and relation to the community, the means of individual and group empowerment, the sources of authority, differences and similarities among people, and the possibilities of shared collaborative enterprises—in other words, how human society works and how we can more powerfully contribute our share in cooperation with others. In a seminar format, with short texts at the center of discussion, students learn to more clearly formulate and express their ideas, and in the process, they learn to speak and listen responsibly and respectfully to others. Students investigate their individual assumptions and presuppositions and compare and contrast them with other ideas articulated in class or by the author, thereby learning to read more closely and comprehend more accurately. Gradually, students assume greater responsibility for their own learning, even sharing in leadership of discussions. Students grow individually and as a group through a series of engaging learning experiences that systematically foster respect, creative thinking and problem solving, and a genuine sense of connection through a shared focus on important concepts.

Prerequisite: None

HUM 280: People and Their Food

3 Credits (Lecture)

Eating is something we do every day, but do you really pay attention to what you are eating or why you make the food choices that you do? In this course, we will take an investigative look into global and local food availability, accessibility, utilization, and stability through a critical food lens. We will examine our personal food choices, food habits, and traditions compared to others and how our food choices impact food production, food markets, and our health. We will explore shifting trends and multiple perspectives on agrifood production and critically analyze the effects of this production on our personal health and the environment.

Prerequisite: None.

Interdisciplinary

IS 200: Service Learning in Our Community

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

Service Learning in Our Community - is an interdisciplinary/inter-professional course in which the student is introduced to service learning. In this course, students will have the opportunity to interact with diverse populations while contributing to the community through hands-on service activities. Ongoing student reflection will focus on how the various service activities contributed toward the meeting of course outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Pre-requisites: None

IS 201: The Roles of Women in Society

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to explore the lives of women in past and contemporary cultures, focusing especially on the themes of domestic roles, workplace roles, image roles, violence roles, and even how women are and have been defined.

Prerequisite: None

IS 300: Wellness and Health Promotion

3 Credits (Lecture)

In this course, we will discuss wellness and health promotion for all people, and we must begin with an appreciative curiosity about the differences in people. Establishing an understanding about how individual’s perceptions of wellness are influenced by values and beliefs, will enable you to assist individuals, families, and communities to recognize the significance of health and wellness. We will also discuss alternative theories of health and wellness. We will explore holistic care, nutrition, activity and exercise, stress and coping, and preventative medicine as strategies to promote health and wellness.

Prerequisites: SOPS 101 or equivalent. SOPS 105 and PSY 210 or equivalents are recommended.

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived.

Mathematics

MAT 105: College Algebra

3 Credits (3 Lecture)

MAT 105 is designed to study the basic concepts of arithmetic and algebra, the real numbers, linear equations, inequalities, quadratic equations, graphing, rational expressions, functions, exponents, radicals, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and systems of linear equations.

Prerequisite: None

Nursing

NUR 091: Health Assessment RM

3 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 091 assists students in remediation of content areas of health assessment in need of strengthening. This course will focus on health assessment, study and test taking strategies, and time and stress management.

Pre-requisite: NUR 220

Co-requisite: None

NUR 092: Health and Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan RM

3 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 092 assists students in remediation of content areas of health and illness across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in need of strengthening. This course will focus health and illness across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems, study and test taking strategies, and time and stress management.

Pre-requisite: NUR 305

Co-requisite: None

NUR 100: Concepts for Nursing Practice

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 100 introduces the student to the basic concepts appropriate to nursing practice. These concepts include caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, the teaching-learning process and the roles and behavior of the professional nurse. The nursing process is introduced as a comprehensive clinical decision-making strategy, as well as a framework for providing and managing competent best practices and evidence-based care to promote, maintain, or restore the client’s optimal level of health. Nursing’s metaparadigm and the biological, psychosocial, and spiritual/religious dimensions of human needs are defined and analyzed.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT 105

NUR 106: NCLEX Success Course I

1 Credit

Nursing 106 is designed to provide the student with the structure and content of the NCLEX-RN® examination including the test blueprint. The intent and schematic of the series of NCLEX Success Courses will be explained. Strategies for testing success in studying for and taking NCLEX type exams will be covered.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 100, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT 105

NUR 107: NCLEX Success Course II

1 Credit

Nursing 107 requires the student to apply the strategies learned in the previous NCLEX Success Course in formal and informal testing situations. The course culminates in analyzing standardized test results with the course faculty and designing and incorporating individual strategies for NCLEX Success.

Prerequisite: NUR 100, NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT105, NUR 199 if applicable

Co-requisite: NUR 150

NUR 110: Nursing Health Assessment

2 Credits (1 lecture + 1 lab)

Nursing 110 provides the student with knowledge of the concepts necessary to perform a comprehensive health history and health assessment of individual clients across the lifespan. To facilitate acquisition of knowledge and concepts, the course incorporates biophysical, psychosocial and spiritual growth and development into the dimensions of health assessment. Emphasis is placed on the normal age-related findings of assessment as well as appropriate developmental tasks. Human needs are used as an organizing framework.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 100, and NUR 121, MAT 105, NUR 199 if applicable

NUR 121: Foundations of Nursing Practice

6 Credits (4 lecture + 2 clinical)

Nursing 121 provides the student with the fundamental competencies, skills, and techniques of nursing practice. Caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, the teaching learning process, best practices, and evidenced-based care, as well as scientific rationale and pharmacological considerations, provide the basis for applying clinical nursing therapeutics and prevention strategies to meet the unique biological and psychosocial needs of the client. The roles of the nurse and application of the nursing process as the framework for clinical experiences focus on assisting the adult client to meet acute and long-term healthcare needs and reinforce the application of theory content to practice settings. A skills laboratory practicum, in conjunction with clinical experiences with adult medical-surgical clients in acute care settings, reinforces the application of theory content to practice settings.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 100, MAT 105

NUR 150: Nursing Management of Client Needs I

8 Credits (5 lecture + 3 clinical)

Nursing 150 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing care for adult clients in medical-surgical settings. Utilizing the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework, students apply primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client’s position on the health continuum. Content focuses on the nursing management of clients with needs related to safety and protection, activity, nutrition, elimination, regulation, oxygenation, circulation, cognition, and sensation. Emphasis is also placed on the care of the client with needs related to the surgical experience.

Clinical experiences focus on the acute care health needs of adult clients and emphasize the use of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors as the clinical competencies required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs.

Prerequisite: NUR 100, NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT105, NUR 199 if applicable

Co-requisite: NUR 107

NUR 199: LPN to RN Transition Course

3 Credits

Nursing 199 is a three credit course designed to enable the student to explore integrative concepts in nursing and to assist the student in the transition from license practical nurse to registered nurse. Students refine and update previous learning in addition to identifying goals for successful transition to the registered nursing program. Combined with classroom, on line, and nursing laboratory experiences, the student learns through the application of concepts. The student will demonstrate the ability to solve problems through the use of the nursing process with a focus on client assessment and to communicate more effectively.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR110

NUR 206: NCLEX Success Course III

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 206 continues to foster the student test taking techniques and remediation strategies as preparation for the NCLEX-RN® examination. A series of standardized tests as well as other indicators provides the student with additional information to revise or strengthen the student’s remediation plan. This is also the time to begin or continue to discuss how to facilitate the positive mental attitude requisite to NCLEX success.

Prerequisite: NUR107, NUR150

Co-requisite: NUR 211

NUR 207: NCLEX Success Course IV

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 207 prepares the graduating student with the tools requisite for success on the NCLEX-RN® examination. This course is designed to review with the student’s assigned NCLEX Coach the updated status of a student’s indicators, analyze areas of needed remediation, and design strategies for success.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 215

NUR 211: Nursing Management of Client Needs II

10 Credits (5 lecture + 5 clinical)

Nursing 211 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of adult client with complex, multi-system medical-surgical needs. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on the nursing management of complex health needs related to the client and family experiencing disorders of mental health, nutrition, elimination, cognition, oxygenation and circulation including medical emergencies.

Clinical experiences focus on the acute care health needs of adult clients and emphasize the clinical competencies of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, students apply primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client‘s position on the health continuum.

Prerequisite: NUR 107, NUR 150, BIO 112, BIO 121, ENG 101

Co-requisite: NUR 206

NUR 213: Nursing Management of Client Needs III

5 Credits (3.3 lecture + 1.7 clinical in an eight (8) week session)

Nursing 213 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of specialized groups of clients with multidimensional needs in a variety of settings. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on the nursing management of the bio/psycho/social healthcare needs of the client and family during pregnancy, reproductive health needs, and birth and of the child along the health-illness continuum.

Clinical experiences include maternal-child and emphasize the clinical competencies of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, students apply primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client’s position on the health continuum.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 207

NUR 215: Transition to Professional Nursing

5 Credits (2 lecture + 3 clinical in an eight (8) week session)

Transition to Professional Nursing - is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of a group of clients in a variety of settings. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on manager of care concepts, transition into entry level practice, and concept of professionalism. Clinical is a preceptor based experience caring for clients in a variety of settings across the life span. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, the students focus on caring for a group of clients integrating collaboration, communication with health care team members, and the application of theoretical healthcare concepts.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 207

NUR 216: Introduction to Perioperative Nursing Care

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts of perioperative nursing to senior nursing students promoting advanced knowledge into the highly specialized area of practice. The objective of this learning is to enhance the experience and improve outcomes for surgical patients throughout the continuum of care. Emphasis will be placed on applying of the nursing process to the concepts of aseptic technique/ infection control and care of the anesthetized patient within the intraoperative environment.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 217: Concepts of Critical Care Nursing

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to explore the care of adult patients with complex, critical care needs. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process to the critical care environment. Content focuses on the nursing management of patients with alterations in major body systems requiring critical care therapy. Common problems in critical care nursing will also be explored including sedation/delirium management, pain/pain management, nutritional alterations, and end-of-life care.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 218: Introduction to Oncology Nursing

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to provide the student with oncological concepts promoting the advanced knowledge in this specialized area of nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on patient and family-centered nursing care with a focus on the nursing management of the adult oncology patient. Cancers and the risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, staging, treatment, and follow up care are addressed. Multiple treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, surgery and radiation and the nursing management of side effects from treatment will be discussed. Common problems in oncology nursing will be explored including; comfort, end-of-life issues and oncologic emergencies.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 219: Medical-Surgical Nursing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to explore the care of adult patients with acute and chronic healthcare problems. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process to understand and incorporate best practice for common medical conditions and emergencies. Evidence-based practice will be the framework to explore current practice, pharmacological therapies and new trends. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgement skills.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 311

Co-requisite: NUR 215

NUR 290: Advanced Medical-Surgical Remediation Elective

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course assists students in remediation of content areas in need of strengthening and on test taking strategies. This course will focus on advanced medical-surgical content, mental health, and pharmacology.

Authorization by ADN Program Director is required.

Co-requisite: None

NUR 220/NUR 220A: Health Assessment with Lab

4 Credits (2 lecture + 2 lab credits)

This course provides the student with knowledge of the concepts necessary to perform a comprehensive health history and health assessment of individual patients across the lifespan. To facilitate acquisition of knowledge and concepts, the course incorporates biophysical, psychosocial and spiritual growth and development into the dimensions of health assessment. Emphasis is placed on the normal age-related findings of assessment as well as appropriate developmental tasks. Hands-on laboratory time and simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite: BIO 112, SOPS 105, FYE 102, PSY 110

Co-requisite: NUR 297/NUR 297A, BIO 300

NUR 221/NUR 221A: Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety

4 Credits (2 lecture + 2 clinical)

This course builds upon health assessment competencies, specifically incorporating the concepts of safety, functional ability, fluid and electrolytes, infection, nutrition, sensory perception, thermoregulation, and pain in the performance of clinical nursing skills. Service learning experiences, simulation experiences, and select acute care inpatient clinical experiences will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A, NUR 297/NUR 297A, BIO 300, BIO 121, MAT 105, IS 200, CHEM105

Co-requisite: NUR 298/NUR 298A, BIO 180, BIO 215, IS200

NUR 297/NUR 297A: Professional Development Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student is introduced to the concepts of caring, professionalism, development, and the nursing process. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to establishing human connections in the role of the nurse. Students will be introduced to the profession of nursing and to the use of the nursing process to guide clinical decision-making across the lifespan. Areas of interest for the capstone project will begin to be explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: SOPS 101, FYE 102

Co-requisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A

NUR 298/NUR 298A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credits (Lecture)

This is a professional development course in which the student is introduced to the concepts of clinical judgment and the NCLEX exam. Students will begin to learn strategies for success in preparing to take NCLEX. The concept of professionalism is further explored in this course, especially as it relates to professional licensure and accuracy in practice. Responsibilities of the nurse related to independent practice decisions and management of care are explored. Areas of interest for the capstone project are explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A, NUR 297/NUR 297A

Co-requisite NUR 221/NUR 221A

NUR 305/NUR 305A: Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan I

6 Credits (4 lecture + 2 clinical)

This course is a health and illness course in which the student participates in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care to patients in a variety of settings and to providing leadership for the interprofessional healthcare team. Service learning experiences in the community and in long-term care settings, as well as focused acute care clinical experiences, will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, NUR 298/NUR 298A, BIO 215, PSY 210

Co-requisite: None

NUR 307/NUR 307A: Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with a foundational understanding of research, evidence-based practice, healthcare quality, and healthcare information systems and technologies utilized in nursing practice and nursing education. A basic understanding of research terminology and process will be explored. Introduction to evidence-based practice will emphasize identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, performing an effective search for sound evidence, and changing practice based on evidence. Information management systems to improve healthcare outcomes related to safety, quality, cost-effectiveness, and coordination of healthcare services along with ethical, legal, and regulatory issues will also be explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, STAT 201

NUR 309/NUR 309A: Professional Nursing Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in professional nursing concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to collaboration, care coordination, patient education, caregiving and palliation. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on the concept of family caregiving, especially as it relates to chronic and terminal disease. Completing of a formal teaching plan will allow students to obtain the skills necessary to provide healthcare teaching in any setting. An emphasis on collaboration with other nurses and with the inter-professional team provides the basis for care coordination in a variety of settings. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, ENG 315

NUR 311/NUR 311A: Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II

6 Credits (4 Lecture + 2 Clinical)

This course is a health and illness course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care and patient education in a variety of settings and to providing leadership for the interprofessional healthcare team. Service learning experiences in the community and in long-term care settings, as well as focused acute care clinical experiences, will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305/NUR 305A

NUR 312: Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery

4 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in nursing leadership and health care delivery concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to leadership, healthcare policy, healthcare economics, healthcare law, and change theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore the professional nurse’s role in leading the inter-professional team. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the current and future healthcare system as it is affected by healthcare economics, policy, and law. Change theory will be utilized to solve a current problem in healthcare. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 307

Co-requisite: None

NUR 312A: Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in nursing leadership and health care delivery concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to leadership, healthcare policy, healthcare economics, healthcare law, and change theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore the professional nurse’s role in leading the inter-professional team. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the current and future healthcare system as it is affected by healthcare economics, policy, and law. Change theory will be utilized to solve a current problem in healthcare. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 307A

Co-requisite: None

NUR 313: Concepts in Population Health

2 Credits (2 Lecture)

This course 313 introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population–focused care. Building upon previously-learned concepts, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for planning population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a project focused on the older adult in the community, students perform a comprehensive evidence-based assessment and plan health promotion. Simulation assists the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills related to the concepts of addiction, self-management, and interpersonal violence. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305

Co-requisite: None

NUR 313A: Concepts in Population Health

3 Credits (2 Lecture)

This course introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population–focused care. Building upon previously-learned concepts, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for planning population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a project focused on the older adult in the community, students perform a comprehensive evidence-based assessment and plan health promotion. Simulation assists the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills related to the concepts of addiction, self-management, and interpersonal violence. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305A

Co-requisite: None

NUR 320: Nursing Informatics

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course will provide students with a knowledge base of healthcare information systems and technologies utilized in nursing practice and nursing education. The focus of this course is to explore information management systems to improve healthcare outcomes related to safety, quality, cost-effectiveness, and coordination of healthcare services along with ethical, legal, and regulatory issues. Consumer health information sources are explored and analyzed.

Prerequisite: None

Note: Must be taken in the first 8 weeks of enrollment in the RN-BSN program.

NUR 335: Introduction to Research and Evidence-Based Practice

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course will provide students with a foundational understanding of research and evidence-based practice. A basic understanding of research terminology and process will be explored. Introduction to evidence-based practice will emphasize identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, performing an effective search for sound evidence, and changing practice based on evidence. The basic understanding of research and evidence-based practice will serve as a foundation for improving patient outcomes.

Prerequisite: STAT 201, ENG 315, NUR 350

NUR 350: Nursing Theories and Foundational Concepts

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on nursing theory, philosophy and conceptual frameworks as a foundation of nursing practice. Students will explore the impact of nursing theory, philosophy, and conceptual frameworks as they relate to the profession and the role of the nurse. An understanding of these concepts will be the foundation for professional growth and advancement.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 365: Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course explores legal and ethical issues in the delivery of healthcare. The nurse’s role in ethical clinical practice is examined. The student examines personal and professional values in relation to ethical and legal issues occurring in the practice of professional nursing. Appraising basic principles of current legal concepts and professional ethical codes provides a foundation for professional practice. Sociocultural influences on ethical and legal concepts are explored.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 397/NUR 397A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The concept of professionalism is further explored in this course as it relates to scope of practice. Areas of interest for the Capstone project will be refined, with identification of a specific Capstone topic area by the end of this course. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 298/NUR 298A, COM 101

NUR 398/NUR 398A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s chosen topic for the Capstone project will be developed in a Capstone Proposal in which the student will delineate strategies for assessment of the population at risk, anticipated population outcomes, the implementation of evidence-based interventions to improve population outcomes, and evaluation of the achievement of population outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 397/NUR 397A

NUR 401, 402, 403, 404: Clinical Internship Elective

1 Credit (Clinical)

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop and refine knowledge and skills necessary in providing direct patient care. Working with a preceptor, students will care for patients/populations in a healthcare setting.

Students will reflect on the role of the BSN-prepared registered nurse within a complex and dynamic healthcare system, especially as related to quality and safety in patient care.

Prerequisite: None

NUR 410: Clinical Intensive I

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care in the inpatient acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 311, NUR 312, NUR 313

NUR 410A: Clinical Intensive I

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care in the inpatient acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self- directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 311A, NUR 313A

NUR 412: Clinical Intensive II

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the community setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 410

NUR 412A: Clinical Intensive II

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the community setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 410A

NUR 414: Clinical Intensive III

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This is a role transition course in medical surgical nursing in which the student will perform care in the role of the professional nurse under the direction of a preceptor. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients in the acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412

NUR 414A: Clinical Intensive III

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This is a role transition course in medical surgical nursing in which the student will perform care in the role of the professional nurse under the direction of a preceptor. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients in the acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412A

NUR 416: Clinical Intensive IV

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in the specialty or community setting. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the specialty setting or in the community. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412

NUR 416A: Clinical Intensive IV

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in the specialty or community setting. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the specialty setting or in the community. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412A

NUR 420: Health Care Policy

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to influence policy in a dynamic healthcare environment. Financial and regulatory environments are investigated to determine the impact on patient outcomes and the role of healthcare professionals. Advocacy as a healthcare professional to promote social justice of vulnerable populations is discussed.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 435: Population Health and Community-Based Nursing

5 Credits (3 didactic + 2 clinical)

This course introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population –focused care. Building upon previous nursing education, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a community clinical practicum, students assess the economic, sociocultural, and environmental influences and develop interventions to meet community-based and population-focused needs.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 450: Caring for the Older Adult

5 Credits (3 didactic + 2 clinical)

This course focuses on the highly complex needs of the older adult and their families. Students will explore socioeconomic, physical, psychological, safety, ethical, and legal issues of the older adult. Evidence regarding health promotion, health maintenance, and acute/chronic disease management is examined to develop patient-centered care for the older adult. A clinical practicum will address the needs of the independent older adult living in the community.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 465: Leadership and Management in Nursing

5 Credits (2 didactic + 3 lab)

This course focuses on developing and understanding leadership skills and concepts. Students explore a variety of theories related to leadership, management, and change. Analysis of leadership styles, behaviors, and communication techniques assist with the development of skills necessary to lead at the bedside and within a healthcare system. Students examine evidence-based quality improvement and patient safety strategies to improve healthcare outcomes. A capstone project involving quality improvement change in either the acute care or community setting will be initiated.

Prerequisite: NUR 335, NUR 435.

Note: Must be taken in the last 8 weeks of enrollment in RN-BSN core courses.

NUR 497/NUR 497A: Professional Development Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s Capstone project will be implemented as developed in the Capstone Proposal. The student will implement an assessment of the identified population at risk and will implement evidence-based interventions to improve population outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 398/NUR 398A

NUR 498/NUR 498A: Professional Development Concepts/ Capstone

2 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 498 is a professional development course in which the student continues to follow TCCNHS NCLEX Success Plan. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s Capstone project will be evaluated as developed in the Capstone Proposal. The student will evaluate outcomes for an identified population at risk following implementation of interventions. A final Capstone Paper and Presentation will illustrate the Capstone project in its entirety. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 497/NUR 497A

Philosophy

PHI 103: Introduction to Ethics

3 Credits (Lecture)

Introduction to Ethics will assist students in coming to understand the various theoretical, conceptual frameworks, and application models of moral reasoning. Such applications of theoretical models and frameworks will expose the student to different approaches to moral competence and decision-making in complex life situations. This course aims to be holistic in its approach; hence ethics-related issues involving medical/health issues will be minimized and a broad humanities-based approach will be incorporated.

Prerequisite: None

PHI 205: World Religions

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of and appreciation for the major religions of the world; Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam. In addition the course will explore indigenous spiritual paths such as Celtic and Native American spiritual traditions. The course will explore the history of each tradition, its core beliefs, cosmology, canon of sacred writings, and styles of prayer and worship. This course will also explore humanism in its various forms, as well as atheism. The course will also address the influence of these various traditions on society, as well as the issues surrounding the diversity of religious traditions in a highly pluralistic society.

Prerequisite: None

PHI 210: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Health Care and Research

3 Credits (Lecture)

Based on their prior knowledge of ethical reasoning and traditional and contemporary moral theories, learners will explore through reading, research, and experiential learning activities the ethical issues embedded within contemporary healthcare and health research. Using their moral reasoning skills, learners will have the opportunity to propose ethical solutions to the many problems that arise within today’s healthcare and bioresearch.

Prerequisite: PHI 103

Psychology

PSY 110: Lifespan Development

3 Credits (Lecture)

Students will learn about the psychological theories/conceptual frameworks and research that inform the study of cognitive, personality, and social development across the lifespan.

Prerequisite: None

PSY 210: Concepts of Behavior Change

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course builds on the foundational knowledge in introductory social sciences courses that focus on understanding thought and behavior to help learners understand how and why people change their behavior. Theories of learning, goal-setting, performance, sports psychology, motivation, and self-reflection will be used to help learners see why people do or do not change their behavior so that, ultimately, methods can be used to design plans for those that could benefit from changes in behavior.

Prerequisite: None

Sociology

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology

3 Credits (Lecture)

What makes up a society? A society is composed of separate, but interrelated components, or social institutions. The family, government, education, and religion are some of the large structures that guide our everyday lives. Introduction to Sociology explores these institutions of society, along with other individual factors, such as race, class, and gender, in order to understand what it means to live in a global society. Students are given the opportunity to develop their sociological imagination to become critical of the world around them, and will learn to analyze this social world using a variety of theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite: None

SOC 102: Sociological Perspectives on U.S. Diversity

3 Credits (Lecture)

Sociological Perspectives on U.S. Diversity is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the United States and its incredibly diverse population. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101

SOC 103: Sociological Perspectives on Global Diversity

3 Credits (Lecture)

Sociological Perspectives on Global Diversity is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the global diverse populations. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101

SOC 200: Seminar on Race

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

Explore the ways that race still matters in a society that considers itself to be post-racial. In this discussion-based seminar, we consider what race is, how it is socially constructed, and the ways that institutional discrimination and inequality persist. How we interpret our own racial identity is guided by the ways we understand race operating in our society. Throughout the course, we reflect on our everyday experiences to better understand how race is relevant – including in a healthcare environment.

Prerequisite: None.

SOPS 101: Introduction to Social Psychology

3 Credits (Lecture)

Social psychology is the systematic study of human social behavior. In this course, you will study how individuals and groups of people behave, and what causes these behaviors. You will learn to use theoretical perspectives to answer questions like, “Why are people attracted to one another?” and “When are we most likely to help a stranger?” and “Why do some people follow rules, while other people break them?” You will study classical and contemporary research to understand how the scientific method is used to test and create theories of social behavior.

SOPS 105: Social and Cultural Issues in Regional Healthcare

3 Credits (Lecture)

Healthcare in our region is delivered in a variety of settings by diverse human beings using many different methods: in clinics, hospitals, schools, even grocery stores! This course invites you to explore these settings and to better understand our healthcare system. At the center of this exploration will be us, the human beings seeking and giving the care. We will discuss the social and cultural factors (determinants) that influence individuals’ health decisions and behaviors as well as the social and cultural competencies expected of healthcare providers. We will also explore our healthcare system, discussing organization and structure, and the places and ways healthcare is delivered and experienced.

Prerequisite: None

SOPS 201: Exploring Current Topics in Health

1 Credits (1 Lecture)

This course is intended to prepare advanced-standing students for lifelong learning and professional development. It also provides an opportunity for students to earn 1 credit hour working directly with faculty. Students will work directly with identified faculty member to explore a topic or concept from a multi-faceted perspective (for example, to explore cultural competency in a community-based health care organization or to conduct an asset mapping of social-service resources for an identified population). So the student will make connections with the college outcomes in a framework relevant to the learning needs of the student, students will engage in designing their own leaning experience, assignment or projects, as well as methods for self-assessment and evaluation.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Associate Dean and assignment to faculty member. Advanced-standing students only.

Statistics

STAT 201: Introduction to Statistics

3 Credits (Lecture)

STAT 201 focuses on the use of statistics to conduct and critique research. Topics include: descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and the use of computer software for statistical applications. Students will learn to apply, analyze, and interpret statistics from research articles and data in the health care setting.

Prerequisites: MAT 105 or equivalent.

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived

Technology

TECH 101: Basic Technology Skills and Applications

3 Credits (Lecture)

Being a contributing citizen in the 21st Century requires the use of technology. This course will provide an introduction to basic computer/technology skills, word processing, cloud applications, and trending apps that will be helpful in any working field or arena.

Prerequisites: None

Academic Policies and Procedures

General Notice

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences reserves the right to alter or discontinue any of its programs, fees, policies, or services, and to change any provision or policy in the interest of the College or its students at any point in time. The College also reserves the right to cancel courses and course sections, even after registration has taken place, if there is low enrollment, the unavailability of a qualified faculty person, the lack of a clinical site, or other extenuating circumstances. Every effort will be made to place students in other sections of the same course if this is possible.

As a matter of policy, students at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences are bound by the curriculum in effect. Once accepted, all students without transfer credit exemption status for previously completed college courses must follow the pre-arranged College course schedules. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences may terminate at any time the enrollment of a student whose scholastic standing, performance, health, aptitude, or social conduct does not meet the requirements of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Curricular changes are to be expected in response to rapidly changing regulatory, educational, and/or healthcare environmental factors.

Academic Integrity and Honesty

Updated 3/29/16

In an effort to remain faithful to the College’s core values, especially those of integrity and excellence, it is the expectation that all members of the College community make ongoing efforts to be people of integrity in all learning modalities including classroom, clinical, laboratory, simulation, and online learning so that a culture of integrity can pervade the institution. Academic integrity can be understood as the consistency between the promises that we make and the words that we speak and the actions that we perform.

As an institution, we have the responsibility to act with integrity. The institution must make certain the promises it makes to its students, faculty, staff, and to the community are realized in the words put forth by the College, and by all of the actions taken by the College.

The faculty and the staff have a responsibility to act with integrity. Every faculty member must make certain that there is consistency between the learning outcomes of every course and the learning activities in which they engage. They must make certain that every policy in their course syllabi is carried out equally for all students. The staff need to ensure that they perform their various duties with integrity.

Students, by virtue of their membership in the College community, must also ensure that they are people of integrity by engaging in words and actions that uphold the values of the College: caring, collaboration, excellence, and integrity. The College community is strengthened when actions are in line with the promises that are made and implied by each member of the College community. A student’s acceptance of admission to the College constitutes a commitment to act honorably in all situations and to uphold the policies, procedures, and behavioral expectations of the College.

All members of the College community are held to the highest standard of integrity. The actions of each member of the College community should demonstrate a consistency between the values that we uphold and the words that we speak and the actions that we take.

Examples of Failures to Uphold Academic Integrity and Honesty in all communication and learning modalities including classroom, clinical, laboratory, simulation, and online learning:

The Institution:

  • When its advertising is not consistent with what is actually delivered at the school.
  • If its tuition and fees are not reflective of actual institutional need.
  • When policies are not clearly articulated or when policies are not justly and equitably applied.

The Faculty and Staff:

When faculty or staff fail to clearly articulate what is expected of students especially with regard to integrity and fail to note the sanctions for violating academic integrity standards

  • When faculty fail to define course learning outcomes
  • If faculty do not actually teach to the learning outcomes
  • When faculty fail to properly cite the sources of their information
  • If faculty fail to treat all students equitably and with fairness and justice

The Student:

  • When a student falsifies records
  • If a student cheats, plagiarizes, or purchases a paper and claims it as their own
  • When a student collaborates with others on a paper or project that is supposed to reflect their own work
  • If a student steals
  • When a student violates copyright laws or engages in the unauthorized copying of software
  • If a student observes the lack of integrity on the part of another student and fails to report it

What to Do if You Witness Behaviors that Violate Academic Integrity:

All Members of the College community have a responsibility to ensure that a culture of integrity is pervasive throughout the institution. Each member of the community has an obligation to report actions that violate our common commitment to integrity and excellence.

Faculty Obligations:

  • Address the alleged incident (through investigation) with the student(s), render a decision, and report their response/action to the appropriate Administrator of the College; or
  • Submit the alleged incident(s) to the appropriate Administrator for review, consultation, and possible institutional action.

NOTE: The nature of the incident will determine if resolution and consequences will be determined by faculty and/or administration. Secondly, in situations involving suspected academic dishonesty within a course, faculty have full authority to assign the grade for the assignment, test, quiz, or course. Administration retains the responsibility and right to impose additional sanctions up to and including academic dismissal from the College.

Student Obligations:

  • Outline the alleged breach to the appropriate faculty member(s) whose class the alleged breach occurred as soon as reasonably possible following an incident. Students should bear in mind that though they might inform an academic administrator, the academic administrator will refer the matter back to the course in question so the faculty member(s) can deal with according to academic policies set forth within the classroom. The student should make sure that all information is objective and clear, including the date and time of the incident, name of the student, and the assignment/examination in question.
  • Once an allegation has been made, the faculty member(s) will address as outlined above. NOTE: It is important to note that due to privacy, confidentiality, and other material evidence, a decision will not be announced to the student who has outlined the allegation.

Academic Freedom and Responsibility

The Academic Freedom and Educational Responsibility of Faculty and Students

A college or university is a dedicated social place where students will encounter new knowledge, different perspectives, competing ideas, and alternative claims to truth. Liberal education helps students develop the skills of analysis and critical inquiry with particular emphasis on exploring and evaluating competing claims and different perspectives. Liberally educated students are curious about new intellectual questions, open to alternative ways of viewing a situation or problem, disciplined to follow intellectual methods to conclusions, capable of accepting criticism from others, tolerant of ambiguity, and respectful of others with different views. Personal development is an integral part of intellectual development.

In any education of quality, a variety of competing claims to truth can be explored and tested free from political interference. The persons who drive the production of knowledge and the process of education are highly trained faculty. These individuals take responsibility for the quality of their scholarship and teaching.

In order to foster a true educational experience, faculty and students must agree to the following principles:

  1. An atmosphere of civility must be maintained. Faculty and students have to be respectful of each other’s views, even if they are not in agreement.
  2. Students do not have a right to remain free from encountering unwelcome or inconvenient questions. Students do have the right to hear and examine diverse opinions but within the frameworks that knowledgeable scholars have determined to be reliable and accurate.
  3. All competing ideas on a subject do not deserve to be included in a course or program. The professional judgment of faculty determines the content of courses.

Excerpted with permission from the AACU publication Academic Freedom and Educational Responsibilities. Copyright 2006 by American Association of Colleges and Universities.

The statement is available online at: http://www.aacu.org/About/statements/documents/AcademicFreedom.pdf

Distance Education

Revised 5/22/17

Purpose

Distance education (online and hybrid coursework) supports the mission of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences to expand the offerings of courses and programs that prepare individuals for the delivery of healthcare and opportunities for life-long learning. Distance education maximizes student access to courses through an electronic-based delivery system, Blackboard Learning Management System.

Verification of Student Identity in Distance Education Courses

Consistent with the statement of academic integrity and honesty, all members of the College community are held to the highest standard of integrity by engaging in words and actions that uphold the values of the College: caring, collaboration, excellence, and integrity. A student’s acceptance of admission to the College constitutes a commitment to act honorably and to uphold the policies, procedures, and behavioral expectations of the College.

In compliance with the Department of Education and all accrediting bodies, The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has established and will periodically review a process to determine that a student registered for a distance education (online or hybrid) course is the same student that participates in, completes, and receives credit for the course. Reasonable steps should be taken by the faculty member to ensure verification of student identity. This verification may be accomplished by any one or a combination of:

  1. Secure logon and passcode;
  2. Proctored examinations;
  3. Student sign in/signature for some proctored exams;
  4. Verification using photo ID; and
  5. New or other technologies and practices that are effective in identifying identity of students. (Christ College does utilize Biometric Signature ID for authenticating students enrolled in online programs)

As an institution, the College has the responsibility to act with integrity; as such, the College will make all reasonable efforts to protect student privacy in verifying student identity as well as disclose upfront any costs to be incurred by the student with respect to verification of student identity at the time of registration or enrollment.

References: The Higher Learning Commission. Commission Policies (November 2011). Policy 3.12 Verification of the Identity of Students in Distance or Correspondence Education, page 91. _

Available at http://www.ncahlc.org/Policy/commission-policy.html

Definitions for Delivery Modalities

Edited 10/5/16

Based on best practices in higher education, and in compliance with federal law and the policies of accrediting agencies, the following definitions are offered to provide clarity about the various delivery modalities used in this College.

Face-to-face: The majority of instructional time is in the classroom but may include up to 50% of online instructional time.

Hybrid: Between 50% and 75% of the instructional time for this course will be online.

Online: Between 75% and 100% of the instructional time for this course will be online. Some face-to-face instruction might be required.

NOTE: Faculty members are permitted to use a variety of delivery modalities and learning activities, including, but not limited to, online delivery, field work, off-site activities, and clinical work. Students should always refer to the syllabus for each course for an explanation of the manner in which a course will be delivered. All syllabi are posted on Blackboard one week prior to the beginning of the semester.

Reference: Ohio Department of Higher Education, Supplement (March 2010). Online Delivery.

Obtained by contacting http://www.ohiohighered.org/academic-program-approval.

Technology Requirements

Added 5/2/16; Revised 5/23/17

Access to and understanding of technology is essential for success in distance education courses. Students must have access to a reliable computer and high-speed internet connection. For more information on course-specific technology requirements, students should reference their course syllabi. For program-specific technology requirements, students should reference their respective program’s handbook, the College website (under Enrollment Steps), and/or “Technology Requirements, Recommendations and Support” in the College Support Services section of this document.

Placement Assessments

Placement assessments may be used by the College to determine a student’s academic readiness to engage in coursework necessary for completion of their chosen academic program.

Detailed information pertaining to placement assessments will be provided to students. Students will be required to complete those placement tests that are consistent with the policies in effect at the time of admission to the College. Such placement tests might vary from program to program. Previous placement test results from other schools will not be accepted.

A fee for administering examinations may be assessed.

Based on placement assessment results, students may be required to enroll in identified coursework or other defined remediation.

Placement assessment results and remediation procedures (coursework or tutorials) will be discussed with the student prior to enrollment in their first semester at the College.

Prerequisite Policy General Statement

  1. Students are expected to take College courses no later than the term they are prescribed. Students are strongly encouraged to refer to program curriculum plans as well as consult with their academic advisor.
  2. Students should work with their academic advisor to determine when courses are offered so as to properly plan their academic curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they understand the course of study once they begin their studies. The College does not assume responsibility for a student who fails to properly register for required courses.
  3. Program specific policies may require prerequisites for progression. See Program specific handbook.
  4. IMPORTANT: The Chief Academic Officer or designee must approve any deviation from this schedule.
  5. For additional information on prerequisites and co-requisites, refer to curriculum and course descriptions in this catalog.

Course Cancellation Policy

The College values quality education while maintaining fiscal responsibility. In order to be financially accountable, course sections with low enrollment will be cancelled and course sections that are not at enrollment capacity will be combined.

Time to Degree for Matriculated Students

Refer to specific Program Handbooks for “Time to Degree” timelines.

Dual Degrees

Added 8/17/17

Students may earn more than one undergraduate degree concurrently from the College. A student who completes all requirements for two or more different degrees will be awarded multiple degrees and will receive multiple diplomas. Students pursuing multiple degrees must follow the stipulations described below:

Second Associate Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 15 credit hours in residence unique to each program.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.
  • Associate and Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently
  • Earn a minimum of 136 credit hours, including a minimum of 76 credit hours in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 164 credit hours, including a minimum of 50% of credit hours for each major in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

In order to declare a second major, a student should meet with his/her advisor and complete the Dual Degree Declaration Form. The advisor will then send the form to the Registrar.

Grading Policy

Classroom Grading

Updated 2/10/17

To successfully complete any course at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, a grade of at least a “C” (2.0) or higher must be achieved. Please note a grade of “D” or lower constitutes a failing grade in either nursing or general education coursework. Assignment of a letter grade constitutes completion of the course and enrollment in the course for the entire period. Students should refer to syllabi for course grading scales.

Letter grades are assigned to the final course grade according to the following:

| Letter Grade | Grade Point Average | |————–|———————| | A | 4 | | A- | 3.67 | | B+ | 3.33 | | B | 3 | | B- | 2.67 | | C+ | 2.33 | | C | 2 | | D | 1 | | F | 0 |

Term and Cumulative Averages

Final course letter grades are converted to quality points in order to compute term and cumulative averages as defined by the Academic Grading Policy.

  • The grades a student received in a course accepted as transfer credit from another institution are not included in the computation of either term or cumulative averages.
  • Term average, computed each term a student is in the program, and is based on final grades achieved in all courses taken during that term.
  • Cumulative average, computed each term, is based on the final grades achieved in all courses required in the program up to that time.

Incomplete Course

An incomplete course is a course in which the student has not completed the required course work by the end of the term.

Criteria:

  1. Course assignments not completed by the end of the term may result in a grade of Incomplete (I). No point grade is assigned to the course. Assignment of the grade of “I” is solely at the discretion of the instructor.
  2. All incomplete coursework must be completed no later than ten (10) business days following the last day of the semester in which the “I” grade was assigned.
  3. Failure to complete all required coursework by the designated time will result in the “I” grade being permanently changed to an “F”.
  4. The “F” is then calculated into the student’s GPA.
  5. Students who have an “I” for a grade do not qualify for Academic Honors.

Assignment of Credit Hours

Edited 10/3/16

Semester credit hour allotment for a course is determined according to the following:

  • Class: 1 clock hour per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Nursing Clinical : 3 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Lab: 2 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Clock hour adjustments are made for eight (8) week courses to equate to credit hours as outlined above.

NOTES:

  • One Clock Hour = 50 minutes
  • A semester terms includes a fifteen (15) week instructional period plus one (1) week of final examinations.
  • An eight (8) week semester including eight (8) instructional weeks including final exams

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences defines clock hour and credit hour as follows:

Clock Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, a clock hour shall be defined as 50 minutes.

Credit Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, one credit hour is earned when a student has successfully completed 750 minutes of instruction within a given semester or term as defined by the institution (1 credit hour = 750 minutes).

It shall further be understood that each credit hour presumes a minimum of an additional two clock hours of work outside of the classroom.

Example: A three (3) credit course consists of three (3) clock hours (150 minutes) each week for a total 2250 minutes for a 15 week semester.

A three (3) credit course also requires that students are given six (6) clock hours of work to be done outside of the classroom or 300 minutes/week of such work. These activities could include writing assignments, reading assignments, working on problem-solving skills such as case studies, viewing videos or PowerPoint presentations, reviewing course material, observing the world around them, etc.

Online Course Example: It will be important to be able to demonstrate that the learning activities in an online course will consume a minimum of 2250 minutes of instructional time in addition to time that students will need to spend in preparation for those learning activities such as reviewing materials, preparing for tests or quizzes, preparing drafts for written assignments, etc.

References:

  1. _Department of Education, Memo GEN11-06 (October 29, 2010). Guidance to Institutions and Accrediting Agencies Regarding a Credit Hour as Defined in the Final Regulations. _Available at http://ifap.ed.gov/dpcletters/GEN1106.html
  2. _The Higher Learning Commission. Commission Policies (November 2011). Policy 3.10(a), Assignment of Credit Hours, page 54. _Available at http://www.ncahlc.org/Policy/commission-policy.html

Dean’s List of Honors

  1. All full-time students (12 semester credit hours) are eligible for Dean’s List of Honors.
  2. At the end of each semester, both the semester and cumulative GPA will be calculated.
  3. Students with a semester average of 3.50-4.00 receive Deans List of Honors.
  4. The Dean’s List of Honors designation is separate from Latin honors at graduation.
  5. Dean’s List of Honors will be noted on official transcripts for the semester the honor was awarded.

Academic Standing

Students are considered to be in good academic standing within the College provided they maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, have finalized any grade of “incomplete” within the specified period of time, and are not in violation of any academic policy such as that of academic integrity and honesty.

Early Alert System

The Early Alert System is designed to alert students if they are in danger of failing a course. The system provides the opportunity for the student and professor to collaborate in order to determine appropriate interventions for the student, engaging the student’s academic advisor as a resource.

If you are in danger of failing a course by week four of an eight-week semester or week seven of a 16-week semester, your professor will send you an email and request to meet with you to identify challenges and discuss actions for moving forward. Your academic advisor will also be notified and can serve as a resource to you for non-academic related obstacles that may be preventing your success in a course. Please take the responsibility to communicate with your professor and advisor, as appropriate, so they can work with you and help you identify resources to support your success in the course. In addition to your professor and advisor, you should consider tutoring, the Writing Center, counseling for personal and financial trouble, and other support to help you be successful in the course.

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation at the end of any semester in which the student has earned a term or cumulative grade point average of less than 2.0.

  1. A student who has been placed on academic probation will be notified via e-mail, student mailbox, and/or US Postal mail. The notification will include a plan outlining the necessary steps to return to good academic standing.
  2. In the event a student on academic probation fails to attain a 2.0 semester and cumulative average for the next semester of attendance, the student will be dismissed from the institution.

Academic Dismissal

Updated 2/16/17

Academic Dismissal refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences whose enrollment has been terminated. Academic dismissal is determined by an Associate Dean or designee and formally approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the institution.

The enrollment of a student may be terminated for any of the following reasons:

  1. Two continuous semesters of a term or cumulative GPA below a 2.0.
  2. Failure of a student to remove self from probation or suspension by the time specified.
  3. Lack of integrity, dishonesty, violation of College policies, behavior considered detrimental to safe and effective patient care (if a nursing student), or other misconduct. (Such behaviors may also invoke probation.)

SPECIAL NOTES: Reinstatement following dismissal or termination is not automatic and must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the College.

Attendance Policy

Revised 7/26/17

A primary objective of the College is the demonstration of student accountability through responsible self-directed behaviors. Consistent attendance offers the most effective opportunity for students to gain command of the concepts and material. Daily attendance, prompt arrival, demonstration of a positive attitude of respect, and cooperation are expected. Classroom attendance is expected. Individual course faculty may establish course policies that consider attendance as a factor in determining course grades. Please refer to program handbooks and course syllabi for specific attendance policies.

Attendance in Hybrid Courses

Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no-show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped for the course. Academic activities in a hybrid nursing course include face-to-face class meetings, posting in a graded discussion board or blog. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.

Attendance in Online Courses

  1. Online attendance is assessed by submission of online academic activities by the published due date and time. All due times reflect Eastern Time Zone.
  2. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.
  3. Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped from the course. Academic activities in an online nursing course include posting in a graded discussion board, a blog post, journal, or written assignment.

NOTE: A separate policy exists for “Dropping Students Who Never Attend Class.” Refer to section on Registrationand Records LINK NEEDED– General Polices in this catalog.

Non-Continuous Enrollment Policy

Revised 1/15/16; 5/8/17

A student who needs to take one (1) semester off from the scheduled coursework outlined in his/her education plan will be considered non-continuously enrolled. Non-continuously enrolled students may take no more than one (1) semester off from scheduled coursework, and return to classes will be contingent upon the space available. Notes: A student must have had at least one grade issued at the College to be eligible for non-continuous enrollment. If a student withdraws from coursework after the drop/add date (and has therefore been assigned a grade), non-continuous enrollment will begin in the following semester of scheduled coursework. If a student needs to take an extended period of time off for medical or catastrophic reasons, s/he should reference the Leave of Absence Policy.

Any student who is non-continuously enrolled must first speak with his/her academic advisor and be responsible for maintaining communication with the academic advisor regarding plans to return to classes. A non-continuously enrolled student must contact his/her academic advisor no later than eight (8) weeks prior to the start of the semester in which s/he plans to return to classes. A student returning from non-continuous enrollment must register for classes after those students who have remained continuously enrolled and followed a normal course progression. A student on non-continuous enrollment must also contact the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences eight (8) weeks prior to his/her return in order to complete any outstanding health or enrollment requirements.

Any student who fails to return from non-continuous enrollment will be automatically withdrawn from the College on the first day of the semester in which s/he is scheduled to return, and s/he must reapply in order to return to the College in a future semester. Non-Continuous Enrollment extensions beyond one semester must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer and Dean of College Support Services.

Illness in the Classroom, Lab and Clinical Settings

Medical Emergency Situation

A. For an emergency health need during scheduled nursing classes or in a clinical facility without emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will either contact the Emergency Medical System (911) to summon emergency assistance for the student, or follow policy for emergencies as outlined in the College Catalog.

B. For an emergency health need during scheduled clinical time in a clinical facility with emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee will assist in transporting the student to the emergency department.

C. The student is responsible for payment of emergency services and any treatment incurred.

Medical Nonemergency Situation in the Classroom, Lab Setting and Clinical Setting

A. Students with a nonemergency health need during class, lab or clinical time must self-identify to the faculty, clinical instructor or designee the nature of the health need. The faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will determine if the student can continue with learning activities.

B. When the student is released from class, lab or clinical, the faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e. preceptor) will assist the student in arranging transportation from the facility if needed.

C. This may count as an absence according to the classroom and clinical attendance policies.

Cadaver and Dissection Policy

Added 3/17/16

The following guidelines are established for the safe dissection of animal hearts and animal tissues along with fresh and embalmed human cadavers. Proper handling, cleaning and disinfection practices are necessary to reduce risks of transmission. The dissection and examination of the tissues are for educational and training purposes only.

A donated human cadaver represents one of the most valuable teaching tools for the study of human anatomy.

  • You are required to treat the cadavers with the respect and consideration due to a living person. The cadavers are to be referred to by their sex or tag number ONLY.
  • No signs of disrespect for the cadaver will be tolerated by any of the faculty.
  • Disrespectful behavior could result in your dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • NO outside visitors or guests are allowed into the lab at any time under any circumstances to view the cadaver.
  • Students will gain access to the cadaver only in the presence of, or through the direction of, faculty members.
  • NO photography of any kind is allowed.
  • Because of this, **no photography or video equipment **– including cell phones – of any kind are allowed in the laboratory. Leave all cell phones at home or turn them off and store in your bag as you enter the laboratory. Failure to comply with this rule can create legal problems for both you and the college and will not be tolerated. Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • Although the cadavers have been dissected prior to the laboratory session, it is the student’s responsibility to maintain the condition of the cadaver during the lab sessions.

This includes handling labels with care and using the wetting solution provided to keep the cadavers moist.

  • Wear gloves at all times when handling the cadavers and dispose of gloves properly. Hands are to be washed/disinfected after gloves are removed.

Other personal protective equipment, such as impervious gowns and face protection, is available for use.

  • Cadaveric material should NOT leave the lab under any circumstance. This includes both solid tissue and fluid waste.

All sharps and other contaminated disposable equipment is to be discarded in sharps containers.

  • Waste material should NEVER be placed down drains or thrown into common trash.
  • If a student is pregnant or intends to become pregnant during the semester, the student must contact either the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Compliance for general education and instructional support services as soon as possible.
  • Environmental Services (513-585-3031) is to be contacted to both deliver and pick-up the biohazard container for proper disposal of tissues.

Final Exam Policy

Added 3/13/2017

It is TCCNHS policy that all final exams will be administered during the specified final exam week on the College Calendar. 8-week courses will administer the final examination during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom. The College is required to provide the calculated number of instructional contact hours as stated in the syllabus. Contact hours are determined based on the definition 1 credit hour = 750 minutes. The College also states in the College Catalog that it provides 15 weeks of instruction and 1 week for final exams.

  1. If a final examination, comprehensive or not, is part of a class requirements, it must be given only during the final examination week according to the final exam schedule. Final examinations administered earlier than the appointed time, either during the prior week or during the final examination week, are not permitted.
  2. The examination schedule does not apply to 8-week courses. Final examinations in these classes are to be given during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom.
  3. Examinations will be held in the regular classroom unless students are otherwise notified. 4. When students have three or more final examinations on the same day, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the last exam or exams scheduled on that day. When students have two final exams scheduled to meet at the same time, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the later course offered that day or week. Such arrangements must be made by the in the tenth week of the semester. Students should make arrangements with the instructor of the affected course and are expected to provide evidence of these situations to qualify for exceptions. 5. Rationale must be provided to the appropriate Associate Dean if a final examination is not being administered.

The Registrar is responsible for scheduling all final examination dates, times, and rooms. The Registrar will post the final exam schedule on Blackboard.

Grade Appeal Policy and Procedures

Updated 6/24/16

The Grade Appeal Policy provides students with an avenue of redress when a final course grade is in question based on a mathematical error or grading that does not coincide with the published grading policy in the course syllabus. The procedures for appealing a final course grade are outlined below.

Procedures

Informal Appeal

A student who believes a final grade is improper should schedule an appointment to discuss this concern with the course instructor (or the Associate Dean in the instructor’s absence) within two (2) business days of the posting of the final course grade. This meeting is a pre-requisite to filing a formal grade appeal. The course instructor is required to make a good faith attempt to meet with a student who has contacted him/her to discuss a concern with a grade within three business days of when the grade was posted. Reasons for delay should be explained and documented. The course instructor should also document the meeting when it occurs.

Formal Appeal

If, after the discussion with the course instructor, a student decides to appeal the final grade, the following are the steps for the formal appeal process:

  1. Within four (4) business days after final grades are posted by the Registrar’s Office, the student will submit written appeal documentation to the Associate Dean of the Department including a statement of the reason for the appeal, previous steps taken with the course instructor to resolve the issue, and evidence supporting the student’s assertion that the grade is improper. To be considered, the grade appeal must claim one or both of the following reasons:

a. The final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus.

b. There is an alleged mathematical error in calculating the final course grade.

It is the student’s responsibility and burden to show that the final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus and/or there is a mathematical error in calculating the final course grade. Students are advised that the professional judgment of course instructors cannot be challenged and appeals made solely on that basis will not be considered.

  1. Upon receiving the written appeal documentation, the Associate Dean will notify the student of receipt of the appeal. The Associate Dean will then determine if the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1. If the appeal has not been timely filed and/or has not been properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the appeal will be dismissed and will not be heard and the student will be notified of such in writing. If the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the student will be notified that the appeal will be reviewed and also provided an explanation of these procedures.

Evidence of difficulties in arranging the initial meeting with the course instructor may be reason for the Associate Dean to forgive the untimely filing of an appeal, so long as the student made efforts to file the appeal in a reasonable amount of time after he or she was able to meet with the course instructor.

  1. The Associate Dean will send the named course instructor a copy of the student’s appeal documents so a response can be submitted. The instructor will be asked to provide appropriate documentation by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day of the request. Documents to be submitted include a description of the grading and evaluation process for the course (including the syllabus if separate), documentation of the informal grade appeal meeting, and any other documentation or rationale deemed important.
  2. The Associate Dean will provide the student with a copy of the course instructor’s response and other documentation provided and allow the student an opportunity to provide any additional information by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day.
  3. Once the course instructor has provided a response and other information and the student has had an opportunity to provide additional information, the Associate Dean will establish an appeals file of all correspondence and materials related to the appeal to be reviewed by the committee as discussed below.
  4. The Associate Dean will then appoint a committee of three (3) faculty members within the department. In constructing the committee, possible conflicts of interest should be considered and addressed.
  5. The Associate Dean will determine with the committee a date for a review of the appeal within two (2) weeks of establishing an appeals file. The appeals file will be provided to the committee at the meeting for review, discussion, and the creation of a written recommendation regarding the grade appeal.
  6. Following the meeting, the committee’s recommendation will be forwarded to the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean will notify the course instructor and the student of the recommendation in writing within one (1) business day.

Upon consideration of the committee’s recommendation, the ultimate decision to change a grade is made by the course instructor. The course instructor should notify the Associate Dean, Program Director, and student of the decision in writing within two (2) business days of receiving the committee’s recommendation. If the grade is to be changed, the Registrar should also be notified. The course instructor’s decision at this stage is final, and there is no further appeal available unless the failing grade has resulted in the student’s academic dismissal from the College.

Final Appeal in Cases Resulting in Dismissal

If a student’s failing grade remains in place following a grade appeal and the failing grade will result in dismissal from the program, the student may make a final appeal to the Chief Academic Officer (CAO) of the College. This appeal should include a short written statement explaining the appeal and attaching all previous appeal documents. This appeal must be filed with the CAO within three (3) business days after receipt of the course instructor’s final decision. The CAO may take any action he/she deems is appropriate under the circumstances of the case and will make a decision within five (5) business days of receiving the appeal, unless circumstances require a lengthier time frame. If the time frame is to be extended, the student and the involved course instructor will be notified in writing. The decision of the CAO is final. Appropriate parties, including the student, will be notified in writing of the CAO’s decision within three (3) business days of the decision being made.

**GRADE APPEAL TIMELINE **

FA2018-2019 Appreal scned needed(tables)

AdmissionsLast updated: February 11, 2019

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements

Updated 9/18/15

Admission requirements for each program can be found online. Meeting admission requirements does not guarantee admittance into the College. The College reserves the right to delete, substitute, change, or supplement any statement without prior notice.

Refer to the College website www.thechristcollege.edu for admissions information and program specific requirements.

Provisional Acceptance

Added 9/18/15

Students seeking admission into the College who do not meet one or more of the program specific admission requirements may choose to pursue provisional acceptance. The admissions committee reviews applications submitted for provisional acceptance after the conclusion of the admissions deadline. Offers of admission are offered as space permits.

In order to qualify for review by the committee an applicant must complete the following:

  • Completed and submitted online application for the program desired
  • Official, sealed transcripts from each institution attended (both high school and college)
  • Two completed reference forms (obtained from the admissions office)
  • Personal statement, outlining why the applicant should be considered for admission into the College, not exceeding one page

Readmission

Added 9/18/15; Updated 5/12/16; Updated 9/12/16

Former students seeking to be readmitted into the College must complete the following:

  • Submit a current online application
  • Submit official transcripts from all institutions they have attended (except for TCCNHS)
  • Meet the current admission requirements for the program into which they are seeking admission
  • Personal statement, outlining why you are seeking readmission, not exceeding one page
  • All previous balances at the College must be settled before the application deadline.

The Admissions Committee and/or the applicable Associate Dean review the application. Readmission into the College is not guaranteed and is handled on a case-by-case basis. All students who are granted readmission fall under the current policies and graduation requirements. This may result in loss of prior credit due to curriculum changes that have taken place during the lapse of enrollment.

Students who have been dismissed from a nursing program due to two nursing course failures must wait 2 years before reapplying to the nursing program.

Matriculation Fee Policy

Added 9/12/16

Upon receiving a letter of admission into The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, a student is given 30 days in order to pay the matriculation fee to hold their seat in the upcoming class. This is a non-refundable enrollment fee that is designed to help offset the cost of enrolling new students into the college. This fee is waived for applicants to the RN-BSN Completion and Health Care Administration degrees under the following circumstances:

  • The student is an alumni from The Christ Hospital School of Nursing or The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences
  • The student is an active employee of The Christ Hospital Health Network

Opt-out Disclosure

Students have the right to restrict the release of promotional photographs, interviews, or videos at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (hereafter “TCCNHS”). TCCNHS may use or post with the purpose of promoting TCCNHS without written consent, unless you have advised TCCNHS to the contrary in accordance with TCCNHS procedures. The primary purpose of this disclosure is to allow TCCNHS to include photographs, videos or interviews in school publications, college website, and social media sites. Examples include:

  • Publications and marketing materials, such the annual college view book
  • Photographs, videos, interviews for promotional print and online publications
  • Photos, videos, or interviews for social media sites

Any matriculated student who wishes to be excluded from such publications and online postings should write a letter, signed and dated, expressing their “opt-out” preference. Letters should be mailed to:

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences Attn: Marketing & Recruitment Office 2139 Auburn Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45219

Financial AidLast updated: February 11, 2019

The Financial Aid Office at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences assists students and parents to successfully navigate the financial aid process from beginning to end. Financial aid is intended to assist students who otherwise would be unable to finance their education. All financial aid in the form of federal loans and grants is administered by the Financial Aid Office under the policies established by the Federal and State governmental guidelines. Eligibility is based on demonstrated financial need of the student and/or the student’s family and on registered credit hours. Please refer to the Financial Aid Policies and Procedures at www.thechristcollege.edu/financialaid for additional information.

Student Grade Level

Students attending the College will be classified by grade level based upon the number of credit hours earned. Transfer credit hours that have been officially accepted by the College will be counted towards a student’s earned hours when determining grade level.

Grade Level Classification:

Freshman Level: 1-30 credit hours earned

Sophomore Level: 31-60 credit hours earned

Junior Level: 61-90 credit hours earned

Senior Level: 91-120 credit hours earned

SPECIAL NOTE: Eligibility for federal, state, and institutional aid will be determined in part by total credit hours earned by the student.

Disbursements and Refunds

Financial aid is first applied to all outstanding balances owed to the College by the student for each semester. Financial aid funds are applied each semester after the 100% refund period of the semester. The amount of the award applied to tuition costs is determined in part by the amount of registered credit hours for each student in each semester. Student loan proceeds will not be received and disbursed by the College until the student has electronically signed their Master Promissory Note (MPN) and has met all other eligibility requirements.

If financial aid funds are more than enough to cover all outstanding balances owed to the College for the semester then a student may be eligible for a refund of student financial aid funds. Refund checks will be processed on a weekly basis after financial aid funds have been fully disbursed and the student has met all eligibility requirements. Eligible student refund checks will be mailed directly to the student at the address on file with the College, no exceptions.

Any changes to a student’s registered hours in a semester or financial aid record can delay the disbursement of funds and the processing and/or receipt of student refunds. In the event a student receives a refund of financial aid funds and subsequently becomes ineligible for the refund, the student is responsible for repaying the College for the amount they are no longer eligible to receive.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Overview

Any student receiving any type of federal, state or institutional aid is required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress to continue to receive financial aid at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Federal regulations stipulate that each student’s entire academic record be reviewed for Satisfactory Academic Progress, including terms for which a student did not receive financial aid.

Requirements

a. Eligibility: To be eligible for financial aid at TCCNHS, students must meet all three (3) criteria defined below to qualify for the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requirement.

b. GPA Requirement: Maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher each academic semester or session to meet SAP progress requirements.

c. Credit Completion Requirement (CCR): A student must earn hours equal to at least 67% of the total cumulative hours attempted for after each academic semester in which they are enrolled with grades of “A,” “B,” “C” to remain in good SAP standing. Example: John takes 16 credit hours and fails two courses. Course #1 is a 3-credit hour course, and course #2 is a 1-credit hour course. John would satisfy this component of the satisfactory academic progress requirement because he has earned 12 of 16 credits or 75% of hours attempted (12 ÷ 16 = 75).

d. Maximum Time Limit or Time to Degree: Students must complete their programs of study before they have attempted more than 150% of the published required credit hours for the degree program. This equates to 150% of the total number of credit hours. Students that exceed 150% of the hours attempted will not be eligible for financial aid.

Example One: 71 credit hours are required to obtain the Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing. In this case, 71 total credit hours X 1.50 or 150% = 106.5 hours.

Example Two: Allen is enrolled at TCCNHS for 3 years. Some semesters he has gone full-time (12-19 hours) while others he has dropped below full-time status. After applying for permission to go beyond three years, in the fall semester of his fourth year, Allen will reach 112 hours. Because he has exceeded the allowable limit (106.5 hours), Allen will no longer receive financial aid at The Christ College.

Evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress

A student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is reviewed once every academic semester. At each point in time, a student will be assigned one of four designations. Note that these statuses may be in addition to other types of academic or disciplinary probation.

  1. Good Standing: Student continues to receive financial aid because he or she has demonstrated satisfactory academic progress.
  2. Financial Aid Warning Status: A student will continue to receive financial aid for the next semester, but must complete SAP standards by the end of the semester in which he/she was on warning.
  3. Financial Aid Probationary Status: A student who was on “Warning Status” in the prior semester and failed to meet the SAP standards. Student will only be eligible for financial aid after appealing the loss of financial aid and financial aid eligibility being reinstated by the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid.
  4. Financial Aid Termination Status: Student will no longer continue to receive financial aid until such time as he or she demonstrates satisfactory academic progress.

Failure to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Actions Taken for Failure to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students will be notified by the Financial Aid office of actions taken for failure to meet satisfactory academic progress.

  1. Financial Aid Warning Status a. Students who do not meet the above criteria after being in good standing will be placed on “warning” and will continue to receive financial aid.
  2. Financial Aid Probationary Status a. Students not meeting the above criteria for two consecutive semesters will be placed on Financial Aid Probationary Status (FAPS) and will not have access to financial aid eligibility. After being placed on probation students must appeal to the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid for reinstatement of their financial aid eligibility. If the appeal is granted, financial aid eligibility will be reinstated and the student must meet the SAP criteria and any other stipulations designated by the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid as part of the reinstatement.
  3. Financial Aid Termination Status a. Students who fail to meet the above criteria for three consecutive semesters or fail to meet the standards established as part of their probationary reinstatement will no longer receive federal (Title IV), state, and institutional assistance until he or she meets all satisfactory academic progress criteria. Students may appeal their termination status to the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid by following the financial aid appeal process.

Financial Aid Appeal Process

a. Appeal and Reinstatement:

  1. Students wishing to regain financial aid eligibility after being placed on “probation status” must appeal their probation status by submitting a Financial Aid Appeal Form within in five (5) business days of receiving the official probation status notification. Only the following documented circumstances will be considered for an appeal: > * Death of a relative > * Injury or illness of the student > * Other special circumstances
  2. Once the form and all appropriate documentation have been completed, the student submits the original form to the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid or designee. Students must provide information regarding why they failed to meet the SAP criteria and what has changed in their situation that will allow them to meet the SAP criteria by the next evaluation period. The director or designee provides the students with a time stamped copy for his or her files.
  3. The appeal is reviewed by a committee comprised of the following individuals and a decision is made to either accept or reject the appeal: > * Director of Admissions and Financial Aid > * Registrar/Bursar > * College Designee
  4. Once the appeal committee has issued its decision, the student has the option of appealing that committee’s decision to the Dean of Enrollment Management within five (5) business days of receiving the notification of the appeal status. The Dean of Enrollment Management will review and communicate whether he or she upholds or rejects the committee’s decision. The decision of the Dean of Enrollment Management is final.

Other Factors Affecting Satisfactory Academic Progress

a. Withdrawals, incomplete courses, repeated courses, and transfer credits count towards a student’s compliance with the CGPA, completion rate and maximum time frame standards of this policy. Re-evaluation of the maximum time frame will be considered for individual situations.

Federal Withdrawal Refund Policy Title IV Funds

Withdrawal from Class and Return of Funds

When a student who has received federal financial aid funds (Title IV funds) withdraws from the College during a semester, federal regulations require the College to determine the amount of “unearned” funds that must be returned to the federal aid programs. This requirement is effective only if the student completely terminates enrollment (i.e., cancels his/her registration, withdraws, or is dismissed) or stops attending classes before completing more than 60 percent of the semester.

The amount of Title IV funds “earned” is determined by multiplying the total amount of Title IV aid (other than federal work-study) for which the student qualified during the semester by the percentage of time the student was enrolled during the semester. The percentage of time enrolled is determined by dividing the number of calendar days enrolled (through the withdrawal date) by the total number of calendar days in the semester (less any scheduled break of 5 or more days). The difference between “earned” funds and total Title IV funds awarded is “unearned” and must be refunded. Once a student has completed more than 60% of the semester, he or she earns 100% of the Title IV funds awarded for the semester.

The Unearned Amount of Title IV aid must be returned to the applicable Title IV aid programs in the following order:

  1. Direct Unsubsidized Loan
  2. Direct Subsidized Loan
  3. Direct PLUS Loan
  4. Pell Grant
  5. ACG Grant
  6. Other Title IV aid

State and Institutional Refund Policy

State and institutional funds will be adjusted whenever a student drops credit hours or withdraws completely during the semester. Those funds must be refunded to either the State (per regulations) or to the College. Institutional funds will be refunded based upon the Title IV Withdrawal Refund schedule when appropriate.

Ohio College Opportunity Grant Refund Policy

Edited 10/5/16

The purpose of this document is to describe the reimbursement policies campuses are required to follow regarding the Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) program. The OCOG reimbursement policies go into effect beginning in AY 2006-2007, and are analogous to those used for the Ohio Instructional Grant (OIG) program.

Calculating an OCOG Refund for Students Who Withdraw from All of Their Courses at the Institution

If a student withdraws from the institution during an academic term, the amount of the OCOG refund will be determined by the refund schedule of the institution. The total refund as a percent of the total instructional and general fees charged to the student shall constitute the percent of the OCOG award for the term which is to be refunded to the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

For example, if a student withdraws and is entitled to a refund of 85 percent of the total instructional and general fees charged for the term, the institution must refund 85 percent of the student’s OCOG allotment for the term to the Ohio Department of Higher Education. If a student withdraws and is entitled to a refund of 100 percent of the total instructional and general fees charged for the term, the institution must refund 100 percent of the student’s OCOG allotment for the term to the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

Calculating an OCOG Refund for Students Who Drop Below 12 Credit Hours (or the Equivalent)

If a student reduces his or her enrollment to three-quarters time, one-half time, or less than half-time prior to an institution’s census or “freeze” date, the OCOG allotment for the term must be reduced to the corresponding enrollment level.

If a student drops below 12 credit hours after the institution’s freeze date, but during the institution’s refund period, the amount of the OCOG refund will be determined by the percentage reduction in the student’s actual fee charges.

For example, if a student drops from 12 credit hours with tuition/fee charges of $450 to 8 credit hours with tuition/fee charges of $340, the tuition fee reduction would be $110 or 24 percent. Consequently, the institution would refund 24 percent of the student’s OCOG allotment for that term to the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

The student will be billed and financially responsible for any and all payment(s) due to the College resulting from the above policies.

Examples of Return of Funds calculations are available in the Financial Aid Office.

Financial Aid Book Voucher Policy

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (TCCNHS) together with Joseph-Beth Booksellers have developed the following guidelines and procedures for students who wish to use their anticipated financial aid refund to purchase required and recommended books and supplies. Eligible students may only receive a book voucher at the Financial Aid Office.

Book Voucher Eligibility

To be eligible for a TCCNHS Book Voucher, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Have a valid FAFSA on file with TCCNHS
  2. Have completed verification process with the financial aid office if applicable.
  3. Have signed a master promissory note (MPN) for Direct Student Loans if applicable.
  4. Have a completed financial aid file.
  5. Be in good standing of Academic and Financial Aid SAP policies.
  6. Have registered for a minimum of 6 credit hours.
  7. Have financial aid in excess of tuition charges for the semester.
  8. Have no outstanding balances owed to the College for the current or previous semesters.

Book Voucher Guidelines

  1. Only one book voucher per student.
  2. Book vouchers are only available for fall, spring and summer semesters.
  3. Book vouchers expire at close of business on the final day of the 100% refund period.
  4. No book vouchers will be given after the final day of the 100% refund period.
  5. Can receive up to $1000 in a book voucher depending on individual eligibility. A minimum of $100 must be available in a pending refund to process a book voucher.
  6. Students are not permitted to purchase books or supplies for other students.
  7. Only required or recommended books and supplies for the currently enrolled semester will be permitted.
  8. Book vouchers must be used at the Joseph-Beth at Christ Hospital store only to purchase required or recommended books and supplies.
  9. At time of purchase, student must show Joseph-Beth Booksellers your College ID badge or photo ID.
  10. Only the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid or approved college designee are authorized to sign the TCCNHS Book Voucher Form.

Book Voucher Process

  1. Book Voucher Forms are available at the Financial Aid Office beginning one week prior to the start of the semester or at designated dates as determined by TCCNHS in conjunction with Joseph-Beth.
  2. Book voucher requests will not be processed by email or phone. Requests must be made in person at the Financial Aid Office.
  3. A book and supplies fee will be charged to the student account for the amount invoiced by Joseph-Beth Booksellers.
  4. The completed book voucher should be considered as cash and if a student misplaces the voucher or loses the voucher, another voucher will not be issued.
  5. For your first purchase at Joseph-Beth at the Christ Hospital store, you will be required to give them your Financial Aid voucher. They will set up an account in your name and in return, provide you with a Special Payment Card with the allotted financial aid loaded on the card. Each time you purchase, you will need to pay with this card. This is considered cash and if a student misplaces the Payment Card, another voucher will not be issued.
  6. The Joseph-Beth Payment Card can only be used at Joseph-Beth at Christ Hospital and the student must present their College ID or photo ID at the time of purchase.
  7. Joseph-Beth Booksellers will reconcile with TCCNHS approximately 30 days after the start of the semesters. Approved book vouchers will expire the day after the 100% tuition refund schedule of the College.

Financial Aid Office Code of Conduct

In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), institutions of higher learning are to develop and comply with a code of conduct with regards to the administration of educational student loans. The purpose of this code is to prohibit conflict of interest between the makers of these loans and personnel of the College. The College’s primary commitment with respect to student loans is to ensure that borrower benefits and services are in the best interest of the student and parent borrowers.

The following provisions will serve as a guide in meeting this requirement:

  1. The College is prohibited from entering into any revenue sharing arrangement with any lender. Revenue sharing arrangement is defined as an arrangement between a covered institution and a lender under which:
  • A lender provides or issues educational student loans to students or families of such students attending the institution; and The institution recommends the lender or loan product of the lender
  • and, in exchange, the lender pays a fee or provides other material benefits, including revenue or profit sharing, to the institution.
  1. Employees of the financial aid office or others who otherwise have responsibilities with respect to educational student loans must not solicit or accepts gifts from a lender, guarantor, or a loan service provider. The term gift means any gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, loan, or other item having a monetary value more than a de minimus amount. The term includes a gift of services, transportation, lodging, or meals, whether provided in kind, by purchase of a ticket, payment in advance, or reimbursement after an expense is incurred.
  2. Financial Aid personnel or other College personnel who are otherwise responsible with respect to educational student loans must not accept from any lender or affiliate of any lender any fee, payment, or other financial benefit as compensation for any type of consulting arrangement or other contract to provide services to a lender for or on behalf of a lender relating to educational student loans.
  3. The College will not assign, through award packaging or other methods, lenders to any first time borrower; or refuse to certify or delay the certification of any loan based on the borrower’s selection of a particular lender or guaranty agency.
  4. The College will not request or accept from any lender any offer of funds to be used for private education loans to students in exchange for the institution providing concessions or promises regarding providing the lender with:
  • A specific number of educational student loans;
  • A specific loan volume for such lender; or
  • A preferred lender arrangement for such loans.
  1. The College will not request or accept from any lender any assistance with financial aid office staffing.
  2. Any College financial aid office personnel or anyone else who has educational student loan responsibilities who serves on an advisory board for a lender or guarantor will not receive anything of value from the lender or guarantor except reimbursement for reasonable expenses incurred while serving on such advisory board, commission or group.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Student Rights:

  • You have a right to know the name of a school’s accrediting organization.
  • You have a right to know about a school’s program; it’s instructional, laboratory, and other physical facilities and its faculty.
  • You have a right to know what the cost is of attending and what the school’s policy is on refunds to students who withdraw from the College.
  • You have the right to know what financial aid programs are available at your school.
  • You have the right to know the deadlines for submitting applications for each of the financial aid programs available.
  • You have the right to know how financial aid will be distributed, how decisions on that distribution are made, and the basis for these decisions.
  • You have the right to know how your financial need was determined. This includes how costs for tuition and fees, room and board, transportation, books and supplies, personal and miscellaneous expenses are considered in your budget.
  • You have the right to know what resources (parental contribution, other financial aid, your assets) were considered in the calculation of your need.
  • You have the right to know how much of your financial need, as determined by the institution, has been met.
  • You have the right to request an explanation of the various programs in your student aid package.
  • You have the right to know what portion of the financial aid you received must be repaid and what portion is grant aid. If the aid is on a loan, you have the right to know what the interest rate is on the loan, the total amount that must be repaid, the payback procedures, the length of time you have to repay the loan, and when repayment is to begin.
  • You have the right to know how the school determines whether you are making satisfactory progress and what happens if you are not satisfactorily completing the requirements.

Student Responsibilities:

  • When you sign a promissory note, you are agreeing to repay according to the terms of the note. This note is a legally binding document. This commitment to repay means that, except in cases of cancellation, you will have to pay back the loan–even if you do not complete your education, are not able to get a job after you complete the program, you are dissatisfied with, or do not receive, the educational or other services you purchased from your school.
  • You must make payment on your loan even if you do not receive a bill. Billing statements (or coupon books) are sent, as a convenience to the borrower, but not receiving them does not relieve you of your obligation to make payments.
  • You must attend an exit interview if you accepted any loans and leave school before graduation.

Registration and RecordsLast updated: February 11, 2019

The Office of Registration and Records is responsible for providing efficient, timely, and personable service to students, while maintaining accurate student academic records. The Registrar processes grades and transcripts, prepares credit evaluations and notifies students on transfer credit issues, oversees the registration process, and enrollment verifications. The Registrar coordinates graduation, certifies degree completions, posts degrees, processes diplomas, and is the FERPA Compliance Officer for the College.

Registration

Students are required to register for courses before each academic term. Prior to each registration period, course listings, specific registration dates, and registration instructions are posted online in Blackboard. Students may not register for a course they are currently enrolled in for the following semester until official grades are posted in SONISWeb.

During the advising period held prior to registration, a currently enrolled student meets with his/her advisor to review the student’s progress toward program requirements. Students are required to meet with their advisor prior to registration and will be placed on a “Registration Hold” if they do not meet with their advisor during this period and will remain on hold until the meeting occurs. The student’s advisor must remove the Online Registration Hold to enable the student to register.

Registration is available through SONISWeb. Registration time is based on the student’s classification (sophomore, freshman, and non-degree). After a student has registered online, a student should print a copy of their class schedule to verify that the online registration process was completed.

To view class schedule information, registration dates and instructions, and forms used for registration, add-drop, changing name or address, and requesting official transcripts, please refer to the College’s Registrar/Bursar page on Blackboard: thechristcollege.Blackboard.com.

Please note that The College also reserves the right to cancel courses and course sections, even after registration has taken place, if there is low enrollment, the unavailability of a qualified faculty person, the lack of a clinical site, or other extenuating circumstances. Every effort will be made to place students in other sections of the same course if this is possible.

Requesting Official Transcripts

Official transcripts are released from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences when written authorization is received and the student’s financial obligations to the College have been met. To access a printable Official Transcript Request form, please refer to the College website at www.thechristcollege.edu, or visit the Registrar/Bursar page in Blackboard: thechristcollege.Blackboard.com.

Transferring Credit to Other Colleges

A student attempting to transfer credits received at TCCNHS to another institution should check that institution’s policies and discuss this with its admissions personnel. Whether the credits earned at TCCNHS will transfer to a particular institution is solely a function of that institution’s policies and practices.

Transfer Credits to The Christ College

Transfer Credit

Transfer Credit (sometimes referred to as Advance Standing) means that a student receives credit for a TCCNHS course by using one of the methods listed below to demonstrate successful completion of appropriate prior academic credit and/or work experience.

Updated 9/16/15; Revised 10/1/15; Revised 3/17/16; Updated 10/19/16; Updated 1/24/17; Updated 4/20/17

Transfer Credit for Completed College Courses

TCCNHS values the previous educational experiences of its applicants and matriculating students. Accordingly, transfer credits may be accepted for successfully completed college courses with content that is equivalent to TCCNHS’s curriculum. Our commitment to providing a curriculum that facilitates intellectual and professional growth, in addition to preparing competent well-rounded graduates, necessitates the following requirements relevant to considering transfer of college credits:

  1. Applicants must meet TCCNHS‘s current standards for regularly enrolled students.
  2. Transfer credit will only be evaluated based upon an official transcript. International transcripts must be evaluated by World Education Services (http://www.wes.org/) and the WES report must be submitted to TCCNHS. Appropriate and complete documentation is required for full consideration of any transfer credit.
  3. All previous college-level coursework must have been completed with a grade of 2.0 “C” or better. Awarded transfer credit grades are not reflected on the student’s TCCNHS transcript or grade point average (GPA).

a) Preference is given first to credits earned at institutions of higher learning that are accredited by one of the six regional accrediting associations recognized by the United States Department of Education.

b) Credits may be approved from institutions with accreditation from Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) approved accrediting bodies.

c) Credits may be approved from institutions with an articulation agreement with TCCNHS.

d) TCCNHS may request course syllabi on a case-by-case review before any transfer of credit is awarded. Other exceptions may be made as determined by the Chief Academic Officer.

e) Credits may be accepted from other institutions that are not regionally accredited or have accreditations from CHEA or other accrediting bodies. Case-by-case review of course syllabi may be requested before any transfer credit takes place.

  1. All transfer coursework must be documented on or before the first day of classes in which the student is enrolled as a degree-seeking student.
  2. The Department of Nursing requires students seeking to transfer previous nursing coursework must submit course syllabi for the nursing course. The Program Director will review the course syllabi and the official transcript to determine transfer credit. Any student with two or more previous nursing course failures is ineligible for consideration for transfer of nursing course credits.
  3. The Department of Arts and Sciences Transfer Credit Policy states that credits in the Arts and Sciences (excluding Natural and Lab Sciences and English Composition) must have been earned within ten (10) years prior to enrollment. Credits earned in the Natural and Lab Sciences must have been earned within five (5) years prior to enrollment. Credits transferring into the RN-BSN, Health Care Administration (HCA) and General Studies programs are not subject to these requirements. Effective with students entering fall semester 2016. General education credits transferring into the Medical Assisting program are not subject to these requirements except for MAT 102 or equivalent which must have been earned within ten (10) years prior to enrollment, and BIO 102 or equivalent which must have been earned within five (5) years prior to enrollment. Exceptions can be made by the Registrar’s office in consultation with the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and faculty. You may also refer to additional transfer credit policies found in the College Catalog.
  4. Students may be required to complete a specified number of credit hours of Arts and Sciences courses at TCCNHS to satisfy degree completion requirements. Refer to the Curriculum and Course Descriptions section for more information.
  5. TCCNHS reserves the right to determine the acceptability of transfer credits in accord with its regulatory bodies and College policies.
  6. TCCNHS cannot guarantee that course credit taken at the College will transfer to other schools. Acceptance of credits transferred to another institution is solely a function of the other institution’s transfer credit policies.

Military Credit

TCCNHS may award credits as recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE), as published in “The Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services,” for appropriate equivalent educational experiences provided by the armed forces.

  1. Students who wish to establish credit for military training should submit to the Registration and Records Office a copy of their DD214, Armed Forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge, OR their DD295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experiences During Military Services.
  2. Course Completion Certificates may be used to supplement other records or when service schools are not reflected on the DD-214 or 295.
  3. An official AARTS Transcript (Army/ACE Registry Transcript Service) is available to Army enlisted, active duty personnel and veterans who entered the service after October 1, 1981. AARTS transcripts can be ordered at http://aarts.army.mil/.
  4. An official SMART transcript (Sailor/Marine ACE Registry Transcript) is available to active duty and reserve Sailors and Marines, Navy veterans who separated or retired after January 1975, and Marines who separated or retired on or after January 1990. To receive further information or to order a transcript, visit https://smart.navy.mil/smart/welcome.do
  5. TCCNHS also accepts credits earned through the DSST for active military personnel. Transcripts may be ordered from Prometric, ATTN: DSST/CLEP Transcripts, 1260 Energy Lane, St. Paul, MN 55108. 877-471-9860 (toll free)

Training Programs/Extra-Institutional Learning

TCCNHS may award credit as recommended by ACE’s National Guide to College Credit for Workforce Training. Students may present transcripts from ACE’s College Credit Recommendation Service (CREDIT). To access the CREDIT Online Transcript System go to: https://www2.acenet.edu/credit/?fuseaction=transcripts.main

TCCNHS may also award credit based on the recommendation of The New York State Board of Regents National College Credit Recommendation Program.

Credit for Experiential Learning

Credit may be awarded from a combination of knowledge and skills gained from work/life experience, non-credit courses, seminar training, volunteer work, and workshops. To receive credit, a student must present verifiable, official documentation to prove his/her experiences fully satisfy the learning outcomes for a particular course (e.g., employer letter on company letterhead, official certificates, etc.).

  1. The Associate Dean of that course’s division, in collaboration with faculty, will review the documentation provided by the student to decide whether course credit will be awarded for the experiential learning.
  2. The course number, title, credit hours and the note “Credit for Experiential Learning” will be recorded on the transcript.
  3. Credit for Experiential Learning will only be awarded to currently matriculated students while they are enrolled at the college.
  4. Credit for Experiential Learning does not satisfy the residency requirement.
  5. Credit for Experiential Learning awarded by our college is not necessarily transferable to other institutions and/or accrediting bodies. Please check their policies.
  6. Application for Experiential Learning credit may not be made while the applicant is enrolled in the course in question.
  7. Experiential Learning credit is not granted for nursing courses.
  8. Experiential Learning credit may not exceed 16 hours for any degree program..

Credit by Examination

Standardized exams may be taken for academic credit. A student must obtain the predefined equivalent grade per the College Board Exam criteria (Advanced Placement and CLEP) or International Baccalaureate Program (IB). For exams taken through the College Board (Advancement Placement and CLEP) and International Baccalaureate Program, the credits are transferred and are recorded into the total earned hours. Awarded credits are reflected on the student’s TCCNHS transcripts; however, they are not reflected in the student’s grade point average (GPA).

Advanced Placement (AP)

To be awarded college credit for Advanced Placement courses taken in high school, a student must obtain a predefined equivalent score of 3 or higher per the College Board Exam criteria. For exams taken through the College Board the credits are transferred to TCCNHS and are recorded as total earned hours.

TCCNHS reserves the right to change, at any time and without notice, the criteria for awarding Advanced Placement credit in any or all subject areas. For more information go to: http://professionals.collegeboard.com/testing/ap/scores

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

To be awarded college credit for successful completion of a CLEP exam, a student must obtain a predefined equivalent score or higher listed in the table below per the College Board Exam criteria. For exams taken through the College Board the credits are transferred to TCCNHS and are recorded as total earned hours.

CLEP Exams Scoring Policy - Endorsed Course Alignment
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature Score of 59 and above
Arts and Humanities Elective Credit (3 Hours)
Calculus Score of 64 and above
College Mathematics Score of 57 and above
General Elective Credit (3 Hours)
Humanities Score of 55 and
Arts and Humanities Elective Credit (3 Hours)
Pre-Calculus Score of 61 and above
College Algebra
Social Sciences and History Score of 62 and above
Social and Behavioral Science Elective Credit (3 Hours)

CLEP courses and exams are subject to revision on a yearly basis. Therefore, TCCNHS reserves the right to change, at any time and without notice, the criteria for awarding CLEP credit in any or all subject areas. For more information go to http://clep.collegeboard.org

International Baccalaureate Program (IB)

To be awarded college credit for International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses taken in high school, a student must obtain a predefined equivalent score of 4 or higher per the International Baccalaureate Higher Level examination criteria. For Higher Level examinations taken through the IB Program, the credits are transferred to TCCNHS and are recorded as total earned hours.

TCCNHS reserves the right to change, at any time and without notice, the criteria for awarding IB Program credit in any or all subject areas. For more information go to http://www.ibo.org/informationfor/alumni/transcripts

Academic Renewal

  1. Purpose

Academic Renewal permits a former student to resume study without being penalized for his or her unsatisfactory academic performance. All courses with grades less than a 2.0 © will appear on the transcript but will not be calculated into the GPA. Credit earned at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences with a grade of less than a 2.0 © will not satisfy course completion requirements.

  1. Eligibility

a. Academic renewal may be used once.

b. To qualify for academic renewal, a former degree candidate, provisional student, or non-degree student, must (1) have a cumulative grade point average below a 2.0; and (2) have taken no course work at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences for a minimum of two (2) calendar years. Enrollment in any credit course through any Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences’ course delivery system disrupts the required two year non-enrollment period, even if the student withdrew from the course(s). Students must seek academic renewal prior to resuming enrollment.

c. A student may apply for academic renewal status by filing a “Letter of Intent” addressed directly to the Chief Academic Officer of the College. This letter should be filed no later than the Friday of the 8th week of the term preceding the semester or session in which enrollment is desired.

d. The Chief Academic Officer will review the Academic Renewal status request. If denied, the decision is final. If granted, the following criteria must be observed:

  1. The student must enroll for a minimum of six (6) semester credits hours as specified by the Chief Academic Officer. This will be noted as a probationary period for the student.

  2. Once the probationary period has ended, the student must have achieved a minimum GPA of 2.75 or higher and may not have failed or withdrawn from any courses. Additionally, the student must be free of any other designations (such as non-academic or academic sanctions assigned during the probationary period).

e. If the student successfully completes all criteria outlined during the probationary period, he or she will receive Academic Renewal status, which will appear as “Academic Renewal Granted” on the transcript.

f. All college credits earned during the time between the time the student left the institution and prior to granting of the academic renewal are not transferable into the College.

g. Students are required to meet the current curriculum plan in place at time of academic renewal.

Change of Majors

Added 12/20/16

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has developed a policy that enables students to move more freely among majors. However, there is limited availability and program entrance requirements that must be met in restricted majors.

Restricted Majors Bachelor of Science in Nursing:

Students interested in transferring to nursing must have a 2.75 minimum Christ College GPA. Admission is very competitive and dependent upon space available in the major at the time of the request. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission into the major. The transfer request will be sent to the Admission Committee for final determination or denial of admission.

Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing:

Students are not eligible to transfer into the RN-BSN program. The admission requirements state students must have successfully completed a pre-licensure nursing program and have obtained nursing licensure.

Unrestricted Majors

Associate of Science in General Studies; Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration Unrestricted majors have year-round admissions.

Students must be in good academic standing (i.e. GPA must be ≥ 2.0). If a student’s GPA is less than 2.0, the student may have one semester on probation to raise his/her GPA to ≥ 2.0.

Procedure for Change of Major:

  1. Consult with your Academic Advisor: The College is committed to ensuring that all students are making informed decisions regarding their academic interests and their professional goals and objectives.
  2. Complete the Change of Major form provided by the Academic Advisor.
  3. Submit the Change of Major form to the Registrar.
  4. Your paperwork will be processed and major changed within 5 days of submission for unrestricted majors.
  5. You will be notified within two weeks of submission of paperwork for acceptance or denial into a restricted major.

Adding and Dropping Courses

Adding a Course

Adding a course is defined as adding an additional course after the student’s initial registration for classes is completed. These guidelines must be followed for adding a course:

  1. A student may add an open course during the first six (6) business days of a session (Fall, Spring, or Summer).

  2. No courses may be added after this time without express permission of the appropriate Academic Dean or designee and course/clinical instructor.

  3. Adding a course will require submission of a course Drop/Add Form. Forms can be obtained from the Office of Registration and Records.

Dropping a Course

Dropping a course is defined as removing a course from a student’s schedule after the initial registration period. These guidelines must be followed with regard to dropping a course:

  1. Any course may be dropped from the schedule through the first six (6) business days of a session (Fall, Spring, or Summer) without the instructor’s permission and with no grade or other designation noted on the student’s transcript.

  2. Dropping a course will require submission of a course Drop/Add Form. Forms can be obtained from the Office of Registration and Records.

  3. Beginning on the seventh (7th) business day of a session (Fall, Spring, or Summer), the course withdrawal policy will apply.

Course Credit Hour Load Maximums

Revised 7/21/17

If a student wishes to enroll in 18 or more credits in a given semester, the student must meet with their academic advisor and discuss their ability to take on a course load above the maximum limit prior to the beginning of the registration period. . The academic advisor will notify the Registrar and student if permission was granted to take the requested hours, or will notify the appropriate program director or associate dean and the student if permission was denied.

Students do have the right to file a grievance if they feel that their request has not received due consideration to the appropriate program director or associate dean. The program director or associate dean will respond to the student’s grievance in writing within five business days.

No Show Policy for Dropping Students

The No Show Policy for Dropping Students applies to persons who never attend class.

Updated 10/5/15

Designated Period

Designated period is defined as the last day for 100% tuition refund as stated on the Academic Calendar for eight (8) week and sixteen (16) week semesters.

Classes and Clinical

Faculty will drop a student from the class if the student does not attend at least one class session during the designated period. Students who contact the instructor and provide a justification for not participating in class will be permitted to remain in the class at the instructor’s discretion. At the end of the designated period, faculty should email the Registrar and Financial Aid Officer to drop any students who remain on their roster but have not attended at least one class session during the designated period.

Distance Education Classes

Faculty will drop a student from a distance education class if a student does not log-on to the Blackboard course during the designated period. Students who contact the instructor and provide a justification for not participating in class will be permitted to remain in the class at the instructor’s discretion. At the end of the designated period, faculty should email the Registrar and Financial Aid Officer to drop any students who remain on their roster but have not logged on to Blackboard during the designated period.

Include Attendance Policy in Course Syllabus

All faculty are to include a statement of their attendance policy in each course syllabus. The statement must include information as to when the faculty member will drop a student from the class who never attended. It is important that the attendance policy in the course syllabus also indicates that the instructor will initiate unofficial withdrawal procedures for any student who ceases attendance after the designated period.

Effect of Drop for Never Attending

Students dropped from class for never attending will be deleted from rolls as though they had never registered. These students will not receive a grade of “W” and will not be counted in any official enrollment. Financial aid funds will be adjusted according to Federal, State, and institutional policies and may result in a balance owed to the College.

Appeal Process

Students who have been deleted from a class, but believe they have mitigating circumstances that warrant reversing the decision to drop, may appeal to the instructor. However, the appeal must be initiated no later than the week following the designated period.

Repeating a Course with Grade Replacement

Revised 7/26/17

  1. A student may repeat a course one time with the last grade replacing the original grade.

  2. The last grade always prevails and the original grade is removed from the GPA computation; however, the original grade remains on the transcript. In instances where the College must determine a student’s academic fitness, any course that is repeated as a result of failure may still factor into decisions related to academic probation, suspension or dismissal.

Withdrawals

Course Withdrawal

A student who has been enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences who voluntarily drops a course for academic or personal reasons after the official drop/add date has passed.

a. Withdrawal “W”: Withdrawal prior to the end of mid-term week. Withdrawal Deadline: To receive a “W”, a student must complete and submit withdrawal form(s) no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday of the eight (8th) week of a sixteen (16) week semester or the fourth (4th) week of an eight (8) week semester. See appropriate Program Handbook for specific program exceptions to receiving a “W” related to Clinical Attendance.

b. Withdrawal Passing “WP”: Withdrawal deadline, meeting all appropriate course outcomes and maintaining a 2.0 “C” course grade. Withdrawal Deadline: To receive a “WP”, a student must complete and submit withdrawal form(s) no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday of the thirteenth (13th) week of a sixteen (16) week semester or the seventh (7th) week of an eight (8) week semester.

c. Withdrawal Failing “WF”: Withdrawal after mid-term and before the withdrawal deadline and not meeting all appropriate course outcomes and/or failing to maintain a 2.0 “C” course grade. See appropriate Program Handbook for specific program consequences of a “WF”. Withdrawal Deadline: To receive a “WF”, a student must complete and submit withdrawal form(s) no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday of the thirteenth (13th) week of a sixteen (16) week semester or the seventh (7th) week of an eight (8) week semester.

SPECIAL NOTES: When a student withdraws from a course, an official withdrawal form must be completed and signed by the student, academic advisor, the Financial Aid Department, and the course faculty member and submitted to the Registrar. Non-attendance does not constitute an official withdrawal.

a. A grade of “W”, “WP”, or “WF” will not be calculated in the GPA.

b. A student is considered to be enrolled until officially withdrawn. Failure to officially withdraw from a course will result in a grade of “F” for that course.

Unofficial Withdrawal

  1. An Unofficial Withdrawal Student is one who has commenced attendance for a course but discontinues attendance without officially withdrawing from the course.

  2. For purposes of GPA computation a grade of “F” is assigned.

a. An “F” may indicate that the student is not making satisfactory academic progress; consequences may include academic probation, termination, and financial aid implications.

b. All tuition and related charges for the course remain due and payable with no downgrade adjustment.

c. Dates used for the return of Title IV funds calculation will be:

  1. The last date of attendance as reported by course faculty.
  2. The midpoint of the term if the last date of attendance cannot be determined.

d. Any refund due federal financial aid accounts is the student’s responsibility and appears on the next College bill.

College Withdrawal

  1. An enrolled student can voluntarily withdraw from the College for academic or personal reasons. If enrolled in a course(s), a withdrawal grade in accordance with the Course Withdrawal Policy will be assigned.
  2. When a student withdraws from the College, an official withdrawal form must be completed and signed by the student and submitted to the Registrar. A financial aid exit interview must also be completed with the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid. Non-attendance does not constitute an official withdrawal.

a. A grade of “W”, “WP”, or “WF” will not be calculated in the GPA.

b. A student is considered to be enrolled until officially withdrawn from the College. Failure to officially withdraw from the College will result in grades of “F” for all registered courses.

c. Readmission following withdrawal is not automatic.

Audit Policy

Audit students are those who desire to attend course(s) without receiving academic credit.

Criteria:

a. Students may audit any theory-based or didactic course at the College. For safety and patient privacy reasons, the clinical component of all nursing courses may not be audited.

b. No academic credit will be given for an audited class.

c. Tuition and fees for classes audited will be the same as those taken for credit.

d. Courses audited will not be counted in computing the maximum number of hours for which a student is allowed to register.

e. Students are expected to follow the same attendance regulations for audited classes as for credit classes.

f. Students may take the examinations but are not required to do so.

g. Audited classes are recorded with an “AU”.

h. All students must make the decision to audit at the time of registration. Students should refer to the add/drop policy for any change in course designation.

i. The Registrar will not honor a change request for credit and/or audit after the deadline date for refund of fees has passed.

Graduation Requirements

Updated 10/19/16

To graduate from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, a student must have satisfied all completion requirements. These include having:

  1. Satisfactorily completed all specific program requirements.

  2. Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 “C”.

  3. Satisfied any applicable academic residency requirements.

  4. Been certified as eligible for graduation by the Registrar.

  5. Discharged all financial obligations to the College. This includes the return of clinical and parking access cards (e.g., RFID) or the fee for such cards.

Graduating students are expected to attend graduation ceremonies. The Chief Academic Officer must give permission for any exceptions.

Academic Honors

The College recognizes those graduating students who have demonstrated significant academic achievement. Academic honors are designated in the commencement program based upon the overall GPA at the end of the semester prior to the ceremony due to printing time of graduation documents. Academic honors for prospective RN-BSN graduates are based upon the 42 credits required to complete the program rather than overall GPA.

Students will be recognized with one of the following honorary designations:

  • Summa Cum Laude 3.90 – 4.00 GPA
  • Magna Cum Laude 3.70 – 3.89 GPA
  • Cum Laude 3.50 – 3.69 GPA

Students’ Rights under FERPA

Students’ Rights under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older OR who attends a post-secondary institution.) Attendance commences when the student first establishes any contact with the College resulting in the establishment of an educational record containing personally identifiable information. Education records are subject to FERPA even after the individual has left the institution, however any records created or received after a student is no longer in attendance are not subject to FERPA (e.g. alumni records). These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences receives a request for access.

A student should submit to the Registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. A College official will be present during a student’s review of his/her education record. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

  1. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes to be inaccurate, containing misleading information or are in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA.

A student who wishes to ask the College to amend a record should write to the College official responsible for the record, clearly identifying the part of the record he/she wants changed, specify why it should be changed, and include the actual change in language that the student is proposing. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested, the College will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided when the student is notified of the right to a hearing. The student may include explanatory comments regarding the record that they believe should have been amended but the College has decided not to modify.

  1. The right to provide written consent before the College discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

The College discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences who performs an institutional service or function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the school with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent, or a student volunteering to assist another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Upon request from officials of another school, the College also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5920

Directory Information Disclosure

Updated 4/6/17

Directory information regarding the student may be provided to the public upon request unless a student files a request with the Registration and Records Office asking to be excluded from the directory or from any other requests for open information from outside entities. The request should be submitted prior to the 12th day of class of the starting semester. A request to withhold information may be submitted after the stated deadline for a semester, but information may be released between the deadline and the receipt of the request. The file of the student who has asked to be excluded will be flagged until the student requests the flag be removed. The College, in its discretion, may choose not to disclose directory information. Further, the College may choose to release Directory Information but limit the scope of the release to specific parties, for specific purposes, or both.

Directory information consists of:

  • Student’s full name
  • Address
  • Telephone listing
  • Photograph
  • Major field of study
  • Grade level (freshman, sophomore)
  • Enrollment status (i.e. full-time, half-time, etc.)
  • Dates of attendance (term dates but not last date of attendance if withdrawn, or daily attendance record)
  • Degree, honors, and awards received
  • Participation in officially recognized activities

The Solomon Amendment, a federal law, mandates that colleges must fulfill military recruitment requests for lists containing ‘student recruiting information’. The ‘student recruiting information’ that may be requested includes: name, address, telephone, date of birth, class level, academic major, place of birth, degrees received, and most recent educational institution attended. Students are not permitted to restrict the release of their ‘student recruiting information’ specifically to the military, but if students withhold the release of their ‘directory information’ under FERPA, then the college is prohibited from releasing it to the military either.

FERPA permits the disclosure of PII from students’ education records, without consent of the student, if the disclosure meets certain conditions found in §99.31 of the FERPA regulations. Except for disclosures to school officials, disclosures related to some judicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas, disclosures of directory information, and disclosures to the student, §99.32 of FERPA regulations requires the institution to record the disclosure. Requests for access to education records will be recorded. Eligible students have a right to inspect and review the record of disclosures. A post-secondary institution may disclose PII from the education records without obtaining prior written consent of the student –

  • To other school officials, including teachers, within the College whom the school has determined to have legitimate educational interests. This includes contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions, provided that the conditions listed in §99.31(a)(1)(i)(B)(1) - (a)(1)(i)(B)(2) are met. (§99.31(a)(1)). School officials have a legitimate educational interest when, in the exercise or completion of their responsibilities on behalf of the institution, they incur the need to know and utilize specific information from education records.
  • To officials of another school, upon their request, where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer, subject to the requirements of §99.34. (§99.31(a)(2))
  • To authorized representatives of the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local educational authorities, such as a state post-secondary authority that is responsible for supervising the university’s state-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of federal- or state-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§99.31(a)(3) and 99.35)
  • In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. (§99.31(a)(4))
  • To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or © improve instruction. (§99.31(a)(6))
  • To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. ((§99.31(a)(7))
  • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (§99.31(a)(9))
  • To a court if a parent or student has initiated legal action against an educational agency or institution, or if an educational agency or institution has initiated a legal action against a parent or student (§ 99.31 (a)(9)(iii)(A) and (B)).
  • To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency, subject to §99.36. (§99.31(a)(10))
  • Information the school has designated as “directory information” under §99.37. (§99.31(a)(11))
  • To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of §99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. (§99.31(a)(13))
  • To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of §99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. (§99.31(a)(14))
  • To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any federal, state, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. (§99.31(a)(15))
  • To comply with required disclosures regarding sex offenders and other individuals who must register under section 170101 of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, 42 USC 14071. (§ 99.31 (a)(16)).

Copies of the Act and Federal Regulations are available by going to the Department of Education website FERPA Compliance page.

Support ServicesLast updated: February 11, 2019

The Christ College of Nuring offers exceptional student support.

Department of Student Success

To better prepare students for academic and non-academic success, in addition to life-long learning, the Student Success Department provides social and educational programs grounded in core values, academic accommodations for qualified students, and academic advising.

Counseling Services

Multiple resources are available to students in need of personal support. Students are strongly encouraged to reach out to a College Administrator, the Director of Financial Aid, Registrar, or their advisor. Each of these individuals will be able to listen to the student’s concerns and direct them to the appropriate area for support.

Students in need of personal counseling services for non-academic matters will be directed to contact IMPACT Student Life Assistance (1-866-780-0855). IMPACT is a 247 resource designed to help students manage emotional and academic stress and the demands associated with balancing school, work, daily living, family and relationship concerns. All IMPACT counselors are qualified masters/doctoral level professionals who can help students with issues such as:

  • child-bearing concerns
  • child and elder-care assistance
  • marital difficulty
  • work stress
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • grief
  • financial troubles
  • alcohol and drug-related problems
  • legal assistance

IMPACT’s services are confidential and complimentary. If you feel that you (or one of your family members) may benefit from these services, please contact your advisor.

Students may also contact the Department of Pastoral Services of The Christ Hospital. The chaplains in the department are ministers who are qualified through their training and experience to offer spiritual care to all people in The Christ Hospital. Their sensitivity to individual beliefs and knowledge of different religious practices enable these chaplains to meet people at the point of their need. Offices of the Department of Pastoral Services are located on the first floor of the Hospital, near the lobby, and are open weekdays from 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM. A chaplain is on call 24 hours a day, and a Hospital associate can aid you in reaching a chaplain at any time by calling (513) 585-2000.

Academic Advising

The purpose of academic advising is to enhance the success of our students academically, professionally, and inter-personally. To successfully accomplish this, it is important that the roles and responsibilities of the advisor, the student, and the institution be clearly defined and regularly evaluated, thereby assuring compliance by all participants.

Advisor Roles and Responsibilities

Role: Coach

Responsibilities:

  • Help student set realistic academic and professional goals
  • Motivate the student to achieve those goals
  • Help student regularly evaluate his/her progress toward their goals
  • Work with students as difficulties arise

Role: Mentor

Responsibilities:

  • Work with students to address issues in the area of academics, professional life, and personal skills
  • Model effective skills for the student
  • Listen in a non-judgmental way to student concerns

Role: Facilitator

Responsibilities:

  • Assist the student with the registration process
  • Facilitate discussion with student’s professors when problems arise
  • Direct students to support services or other resources as they are needed

Advisee Roles and Responsibilities

Role: Adult Learner

Responsibilities:

  • Work towards setting realistic goals, establishing priorities, decision-making, and putting the college experience into perspective
  • Demonstrate responsibility for own actions
  • Treat advisor with respect
  • Monitor and discuss progress towards academic goals with advisor

Role: Mentee

Responsibilities:

  • Make self accessible to meet with advisor and actively participate in the advising process
  • Be willing to discuss personal and academic obstacles to success
  • Accept shared responsibility for academic success

Institution Roles and Responsibilities

Role: Manager

Responsibilities:

Provide the resources required for the advising program to successfully accomplish its mission.

Specifically, the institution will provide resources in the areas of leadership, organization, facilities, professional development and training of advisors. It will also provide the necessary protocols and procedures to support the advising process.

Role: Evaluator

Responsibilities:

  • Evaluation of the advising program
  • Monitor student progress through the curriculum and collecting data regarding time to graduation, graduation rates, retention rates, etc.

Role: Communicator

Responsibilities:

Regularly and consistently communicate to faculty and students information regarding any changes to the curriculum, course prerequisites, course sequence, etc.

Adapted from: Faculty Advising Examined: Enhancing the Potential of College Faculty as Advisors, G.L. Kramer (Ed.) (2003). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

Academic Accommodations

Equal Access and Accommodations Policy

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (the “College”) is committed to students’ equal access to programs, services and activities in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) of 2008. It is the College’s policy to provide individuals with disabilities full and equal enjoyment of the services, facilities, and privileges of the College. The College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its admission, recruitment, academics, housing, research, financial aid, counseling, employment assistance, and/or any other service, facility, or privilege available to students or potential students. Further, the College does not screen out, exclude, expel, limit, or otherwise discriminate against an individual seeking admission as a student, or an individual enrolled as a student, based on disability. The College promotes an environment of respect and support for individuals with disabilities.

  1. Students or potential students with disabilities as defined by applicable law have the right to request reasonable accommodations from the College. Where applicable, the College will make reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities.

a. Reasonable accommodations may include reasonable modifications to the College’s policies, practices, and procedures where necessary for individuals with disabilities, unless doing so would alter requirements that are essential to the instruction being pursued or to licensing requirements.

b. The College will also provide necessary and reasonable auxiliary aids and services for individuals with disabilities. The College strives to remove barriers for individuals with disabilities and to provide services, facilities, and privileges to achieve equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities. Examples of some areas in which reasonable accommodations may be available include, but are not limited to: classroom and/or testing situations, access to facilities, communication access, registration, and parking.

c. It is important to note, however, that the professions for which the College offers programs may have cognitive, sensory, affective, and psychomotor functional requirements that are essential for the delivery of safe, effective care. Thus, individuals must be able to meet those technical requirements, with or without reasonable accommodation, in order to participate in the College’s programs.

Individuals should consult with Fay Coleman in the Student Success Department, located in room 132 of the College or at (513) 585-2959 for information on the technical standards essential to the practice of professions for which the College offers programs.

  1. Students bear the responsibility for disclosure of a disability and the request for reasonable accommodations.
  2. The College’s Student Success Department Accommodations Office (“SS”) personnel, in consultation with the individual, faculty, staff, and other departments as necessary, focus on assessing each individual’s situation to identify needs and appropriate, reasonable accommodations. Both supportive documentation and a confidential interview with the student help to provide needed information.
  3. The SS asks individuals who request accommodations to provide, in writing and through an interview, a description of the condition for which they are seeking accommodation, past accommodations sought and/or provided, and the individual’s explanation of the condition’s likely impact on educational experiences at the College, in addition to any other information. Information helpful in supporting accommodation requests and assisting the SS in evaluating requests and making determinations may include, but are not limited to, medical records, psycho-educational testing, and school records.

If you do not have copies of this type of information, you are welcome to meet with SS accommodations personnel to discuss obtaining such information and/or other materials that may assist in establishing the existence of a disability requiring accommodation, demonstrating the impact of a disability on the educational experience, and/or evaluating available reasonable accommodations. Documentation and an interview are important tools for determining qualification for accommodation, reasonable accommodations, and developing a plan for providing such accommodations.

  1. Any individual with a disability seeking accommodation should submit the following to SS personnel:

a. Completed application for Academic Accommodations and Services, which is obtainable through SS. The application can also be found in Blackboard under the Student Success tab.

b. As discussed above, supportive documentation, as available, regarding the condition(s) and the need for accommodations. This includes, but is not limited to, your description of your needs in the application; records of past accommodations and services from another educational institution or environment; formal psychological or medical evaluations, and letters from health, education or service providers.

c. When submitting materials, consider the following:

  1. How does your condition(s) affect or how may it affect your educational experience or participation at the College?
  2. What tools or strategies facilitate your access? What has been successful or unsuccessful in the past?
  3. What barriers can you anticipate to your educational experience or participation at the College based on your condition(s)?

d. Documentation must be submitted within a reasonable time frame. Determination of eligibility for accommodations, development of plans for providing reasonable accommodations, and implementing reasonable accommodations for many conditions may require ample notice. Contact: Fay Coleman (513) 585-2959 for more information.

  1. Following the process outlined above, when a reasonable accommodation is deemed necessary, the SS will develop a plan identifying the student’s condition(s) requiring accommodation, the circumstances for which accommodations are needed, and the reasonable accommodations recommended by the SS. The reasonable accommodations recommended by the SS are determined through the collaboration of the SS, the student, faculty, individual departments and Deans, and outside professionals as warranted, with consideration for essential standards for courses, programs, services and activities, or status of facilities.
  2. The plan developed by the SS will be distributed to those with a need to know to put any accommodation in place. Additionally, the SS will contact individual faculty members to discuss, as necessary, the recommended accommodations and the process for implementation. Faculty members are expected to assist with provision of accommodations when reasonable and necessary without compromise to essential elements of the course or evaluation standards. If agreed upon accommodations are not implemented in an effective or timely manner then the student is encouraged to contact the SS.
  3. If an accommodation is provided, then the accommodation applies on a prospective basis. For example, an accommodation provided does not apply to course work completed before the request for and implementation of the accommodation provided.
  4. SS arranges for the accommodation(s). It is the student’s responsibility to establish and maintain communication with the instructor and for the student to keep up with his/her responsibilities.
  5. Each student is encouraged to maintain close contact with the SS and the student’s instructors and to provide feedback as to the effectiveness of accommodations provided.
  6. Medical information provided by the student pursuant to this policy will be kept confidential to the extent possible, except that information may be shared as necessary to implement accommodations.
  7. Students who have concerns about accommodations provided or not provided or who wish to submit a complaint about discrimination or harassment based on disability, should contact Fay Coleman, Director of Student Success, at (513)-585-2959 or Fay.Coleman@TheChristCollege.edu, the Associate Dean, Compliance, the Associate Dean of their Department, the Dean of College Support Services, the Chief Academic Officer, and/or the College President. The College endeavors to provide prompt and equitable resolution to student concerns.

Clarification of Terms and Conditions

  1. Reasonable Accommodations: Reasonable accommodations include modifications to policy, procedure, or practice and the provision of services that are designed to provide equal access to programs and services for qualified individuals with special needs. Accommodations are reasonable when they do not pose a direct threat to health, safety, or quality of care; when they do not fundamentally alter the nature of a program or service; and when they do not represent an undue financial or administrative burden.
  2. Definition of Disability: The United States’ Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines “disability” as “having a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities.” In addition, the ADA protects individuals from discrimination if they have a record of such impairments or if they are regarded as having such impairments. Additional protections are provided through Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
  3. Special Need: A special need is a unique situation that substantially impairs or limits potential scholastic success.

Essential Elements of Disability/Special Needs Documentation

  1. Qualified Professional Documentation should be provided by a licensed or otherwise properly credentialed professional who has undergone appropriate and comprehensive training, has relevant experience, and has no personal relationship with the individual being evaluated. A good match between the credentials of the individual making the diagnosis and the condition being reported is expected (e.g., an orthopedic limitation might be documented by a physician, but not a licensed psychologist).
  2. Current Functional Limitations Information on how the disabling condition(s) currently impacts the individual provides useful information for both establishing a disability and identifying possible accommodations. Documentation should be thorough enough to demonstrate whether and how a major life activity is substantially limited by providing a clear sense of the severity, frequency, and pervasiveness of the conditions(s). A combination of the results of formal evaluation procedures, clinical narrative, and the individual’s self-report will be reviewed. While recent documentation is recommended in most circumstances, discretion will be used in accepting older documentation of conditions that are permanent or non-varying. Likewise, changing conditions and/or changes in how the condition impacts the individual may warrant more frequent updates in order to provide an accurate picture. The need for recent documentation depends on the facts and circumstances of the individual’s condition.
  3. Accommodations. A description of recommended current and past accommodations, services and/or medication documentation should include a description of both current and past medications relevant to the student’s perceived disability, auxiliary aids, assistive devices, support services, and accommodations, including their effectiveness (and side-effects) in reducing functional impacts of the perceived disability. Recommended accommodations and strategies should be logically related to functional limitations. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has no obligation to provide or adopt recommendations made by outside entities. High school special education evaluations, Summary of Performance (SOP) or Individual Educational Program (IEP) may provide adequate information to document a disability. In addition, references to academic weaknesses/learning differences/test anxiety alone may not substantiate a learning disability diagnosis.

Review of Documentation and the Determination of Accommodation

  1. All documentation will be reviewed on an individual, case-by-case basis. This calls for an individualized inquiry, examining the impact of a student’s perceived disability on the individual and within the specific context of the request for accommodations.
  2. Determination of accommodations is an interactive process. When the student applies for accommodations, permission is granted to the Department of Student Success to contact the evaluator for clarification of any information (test results, conclusions, recommendations, etc.) contained in the documentation unless stated otherwise in writing at the time of the application. An interview with the student will be conducted in order to inquire about the perceived disability, understand its impact and identify appropriate accommodations. The institution and the individual with a perceived disability will determine appropriate accommodations.
  3. Documentation of a specific disability does not translate directly into specific accommodations. Reasonable accommodations are individually determined and based on the functional impact of the condition and its likely interaction with the environment. As such, accommodations may vary from individual to individual with the “same” disability diagnosis and from environment to environment for the same individual.
  4. The granting of an accommodation does not mean the applicant is regarded as disabled. Use of the term “disability” in or the granting of an accommodation under this policy does not mean that The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has concluded that any student or applicant is disabled within the meaning of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or any other statute.
  5. The Department of Student Success assists students with special needs in arranging accommodations for tests that are part of required course work.

Students who have completed the necessary steps for special accommodations with the Department of Student Success and have been approved for testing accommodations should follow these steps:

  1. Review the letter sent via email from the Department of Student Success outlining your accommodations. This letter will also be sent to the lead course professor for courses specified by the student.
  2. Complete the Request for Letters document and return to Fay Coleman at Fay.Coleman@TheChristCollege.edu. You must complete a “Request for Letters” document each semester you wish to receive accommodations.
  3. Ask the instructor to complete the “_instructor_” section of the Test Request Form if the Department of Student Success will be involved in the testing arrangements.

a. The instructor may prefer to administer his or her own tests.

b. The instructor should complete the “alternate time” section for students who need to take the exam at a different time than the rest of the class, or for exams that will end after 3:30 PM.

c. Return the completed Test Request form to the Department of Student Success at least three (3) working days prior to the first test date.

Disability Related Grievance Procedure

Updated 12/13/17

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has designated the Associate Dean, Compliance, Medical Office Building, Office 306, (513) 585-2055 as the individual responsible for the coordination of efforts to comply with its responsibilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADA).

A full statement of the College’s Equal Access and Accommodations Policy, the definition of relevant terms and an explanation of the process for requesting accommodations is located in the College Catalog. Students with concerns or complaints arising out of the College’s responsibilities under Section 504 or the ADA may raise them in accordance with the following grievance procedures:

Informal Resolution

Any student who feels that he/she has been discriminated against on the basis of a disability, or who feels that a requested reasonable accommodation has not been provided or implemented in an effective or timely manner, or who feels that he/she has been subjected to an act of discrimination or harassment on the basis of disability* is encouraged to first attempt to resolve the matter informally with any individuals involved. Students are free, as part of this informal process, to consult with the Associate Dean, Compliance/Disability Coordinator for concerns or complaints related to academic accommodations, assistive technology issues, instructional issues, parking issues, and other physical barrier issues.

Formal Resolution

  1. If the student chooses not to attempt an informal resolution, or if an informal resolution is attempted but not achieved, the student may file a formal grievance with the Associate Dean, Compliance. If the complaint is against the Associate Dean, Compliance/Disability Coordinator, the student may file the formal grievance with the Dean of Operations. The contact information for these offices is as follows: Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean, Compliance/Disability Coordinator, Medical Office Building—Office 306, 513-585-2055 and Carolyn Hunter, Dean of Operations, Main College Building Office 124, 513-585-2068.
  2. The grievance must be filed within thirty (30) calendar days of the occurrence of the event(s) giving rise to the complaint.
  3. The grievance must be in writing and signed by the student.
  4. The grievance must contain the following:
  • The name, address, and phone number of the student.
  • The name and position of the person against whom the complaint is made.
  • A clear statement of the complaint and suggestions for resolution.
  • The names of any witness(es) or individual(s) who the student believes has knowledge or information supporting the allegations contained in the grievance.
  • Supporting documentation (including, as appropriate, relevant medical records).
  1. An ad hoc grievance resolution committee will be convened by the Director, Constituent Relations within ten (10) calendar days of the date on which the College receives the formal grievance. The make-up of the committee will vary depending on the nature of the complaint or issue and will include individuals with expertise specific to the disability and/or issue who have been appropriately trained in Section 504 standards and investigative methods. Unless the complaint is against the Disability Coordinator, the Disability Coordinator will be an ad hoc member of the committee. The committee will interview the student, the individual(s) against whom the complaint is made, any individuals identified by the student as having knowledge or information supporting the grievance, and any other involved parties. The committee will also collect and review any documentation or other evidence identified by the student, and other information related to the complaint as appropriate. Medical information provided by the complainant in support of his or her grievance will be kept confidential to the extent possible, except that information may be shared as necessary to implement any resolution of the grievance.
  2. In most instances, the grievance committee will make a good faith decision regarding the merits of the grievance within fourteen (14) calendar days of the date on which it convened. In cases where the grievance committee is unable to make a decision within this timeframe, it will notify the complainant of the need for additional time, the reason, and an approximate date upon which a decision will be made.

a. If the grievance committee, in its good faith discretion, determines that there is reason to believe a grievance has merit, it will notify all parties in writing of that determination, as well as suggest a proposed resolution. The grievance committee will then convene a meeting with the student to discuss the proposed resolution of the grievance and to hear alternative proposals for a resolution offered by the student. The ultimate resolution of any grievance, or determination of whether a new, modified, or additional accommodation will be provided to the student, rests in the sole discretion of the grievance committee and the College.

b. If the grievance committee, in its good faith discretion, determines that there is not sufficient evidence to support the claims made in the formal grievance, it will notify all parties of that determination in writing.

  1. A student who disagrees with the resolution of a grievance, or with the determination by the grievance committee that the evidence provided does not support the claims made in the formal grievance, may appeal to the Dean of Operations. Such an appeal must be made in writing within seven (7) calendar days of the grievance committee’s decision.
  2. In substantiated cases of disability-related discrimination or harassment, the College will take appropriate steps to prevent recurrence and to correct discriminatory effects on the complainant and others, if appropriate.
  3. The College will maintain all documents and other materials related to the grievance proceedings for a period of two (2) years.

Right to Pursue External Complaints

Nothing in this process should be construed as impeding or prohibiting a student from filing a discrimination complaint with the appropriate external governmental agency. Although a student with a complaint is encouraged to attempt to resolve his/her grievance within this procedure, he/she has the right to file a grievance directly with the Office of Civil Rights or the Ohio Civil Rights Commission, before or after the internal process has begun. The internal process will continue through completion, regardless of whether a grievant files a complaint with the appropriate external governmental agency.

Complaint Referral

If, at any point during the informal or formal grievance procedure, it becomes known or apparent that the grievance or concern arises from acts of discrimination or harassment not related to the College’s obligations under Section 504 or the ADA, the grievance or concern will be promptly referred to the Dean of Operations or President of the College as appropriate, pursuant to the College’s Policy Against Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment and Misconduct, and Retaliation. In such cases, the College will conduct only a single investigation pursuant to the applicable policy and procedures.

Prohibition Against Retaliation

Updated 7/27/16; 12/13/17

Any student who has sought an informal or formal resolution of a complaint or grievance under this Policy, or who has participated in any investigation into such a complaint or grievance, and who subsequently believes he or she has been subjected to retaliation of any kind by any College employee, administrator, or officer, is directed to immediately report the alleged retaliatory conduct to the Associate Dean, Compliance/Disability Coordinator. If the complaint of retaliation is against the Associate Dean, Student Success/Disability Coordinator, the student may submit the complaint to the Dean of Operations.

Reports of retaliation will be investigated promptly in a manner intended to protect confidentiality as much as practical, consistent with the College’s obligation to conduct a full and fair investigation. The party conducting the investigation will notify the student of the results of the investigation.

Non-Discrimination Statement: The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is committed to a policy of non-discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, citizenship, religion, ethnicity, age, gender, gender identity, genetics, marital status, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, military or veteran status, disability, or any other status protected by local, state or federal law (collectively, “protected statuses”) in the administration of its educational, recruitment, and admissions policies; scholarship and loan programs; and athletic or other College-administered programs. All institutional processes and policies are in compliance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations related to discrimination.

The following people have been designated to handle specific inquiries regarding specific non-discrimination policies:

For inquiries related to disabilities, please contact

Fay Silverman, Director of Student Success. Office: 132. Telephone No.: (513) 585-2959. mailtio:Fay.Silverman@TheChristCollege.edu

For inquiries related to Title IX/Sexual Assault and all other discrimination-related inquiries, please contact

Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean of Compliance/Title IX Coordinator. Medical Office Building, Office 306. Telephone No.: (513) 585-2055. mailtio:Maureen.Schwab@TheChristCollege.edu

Inquiries regarding Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 can also be made to the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR). OCR can be contacted by visiting http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html or by calling 1-800-421-3481.

This policy applies equally to all persons visiting or attending events at the College. Any visitor who feels that he/she has been discriminated against on the basis of a disability or who feels that he/she has been subjected to an act of discrimination or harassment on the basis of disability is encouraged to first attempt to resolve the matter informally with any individuals involved. However, he/she is free to pursue a formal resolution as outlined in steps 1 through 9 above.

Student Accounts Office

The Student Accounts Office at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is responsible for student billing, revenue collection, refunds, and posting payments on student accounts. This office also oversees payment plans, financial aid refunds, the collection of past due tuition, and prepares billing statements to agencies that have authorized payment for student accounts. In addition, student loan, grant, and scholarship disbursement to student balances is the responsibility of this office.

Tuition and Fees

Updated 10/1/17; 4/16/18

Tuition and fees are established by The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences Board of Directors.

Current tuition and fees for each of the College’s programs can be accessed at https://www.thechristcollege.edu/cost-tuition/

Fees are assessed during the course of study dependent upon the student’s choice of program. The general categories of fees are:

  • Health Fee
  • Learning Resource/Registration and Technology Fee
  • Student Activity Fee
  • Graduation Fee
  • NCLEX Review Course Fee
  • Malpractice Insurance Fee
  • Parking Fee
  • Science Lab Fee
  • Nursing Course Fee
  • Nursing Skills Lab Fee
  • Lost Student ID Badge Fee

All fees are non-refundable.

Payment of Tuition and Fees

Updated 1/11/16; 4/16/18

A Billing Statement (tuition and fees bill) is prepared and mailed to students prior to each semester. Students can view their Billing Statement by logging into SONIS, which will display the charges and credits, including tuition, fees, aid and loans, for a specific semester as a PDF document. Students can access their Billing Statement in SONIS by following the steps below:

  1. Log into SONIS with your Student ID number and your Pin Number

a. If you forgot your Pin a ‘I forgot my Pin’ link is located under the Login button.

b. If this is your first-time logging into SONIS your password is your birthdate (MMDDYY)!

  1. Click the “Financial” link on the left hand of the screen, and select “Billing”
  2. Underneath the School Year and Semester is a link called “Click here to view statement”

It is the student’s responsibility to routinely check their Billing Statement in SONIS to ensure their financial obligations are met by the specified due dates. Tuition and fees, along with other charges must be paid in full or the student must be enrolled in the Tuition Payment Plan by the published tuition and fees due date on the Academic Calendar in order to maintain continuous enrollment.

Ways to pay tuition and fees:

Mail – Check and money order payments may be made by mailing them to the TCCNHS address listed below; DO NOT MAIL CASH! Make checks and money orders payable to The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences. Include the student’s name and student ID number on the check or money order.

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences Attention Student Accounts

2139 Auburn Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45219

Debit/Credit CardPayments can be made online by clicking here: https://thechristcollege.secure.force.com/form?formid=217727

There is no additional processing fee for making debit/credit card payments online.

You will need to know your balance and/or amount you want to be charged to your credit/debit card!

In Person– Cash, check, money order, and debit/credit card payments may be made in the Student Accounts Office, Room 130, Monday-Friday 8:00 am – 3:30 pm. You can also call the Student Accounts Office at 513-585-2404 between the hours of 8:30 am – 3:30 pm (Eastern Time Zone) to make a debit/credit card payment over the phone.

Tuition Payment Plan

Updated 4/16/18

The Tuition Payment Plan is an excellent option for those who do not want to pay their bill all at one time prior to the start of the semester. A Tuition Payment Plan Enrollment Form, obtained from the printable forms on the Registrar/Bursar Blackboard home page or outside the Student Accounts Office (room 130), must be completed and submitted to the Student Accounts Office by the tuition due date for that semester.

The plan consists of four (4) payments per semester for Fall and Spring Semesters and three (3) payments for the Summer Session. The Tuition Payment Plan has a nonrefundable enrollment fee of $40.00 for the Fall Semester, $40.00 for the Spring Semester and $20.00 for the Summer Session. The enrollment fee is due with the first payment each semester.

PLEASE NOTE: Payment Plans are semester specific and a new enrollment form must be submitted for each semester the student wishes to participate in The Tuition Payment Plan. We do not offer an annual payment plan.

A student should keep a copy of the Tuition Payment Plan Enrollment Form for their records. The Student Accounts Office may send out notices of due dates however it is the student’s responsibility to know the due dates of the Tuition Payment Enrollment Form. Please refer any payment questions, unusual financial circumstances or issues regarding payments to the Student Accounts Office immediately, so that the College can assist the student in planning or determining possible alternatives regarding payments.

Financial Obligations

Updated 1/11/16; 4/16/18

Students are responsible for payment of all costs associated with attending The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by the published due date on the Academic Calendar. Application for financial assistance does not negate this responsibility. A student’s financial obligation for each semester must be met in order to remain enrolled at the College, and to register for a course in a subsequent session or semester. Unusual circumstances or a financial crisis should be reported to the Student Account’s Office immediately, so that the College can assist the student in planning or determining possible alternatives. Students who fail to meet their financial obligations cannot register for courses, and will accumulate late fees (see Late Fee Policy). If the financial obligation is not met within the designated time period the student will be referred to the Dean, College Support Services, which may result in Blackboard access being disabled, withdrawal from that semester’s course(s) and/or dismissal from the College until all financial obligations have been met. In addition, students are required to meet all financial obligations before grades, transcripts or degrees will be issued.

See Late Payment Policy regarding late fees and Adding a class after the Payment deadline regarding adding a course(s) after being dropped for non-payment.

Former students are required to meet all financial obligations before grades, transcripts or degrees will be issued. Any former student that owes a debt to the College cannot re-apply to the College.

Late Payment Policy

Updated 1/11/16; 4/16/18

It is the responsibility of each student to frequently access his or her account in SONIS and be aware of published payment due dates on the Academic Calendar and/or Tuition Payment Plan Enrollment Form. All student accounts are to be paid –in-full or a student must enroll in the Tuition Payment Plan by the published Tuition and Fees due date for that semester. Payment due dates for students choosing to pay the full balance due prior to the beginning of each semester are published in the Academic Calendar. Students choosing to enroll in the ‘Tuition Payment Plan’ should refer to the ‘Tuition Payment Plan Enrollment Form’ for the payment due dates for the semester.

If payment is not received by the due date, the student will be subject to a $25 per day late fee. The $25 per day late fee will accrue during the designated period of five (5) business days or until all financial obligations (including late fees) have been met. If the financial obligations (late fees included) are not met after five (5) business days from the agreed due date the student’s account will be referred to the Dean, College Support Services, and may result in Blackboard access being disabled, withdrawal from course(s) and/or dismissal from the college.

See adding a class after the Payment deadline regarding adding a course9s) after being dropped for non-payment.

Adding a Class after the Payment Deadline

Added 1/11/16; 4/16/18

Students may add a class after the published tuition payment due date. Payment for the additional class will be due within five (5) business days of adding the course or by the published ‘Last Day for 100% Refund’ for the session the course is in. Registration is not complete until payment is made with the Student Accounts Office. If the student is already enrolled in the Tuition Payment Plan, remaining payments can be adjusted to reflect the additional charges by contacting the Student Accounts Office.

A student can add course(s) after they were dropped from course(s) because payment was not received by the Tuition and Fees due date or during the Late Payment designated period. The student would contact the Registrar’s Office to enroll in the course(s), and contact the Student Accounts Office to make a full payment (plus late fees), or set up a Tuition Payment Plan (including the late fees). Registration is not complete until payment is made with the Student Accounts Office. The Student Accounts Office and Registrar’s Office cannot promise the student will have the same class schedule as they had prior to being dropped for non-payment.

Returned Check Policy

A $15.00 fee will be charged for any check returned. More than two (2) returned checks will result in immediate suspension of your right to pay by check.

Course Withdrawal Refund Policy

Updated 4/16/18

If dropping/withdrawing from a single course or from the College, a student should notify their Academic Advisor about their intention. The student should contact the Financial Aid Office (if they are using Aid) and the Student Accounts Office about how dropping course(s) will impact their financial obligations. If the student wishes to proceed with the withdrawal the Academic Advisor will notify the Registrar to drop the course. The withdrawal is complete when the Registrar has received notification from the Academic Advisor, and has processed the grade and an effective last date of attendance. Students who withdraw from course(s) or the College are responsible for any outstanding financial obligations at the time of withdrawal. If a balance is due then the students can pay in full or make payment arraignments with the Student Accounts Office. See Financial Obligation policy regarding the release of grades and transcripts when owing a debt to the College.

A withdrawal refund is not made unless the student has followed the withdrawal policy. Students may be eligible for a withdrawal refund once the course(s) have been officially dropped/withdrawn. Fees are non-refundable. Refer to the Refund Schedule below for the percentage of tuition refund a student is eligible to receive based on both the length of the course and the official drop/withdraw date filed in the Registration and Records Office.

Notification to an individual instructor or failure to attend class does not constitute an official withdrawal. An effective date of withdrawal and clarification of withdrawal from a course(s) or program at the College is required. An exit interview with the Financial Aid Office is required for students receiving financial aid who completely withdrawal from the College.

Course Withdrawal Refund Schedule

Sixteen (16) Week Semester

Class Days

Refund Percentage

1-6

100%

7-12

75%

13-18

50%

19-24

25%

25+

0%

Eight (8) Week Semester

Class Days

Refund Percentage

1-6

100%

7-12

50%

13+

0%

Refund Dates

Please refer to the Academic Calendars to determine the date of eligibility for a specific tuition refund percentage.

Educational Technology Department

The Educational Technology Department (Ed Tech) supports a collaborative learning environment and student success by steering and managing the selection, implementation and assessment of educational technologies utilized by College and Network constituents.

Blackboard Learning Management System

The College utilizes Blackboard Learn as its web-based Learning Management System (LMS). While the College offers some fully online courses, all courses use the LMS in some capacity (for online assessments, discussion forums, submission of assignments etc.). Each instructor maintains the freedom to use Blackboard as they deem appropriate. Blackboard can be accessed at thechristcollege.Blackboard.com or by way of a link on the College’s website: www.thechristcollege.edu.

SONIS Student Information System

Sonis is a student and faculty reference for registration, courses, schedules, grades, degree audit, billing, and personal information. Sonis can be accessend by going to https://ccnhssonis.com/, Onestop at the college website or My Christ College Portal on the Blackboard login page at https://thechristcollege.Blackboard.com.

BYOD Technology Requirements, Recommendations and Support

Added 5/23/17, Edited 9/19/17, Updated 42019

Hardware and Software Requirements

Students entering the BSN and RN-BSN programs (effective August 2017) will be required to possess a Windows or Mac based laptop that complies with the technical requirements identified below. (For all other students, the items bulleted below are not required but will best support success in coursework at TCCNHS.) Laptops unable to meet hardware and software requirements are not acceptable for use. Public computers, Chromebooks, tablets and smartphones will not suffice as a primary device.

  • Processor: Intel i-series (No AMD processors)
  • RAM: Minimum 4GB; 8 GB preferred. Memory directly affects computer performance when running multiple applications at once.
  • Hard Drive: Minimum 125GB Hard Drive. Free disk space is required for software installation and downloading books. Certain software components require installation for full functionality in online courses.
  • Sound – Video Recording: Working speakers are required. Some courses will require a webcam and microphone, additionally. Course-specific technology requirements can be found in course syllabi.
  • Microsoft Office: The web-based version of Office 365 will be provided to students, accessible via the College Computer Lab(s) and/or Citrix.
  • Wireless Network, On Campus: When on campus, students have access to the Wi-Fi network CON-Student. For best results in connecting, students should have an 802.11ac WiFi adapter, or an 802.11n adapter with support for the 5 GHz frequency band. Student laptops are not permitted to be used on other TCHHN Wi-Fi networks or the TCHHN wired (Ethernet) network.
  • High-Speed Internet Connection, Off Campus: For online learning activities completed off campus, DSL or cable is strongly recommended. A direct connection to a modem/router is also recommended for best results, when off campus. Dial up and satellite internet connections will not suffice for all online learning activities.
  • Plug-Ins: The most recent versions of the following plug-ins are required for use in TCCNHS courses: Adobe Reader, JavaScript, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Shockwave. Mac and Windows users can download Video Lan Client (VLC) to play Windows Media files. Uncheck any additional offers prior to updating or installing the plug-ins listed above.
  • Operating System: Windows 10 or macOS 10.12 or newer.
  • Virus Protection: Students are required to have current antivirus protection installed and running on their laptops.

o For Windows 10 users Windows Defender is already installed. If you feel you need something more robust you can look at Sophos as an alternative.

o For Mac users, Sophos is a highly regarded free antivirus program.

o For malware concerns Malwarebytes is recommended for Windows and Mac users. It does not run in the background, so a scan should be initiated on a regular basis (eg., daily/weekly/monthly) or if malware is suspected.

NOTES:

• Blackboard (Bb) is the Learning Management System for TCCNHS.

• Students should verify minimum requirements for Bb using the Blackboard Browser

Checker located on TCCNHS’s Bb login page at https://thechristcollege.blackboard.com/

• Blackboard Collaborate is TCCNHS’s web conferencing and virtual classroom tool. More information can be found at https://en-us.help.blackboard.com/Collaborate/Ultra/Participant

• Specific curricula for TCCNHS courses may require additional software purchases. These requirements will be provided in the course syllabi.

• The Plug-Ins and Virus Protection listed above can be easily accessed on the BYOD page in Blackboard.

• Students are expected to bring their laptops fully charged for classroom activities and must have administrator access (i.e., the ability to install software). Tips for maximizing battery life can be found on the BYOD page in Blackboard, and use of a portable charger is strongly recommended (more details, below). Testing periods can be lengthy (four hours or more), and while some charging stations are available in instructional spaces, they are limited. Faculty have no obligation to allow students to re-test or make up other classroom activities should a student’s battery fail.

• No student will be denied admission to Christ College based on an inability to purchase a laptop. Financial aid funding may be available to assist students with their computer purchases.

College Technology Recommendations

Internet Browser Add-Ons:

AdBlock Plus: The AdBlock Plus add-on prevents annoying and potentially-malicious advertisements from appearing on frequently visited webpages, including Flash-based ads and popup ads. It can also be configured to block domains known to spread malware, protecting against viruses, Trojan horses, worms, spyware, and adware.

NoScript: The NoScript add-on blocks all scripts from running on a web page unless scripts are specifically permitted. Many kinds of malware are launched via scripts on webpages. These scripts can run in the background, and there may be no indication of an infection until the computer and its data have been compromised. NoScript may require an extra click here and there to set the permissions for various web pages, but it will serve as another line of defense to prevent infections.

All of these programs can be easily accessed on the Ed Tech page in Blackboard.

Portable Charger: A charger that is 30000 Milliamp Hours (mAh) or above, and compatible with the laptop’s power ports. This will be especially important for use during testing periods.

Printer: If you prefer to have printed rather than electronic documents, you will need a printer that is compatible with your laptop. (On-site printing is also available to students.)

IT Support

The Educational Technology Department will provide on-site support for student laptops only as it relates to use of TCCNHS programs such as Blackboard, Citrix, or e-books. This may include, but is not limited to guidance for installation, registration, use and troubleshooting problems. Ed Tech does not provide support for students’ laptops with regard to installation or repair of hardware, installation or configuration of operating systems or third party software, and the removal of viruses and other malware. The rental/purchase, installation and maintenance of required laptop hardware and software are the responsibility of the student.

Christ College maintains no responsibility for supporting personal hardware or software. Any technical assistance does not infer any further technology responsibility or accountability to the user. Users needing troubleshooting assistance beyond TCCNHS system software (e.g., for slow response time) will be referred to a third party vendor. The Ed Tech Department additionally does not support tablet device issues beyond those resulting from TCCNHS system software.

Computer Labs

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences provides a Computer Lab for student use, located in Room 216. This Lab houses 44 partitioned PC workspaces and a networked, multifunctional copy/print/scan device. Satellite Labs are located in rooms 232, 243, the Student Lounge on B-Level, and the Library (located on the first floor of the Christ Hospital building). Each Satellite Lab contains a networked laser printer for student use. The availability of these spaces will be published in a calendar that is posted each week to the outside of each room and on the Ed Tech page in Blackboard. The main Computer Lab is often booked for testing, so students should use the calendar to plan ahead with regard to computer and printer use on campus. Free Wi-Fi is also provided to students in the College and Hospital buildings.

Hours of Operation

The Main and Satellite Computer Labs are open daily for students with badge access to the building. The lab spaces may be reserved for classroom instruction, course exams, standardized testing, registration or training, but designated periods of time are set aside for students’ use. Calendars of availability can be found on the Ed Tech page in Blackboard and outside of each lab space.

Usage

Software installed on lab workstations should not be modified, copied or removed, and users are not permitted to install software on the workstations without permission of Ed Tech staff. Workstations are not to be used for business unrelated to the College.

At no time should files of any sort be downloaded from the Internet. This includes toolbars, file converters, or application updates. All application updates will be managed by the Educational Technology Department.

Maintenance

Hardware and software maintenance is performed routinely on computer lab workstations to ensure that all devices are functional and updated. At the end of each semester, the labs are cleaned and equipment is tested. Student files stored to the desktop are removed.

Etiquette

No eating or drinking is permitted in the labs. Consideration of others working in the Labs is essential.

Acceptable Use Policy

Updated 5/22/17

The use of technology resources creates and expands teaching and learning opportunities that support the efforts of the TCCNHS community to satisfy its mission and vision. Access to these resources is a privilege, and use of them requires the acknowledgement and acceptance of specific responsibilities to ensure that the integrity and security of the systems not be compromised in any way.

The statements that follow reflect the standards and expectations for acceptable and responsible use to be adhered to by members of Christ College, its constituents, and any authorized user of these resources. TCCNHS, as a member of The Christ Hospital Health Network (TCHHN or The Network), shares and benefits from the technology resources provided and managed by TCHHN. Therefore, TCCNHS is guided by the information security policies created by TCHHN.

The use of technology resources and all information maintained in any form is subject to laws, regulations, contracts, licenses, policies, and procedures as established by Christ College. This policy broadly applies to all on- and off-campus college and student organization-sponsored events and activities.

Users of Christ College technology resources are expected to comply with all policies related to the acceptable, responsible, and lawful use of technology resources. Failure to do so is considered a conduct violation that will be investigated and resolved according to applicable college policy such as the Student Code of Conduct and Behaviors of Accountability. Depending on the circumstances, infractions may result in disciplinary action up to and including suspension or expulsion/termination, revocation of system access privileges, and/or prosecution. Appeals are handled in accordance with college policy. Christ College and/or The Network may monitor their technology resources to ensure user compliance with applicable policies.

Christ College and/or TCHHN may monitor their technology resources to ensure user compliance with applicable policies. If infractions are discovered, either entity will take appropriate action. The entities will also cooperate with all legitimate law enforcement agencies regarding investigations and relevant search and seizure laws.

User Responsibility and Accountability

• Users are responsible for knowing and abiding by all Christ College policies and procedures applicable to the use of technology resources.

• A user is the steward of all technology resources at his/her access and all associated information.

• Christ College provides technology resources for the purpose of education, research, and professional purposes. Incidental personal use of TCCNHS technology resources is permissible, but it should be limited. With regard to support, priority will be given to individuals using technology resources for academic or professional purposes.

• Users are prohibited from using Christ College technology resources for personal financial gain or for solicitation efforts that do not directly relate to college business or interests.

• Users who observe infractions of this policy should report violations immediately to Educational Technology Department personnel.

Security

General

All Christ College users are responsible to abide by TCCHNS and TCHHN policies and procedures for maintaining the privacy and security of technology resources and associated information. Users should help keep Christ College and TCHHN infrastructure safe by remembering the following guidelines when accessing the TCCNHS technology infrastructure.

  • Configuration settings must not be modified on Christ College computers.
  • Personal health information may not be copied, scanned, or captured by any electronic means.
  • Software and programs cannot be copied without written permission from Christ College.
  • A user‘s personal device may not be configured to operate as a server accessible by other computers via the Internet.
  • Any use of the technology infrastructure for illegal purposes is prohibited.
  • Users must take precautions against importing and spreading computer viruses.
  • Deliberate attempts to interfere with the technology infrastructure or to circumvent privacy and security safeguards are prohibited.
  • Christ College technology resources may not be used for unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, commercial gain, solicitation, advertisement, or promotion of commercial services or products.
  • Christ College technology resources may not be used for unauthorized peer-to-peer (P2P) digital file sharing as provided by the Christ College Copyright Policy.
  • Cloud Based Storage – Dropbox, Google Drive – may not be used on the TCHHN network.
  • Christ College computers are installed with the basic software and applications needed to meet the needs of students. Configurations should not be modified, nor should programs be copied or removed. Additional software should not be installed without permission. Non-TCCNHS related materials should not be added, nor should devices be used for outside business or commercial purposes.
  • Christ College constituents should never permit external vendors or support technicians to access TCCNHS-issued computers for the purpose of troubleshooting or solving hardware problems.

Mobile and Electronic Devices

(Laptops, Tablets, Cell Phones, Smartwatches etc.)

Mobile devices allow users ease, flexibility, efficiency, and can enhance productivity. What must be considered with the use of mobile devices for business in and out of the workplace is the importance of ensuring that the devices be kept safe from loss or theft, and more importantly, the effectiveness of the safety measures on the device to keep the data secure.

  • Personal devices should not be left unattended. Flash or USB drives should be kept with the owner at all times.
  • Users must remain aware of the risks associated with connecting mobile devices to unsecured networks such as those that may be found in public wi-fi locations.
  • Access to mobile devices should be guarded through the use of a logon name and password. This includes tablets and smartphones. In alignment with TCHHN policies, if confidential or sensitive data is stored on a removable storage devices (like a USB flash drive) the device should be encrypted.

Christ College allows the responsible use and transport of cell phones, cameras, smart watches, and other personal electronic devices. Users of these electronic devices must be sensitive to the needs, sensibilities, and rights of other people.

The following actions are prohibited:

  • Photographing, videotaping, or recording any individual without his or her consent.
  • Photographing, videotaping, or recording test questions, simulation or skills lab procedures, or other protected academic information without authorized Christ College instructor consent.
  • Use of devices that interfere with the functions of Christ College by disrupting others‘ use of technology resources or their ability to participate in educational programs or activities, specifically in classrooms, laboratories, clinical settings, or within any facility utilized by Christ College.
  • Using these devices, even as a calculator, on tests and in the clinical setting, unless approved by the instructor.
  • Failing to set phones and/or pagers to vibrate or silent mode while in the classroom or clinical setting.

Password Security

Students are provided with accounts and passwords that give access to Christ College resources. It is expected that these users will keep logon information secure. Passwords should not be shared. All passwords are confidential, and users are solely responsible and held accountable for all actions taken under their passwords.

To maintain the privacy and confidentiality of all passwords, users should abide by the following guidelines:

  • Do not share passwords with anyone, including family and friends.
  • Change a password when there is any suspicion that it is no longer secure.
  • Log off or lock a desktop when leaving a workstation.
  • Do not gain or attempt to gain access to another person‘s user ID and/or password.

Data Backups

It is the user’s responsibility to maintain the integrity of data to prevent loss that could lead to academic penalties. Students are therefore expected to back up data (including assignments submitted via Blackboard) on a continual basis. There are many free and low-cost options available for backing up data, ranging from external hard drives to online backup and storage services. Students that experience problems with their computers that lead to data loss within 24 hours of an assignment being due should contact their course instructor(s) immediately in order to document that the loss of data prevented them from completing an assignment. Students who do not backup their data or consult with their instructors will be liable for any academic penalty associated with incomplete or missing assignments.

Email

Outlook email is the official method for electronic communication at TCCNHS. Outlook webmail is available for remote access. All students are provided with an account. Access to email is authenticated with the same username and password that is used to logon to the network.

Email should be used primarily as it relates to Christ College business and activities. It also can be used for personal communications provided that doing so does not impact negatively on the network’s mail system or an individual’s work or student performance. Christ College email addresses should not be used in conjunction with personal services such as eBay, shopping services such as Amazon, or for other personal business needs. TCHHN may block incoming and outgoing email messages associated with these types of service providers.

Attachments to email are acceptable but cannot exceed 5MB. Users must take care in opening emails with attachments or embedded links, especially if the sender is an unfamiliar name. Email attachments can be sources for a variety of malware that can be hidden in the text of the attachment.

Christ College email is owned by the TCHHN enterprise and as such can be monitored, blocked, or removed at the discretion of email administrators, particularly if there is concern that an email will compromise the security or integrity of the email system. Permission from the user is not required.

Christ College email should not be used to promote or solicit for activities or events not associated with or supported by Christ College. Privacy is to be respected, and the use of email distribution lists should be considered under need-to-know situations. The circulation of textual or graphic content considered to be pornographic or obscene is prohibited.

There are security risks associated with Christ College email being sent and received on personal mobile devices due to the sensitivity or confidentiality associated with the content of some mail messages. Therefore, a security access request form must be submitted and approved for access to be granted.

Mailboxes should be monitored by the user and periodically cleaned out of messages no longer needed. This helps in the maintenance and efficiency of the overall mail system by reducing the need for storage and time to backup mail messages.

The email accounts of students receiving their Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) are terminated at the beginning of the semester following graduation. ADN students use their Christ College email address in conjunction with registering for their licensing exam and correspondence continues post-graduation. The accounts for students receiving their Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN) are terminated within the month following graduation. The accounts of students who withdrawn from Christ College prior to graduation are terminated within three days of withdrawal.

Email usage must comply with college policy as well as local, state, and federal laws. Official Christ College communications will be sent to users via Christ College provided email address, and students are held responsible for all information sent from Christ College to this address.

Remember the following rules when utilizing Christ College email:

  • Users are expected to check their TCCNHS email daily and respond, where appropriate, within two business days.
  • Email communications should be professional.
  • Users are expressly prohibited from accessing or sending any messages or materials containing discriminatory, sexually explicit, offensive language, humor, or images.
  • Sending or responding to chain letters/messages not related to Christ College is prohibited.
  • Christ College is not responsible for lost, rejected, or delayed email forwarded from a student‘s official Christ College e-mail address to off-campus or unsupported email services or providers.

Internet

Internet access is provided as an educational resource. Internet usage must comply with Christ College policy as well as local, state, and federal laws.

The following actions are prohibited:

  • Engaging in Internet activity that is illegal or unethical.
  • Participating in activities involving discriminatory, sexually explicit, and/or offensive content.
  • Disseminating confidential information.
  • Misusing copyrighted or intellectual property.

Christ College does not condone the use of Christ College technology resources, including the Christ College network, for any unauthorized Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file sharing. P2P file sharing may be defined as the sharing and transferring of digital files from one computer to another when the computers are connected over the Internet, a network, or through a physical connection. It is a violation of copyright law to engage in P2P file sharing, such as through the use of file sharing software (e.g., BitTorrent, KaZaA, Limewire, etc.) to download music, movies, and other copyrighted material without permission from the copyright holder.

Any such unauthorized P2P is a violation of, and will be governed by, the Christ College Copyright Policy. Alternatives to illegal downloading include, but are not limited to, iTunes,

Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu.

Users who engage in unauthorized P2P file sharing on Christ College network will be subject to the Christ College Copyright Policy. Such users may also be held liable for the infringement of copyrighted works (music, movies, computer software, video games, and photographs). Christ College is under no legal obligation to defend or accept responsibility for the illegal actions of its technology users in the P2P context. It is each individual‘s responsibility to know what constitutes infringement of copyright. Refer to the Christ College Copyright Policy for additional copyright information.

Printing, Copying and Faxing

TCCNHS computers are all configured with access to printers. Printing is a network resource and as such should be used responsibly. Printing should be limited to college-related documents. Users need to be mindful that the maintenance and support for printers can be expensive, but that proper use of this equipment can keep costs to a minimum. Most TCCNHS printers include options for efficient printing and are set to do so. These configurations should not be changed unless necessary.

Students may be provided with recommendations for the efficient printing of PowerPoints and are advised not to print their e-books.

Using printers, copiers, or scanners for the purpose of duplicating copyrighted materials without permission is prohibited. A statement of Christ College’s copyright practice can be found in the Student Policies and Procedures section of The College Catalog.

User Rights and Privileges

Freedom from Disruption

Christ College strives to provide a technology infrastructure during business hours that is stable, accessible, and responsive. Maintenance procedures that are potentially disruptive to the infrastructure (e.g., system upgrades) are planned in advance and implemented during off-hours whenever possible. Unplanned disruptions (e.g., a system goes offline) may occur periodically. Such unplanned disruptions will be communicated promptly.

Applicability of Other Policies

This document is part of TCHHN’s cohesive set of security policies published here: http://mytch.tchhn.org/sites/search/Pages/formsetc.aspx#k=4.24. (You must be on the Hospital Network to access the link.) Other policies inform the topics covered in this document and, as such, the relevant policies should be reviewed as necessary for applicability and adherence.

Digital Signage

Student organizations may submit requests for posting events/information on the College’s Digital Signage through the appropriate Faculty Advisor. (Faculty Advisors should refer to the Digital Signage Policy in the College Manual for Faculty and Staff.)

Student Policies

Student Complaints

Policy

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences provides several means by which student complaints may be addressed. In all cases, students are advised to put their concerns in writing and carefully document the events that led to the complaint.

A complaint can be defined as a statement or an expression of discontent, dissatisfaction, or unacceptable circumstances or conditions. Complaints may be academic or non-academic in nature. A complaint against a College employee (faculty or staff) or representative arises when a student believe he or she has been subjected to inappropriate behavior by a department or College representative acting within their role or duty. A complaint of personal misconduct by a College employee arises when a student believes he or she is the subject of inappropriate behavior outside of the employee’s role and duties within the College. Complaints may also arise from unfulfilled expectations related to college processes; for example, advising, academic accommodations, or maintaining a safe environment.

All complaints, concerns, and suggestions made by students and the reaction to them by the College are handled in the spirit of continuous quality improvement. No retribution against any individual complainant may be taken by any faculty member, staff member, or College committee because of the complaint. All student concerns and complaints are taken seriously and kept confidential. The College’s Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment & Misconduct, and Retaliation policies and procedures will be invoked when a complaint involves these issues. The College’s Disability Related Grievance Procedure should be utilized when there is a complaint involving disability discrimination (for example, when a reasonable accommodation is not received).

Procedure

Whenever possible, students are encouraged to seek an informal resolution of the matter directly with the faculty or individual(s) involved. While students may be tempted to “start at the top” and contact administration first, it is important to attempt to resolve the matter first with the person against whom the complaint is directed. Then, if the matter is unresolved, the student may proceed according to the chains of command defined by the department. (Students should reference programmatic handbooks and/or academic advisors for assistance.) Each department that receives student complaints will maintain a record of those complaints and their resolutions. If an informal approach is neither successful nor advisable, the student should use the following procedure:

  1. For all issues of an academic nature (the assignment of a course grade, for example), refer to the Grade Appeal Policies and Procedure and the Grievance and Due Process Procedure.
  2. For non-academic complaints, a student should submit the complaint in writing to the Dean of College Support Services. It should contain (at a minimum) the date and time of the alleged conflict or action, the reason(s) for the complaint, a summary of the complaint, a list of other persons who may provide information, and any appropriate documentation. The student must also include the resolution or outcome he or she is seeking. The complaint must be submitted within ten (10) business days of the alleged conflict or action.

Examples of non-academic complaints:

  • > Academic Advising
  • > Admissions Appeals
  • > Facilities
  • > Missing Deadlines (add/drop, withdrawal, graduation)
  • > Non-Academic Misconduct
  • > Non-Academic Suspension
  • > Registration and Records
  • > Student Accounts (ex. payment deadlines, contesting charges, financial refunds, non-payment suspensions)
  • > Student Parking

a. Upon receipt of a written complaint, a conference will take place with the student and the Dean of College Support Services or designee.

b. The Dean of College Support Services or designee will notify the appropriate person(s) and request any information or documentation needed to resolve the complaint.

c. The Dean of College Support Services or designee may attempt to resolve the complaint by encouraging discussion between the student(s) and the faculty member/administrator or by taking the appropriate action to resolve the complaint.

d. All relative documentation and possible outcomes must be submitted by the student or other appropriate persons within ten (10) business days of the date the complaint is filed.

e. When possible, the final resolution (or a finding of “unresolved”) will be filed with the Dean of College Support Services within fifteen (15) business days of the date the complaint is filed. If there are circumstances requiring an extension of this deadline, the Dean of College Support Services or designee will notify the parties involved.

f. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of the complaint, the student has three (3) business days upon receipt to appeal to the College President.

g. The President has five (5) business days upon receipt of the student’s appeal to render a decision. While the President’s decision is considered final and the process is complete, the student will be advised of possible additional options including, but not limited to, an additional third party (i.e. Office of Compliance) reviewing specifics of a particular case.

Documentation

An annual summary account of academic and non-academic complaints and their resolutions will be kept by Office of the Dean of Operations. The summary will be reviewed annually to improve processes, where applicable.

Reference: The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (2012). Policy and Procedures on Student Complaints. Available at http://www.utc.edu/administration/deanofstudents/complaint/php.

Complaints to The Higher Learning Commission

The Higher Learning Commission has established a clear distinction between individual grievances and complaints that appear to involve broad institutional practices. Where a complaint does raise issues regarding the institution’s ongoing ability to meet the Criteria of Accreditation, the Commission forwards the complaint to the institution and requests a formal response. HLC Contact information:

The Higher Learning Commission, Member of the North Central Association

230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500

Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411

Phone: (312) 263-0456

Fax: (312) 263-7462

info@hlcommission.org

Complaints to the Ohio Department of Higher Education

Edited 10/5/16

The Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) is responsible for responding to formal complaints against public, independent non-profit and proprietary institutions of higher education in Ohio. While the ODHE has limited authority over colleges and universities, and cannot offer legal advice or initiate civil court cases, ODHE staff will review submitted complaints and work with student complainants and institutions.

Ohio Department of Higher Education

25 South Front Street Columbus, OH 43215

General: (614) 466-6000 Fax: (614) 466-5866

https://www.ohiohighered.org/students/complaints

Complaints to the Ohio Attorney General

The Ohio Attorney General reviews general consumer complaints about business, non-profit and public entities. More information is available via the Attorney General’s office and website.

Ohio Attorney General

30 E. Broad St., 14th Floor

Columbus, OH 43215

General: (800) 282-0515

http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/about-ag/file-a-complaint.aspx

Grievance and Fair Treatment Procedures

When a student believes there has been inequitable application of a policy, the matter may qualify for the student to initiate his or her due process rights via the College’s stated grievance procedures. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences provides a grievance procedure whereby students may express their grievances with the assurance there will be a complete, impartial, and prompt attempt to resolve the grievance. The College’s Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment & Misconduct, and Retaliation policies and procedures will be invoked when a complaint involves these issues. The College’s Disability Related Grievance Procedure should be utilized when there is a complaint involving disability discrimination (for example, when a reasonable accommodation is not received).

SPECIAL NOTES: A College/program/course policy in and of itself is not grievable.

Procedural Overview

  1. Every student complaint or problem will be reviewed by appropriate individuals or entities of the College. This is not to be interpreted that every complaint or problem rises to the definition of grievance.
  2. It is desirable that every problem be resolved as quickly and as closely to the source as possible.
  3. Timelines are imposed to assure prompt action.
  4. The rights of the student must always be respected and all information kept confidential.
  5. The purpose is to protect the student’s right to fair treatment in academic or non-academic matters. Students who wish to appeal a final course grade (because the grade might have been miscalculated or assigned unfairly) should first follow the Grade Appeal Policy and Procedure outlined in this Catalog. If that Grade Appeal is denied but the student believes a relevant policy has been applied inequitably, it may be appropriate to then pursue Grievance and Due Process Procedures.

Terminology

  • Informal Grievance Process: A non-written process serving as an opportunity to resolve differences at the appropriate level. This is a scheduled/planned discussion between the involved parties. This must be completed before the formal grievance policy is pursued.
  • Formal Grievance Process: A written process that is initiated when the outcome of the Informal Grievance Process is not acceptable to the student and offers one pathway:
  • Grievance Panel Review: A process in which a panel of three (3) faculty members and two (2) students review the grievance and determine an outcome.
  • Grievance Facilitator: Serves as a consultant during initiation of the Formal Grievance Process to verify adherence to the procedure, receives the student’s written complaint for the Formal Grievance Process, convenes the Grievance Review Panel, and serves as an advisor to the Panel but has no voting rights.
  • Grievance Procedure Form: The tool to verify adherence to the timelines and the procedure. This form is obtained following a discussion with the Grievance Facilitator, if necessary.
  • Business Day: Any day the College is officially open for business.

Student Grievance Procedure

  1. Eligibility: All students are eligible to use the Grievance Procedure.
  2. There is one (1) available Pathway: Grievance Panel Review.
  3. Paperwork will be retained in the student’s file with one copy provided to the student at the completion of the Formal Grievance Process.

Informal Grievance Process

The Informal Grievance Process must be completed prior to advancing to the Formal Grievance Process.

Step 1: The student must discuss and document the matter with the faculty or staff member involved within three (3) business days of the event or situation.

Step 2: If the outcome is not satisfactory, the student must discuss and document the matter with the Dean of College Support Services or designee within three (3) business days of meeting with the faculty or staff member.

Step 3: If the outcome of the discussion with the Dean of College Support Services or designee is not satisfactory, the student has three (3) business days to initiate the Formal Grievance Process by meeting with the Grievance Facilitator (contact the Office of the President for more information).

Formal Grievance Process

Step 1: The student initiates the Formal Grievance Process. The student meets with the Grievance Facilitator to discuss the issue(s) presented by the student and whether the matter rises to the definition of due process rights violation. This must occur within three (3) business days of completing the Informal Grievance Process.

  • At the direction of the Grievance Facilitator, the student obtains the Grievance Procedure Form.
  • The student reviews the directions and completes the form.

Step 2: The student must file a formal, non-electronic written complaint with the Grievance Facilitator within three (3) business days of receiving the Grievance Procedure Form.

Step 3: The Grievance Facilitator assembles the Review Panel members.

Step 4: The Grievance Review Panel convenes within five (5) business days after Step 3 of the Formal Process.

Step 5: The Grievance Facilitator prepares a written summation of the decision within five (5) business days of the Panel’s initial meeting and forwards this to the President for review.

Step 6: The President has five (5) business days to meet with the Grievance Facilitator to discuss the decision. If necessary, for clarification, the President may meet with the Panel. The President will review the Panel’s decision to ensure compliance with institutional policies and procedures. If necessary, the President of the College may send the grievance back to the Panel or convene a new grievance panel.

Step 7: Once Step 7 has been completed, the Grievance Facilitator will share the final decision with the student. The decision of the Grievance Review Panel is final. The student receives a copy of the decision and a copy is filed in the student’s record along with the Grievance Procedure Form. The Grievance Panel’s decision is final and the process is completed.

Office of General Counsel Review

It is important to note that in all situations, where appropriate, the final decision and evidence may also be forwarded to the Office of General Counsel, a separate office affiliated with The Christ Hospital Health Network. This office is charged with ensuring that policies and procedures align and comply with federal, state, and local laws. In such instances, the individual will be notified that their grievance has been filed with the Office of General Counsel for further review. The Office of Compliance may investigate the entire situation and recommend a different decision than made by the Grievance Panel. In such cases, the Office of General Counsel’s recommendation(s) may supersede any and all College decisions.

This policy is subject to periodic review and change. All changes will be communicated appropriately.

Behaviors of Accountability

As a student at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, you will be expected to demonstrate the following behaviors related to accountability:

  1. Report to class and clinical on time.
  2. Turn in work (assignments) on time.
  3. Follow the College and program attendance policies.
  4. Exhibit honesty.
  5. Refrain from cheating or stealing.
  6. Refrain from repeating unacceptable behavior(s).
  7. Admit errors as soon as discovered.
  8. Seek assistance as needed from appropriate person(s) and/or resources.
  9. Demonstrate responsibility for previous and ongoing learning (i.e., reviewing materials/notes from previous classes; completing assigned readings before coming to class, etc.).
  10. Refrain from engaging in destructive criticism/communication/discussions.
  11. Follow the policies of institutions that you visit as a student of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.
  12. Treat self and others with respect.
  13. Report unethical behaviors in a timely manner and unsafe conditions immediately.
  14. Adhere to the College Code of Conduct, outlined below.

Student Code of Conduct

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences expects students to conduct themselves in a manner that reflects respect for others as well as themselves. The administration of the College of Nursing may suspend or terminate a student in incidences in which documented proof indicates that the behavior is inconsistent with the responsibilities of citizenship or the healthcare profession.

Criteria:

Incidences which result in the student being suspended or terminated include but are not limited to:

  1. Chemical Abuse: Defined as the unauthorized possession or use of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, other controlled substances or drugs on campus or involved in activity representing the College. Possession or use of drug abuse instruments, drug documents, and harmful intoxication is included in this rule, as well as appearing intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol, narcotics or other controlled substances or drugs.
  2. Unauthorized Possession of Property: Defined as the unauthorized use or possession of another’s property.
  3. Falsification of Records: Defined as the falsification of student applications, transcripts, or health records, or the falsification of any patient or hospital records.
  4. Breach of Confidentiality: Defined as the act of relating or imparting any confidential information regarding patients to unauthorized persons.

NOTE: Any student who violates federal, state, or local regulations may also be subject to civil or criminal action.

Disciplinary Procedures

TCCNHS expects the conduct of its students on and off campus to be in accordance with the Behaviors of Accountability and the Code of Conduct. Students violating any College regulation or participating in criminal activity will be subject to disciplinary action. The goal of the disciplinary procedure is to determine whether Behaviors of Accountability and/or Code of Conduct have been violated and to impose sanctions for any such violations as fairly as is reasonably possible under the circumstances. The following procedure will be utilized to evaluate misconduct or infractions of a serious nature. If at any time it appears the student’s conduct may present clear and present danger to the campus community, the Dean of College Support Services may suspend the accused student immediately, pending further investigation.

Step 1: After becoming aware of alleged student misconduct, the Dean of College Support Services (CSS) will conduct a reasonable investigation of the situation. The Dean of CSS will recuse him/herself if a conflict of interest exists and will appoint another investigator in such cases. The investigation may include a personal interview with the alleged student, witnesses, or others with information pertaining to the alleged misconduct. It may involve verifying alleged criminal activity with law enforcement. The investigation may be conducted in consultation with appropriate administrative officer(s), Safety and Security, Human Resources Department, and others, as needed.

Step 2: The Dean of College Support Services will determine if a violation occurred using the preponderance of the evidence standard. If evidence supports the alleged misconduct, the Dean of College Support Services will determine the appropriate sanctions.

Sanctions

Non-Academic Probation or Suspension

Non-Academic Probation refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences who has been placed on probation for non-academic reasons determined by the Dean of College Support Services. Non-Academic Probation is a warning period of time that may include a student improvement plan. During the probationary period of time, further infractions may lead to suspension or dismissal.

Non-Academic Suspension refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences who has been placed on suspension for non-academic reasons. Students may be prohibited from attending scheduled classes, clinical learning experiences, and College-sponsored events for a specific period of time.

A student may be placed on probation or suspended for the following reasons:

  • Lack of integrity.
  • Violation of College, Christ Hospital, or clinical or community agency policies.
  • Violation of local, state, or federal laws.
  • Conviction of a crime.
  • Failure to meet financial obligations to the College.
  • Other misconduct.

Determination of probation or suspension is dependent on the severity of the violation.

If a student is suspended, the following consequences may result:

  • If an exam, quiz or other assignment is given or due during the period of suspension, the student incurs an automatic “0” with no opportunity for make-up.
  • Any missed time resulting from suspension will be recorded as an absence.
  • Length of suspension and the terms for removal from suspension are determined on an individual basis.

Non-Academic Dismissal

Non-Academic Dismissal refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences who has been dismissed from the College for non-academic reasons.

A student may be dismissed for the following reasons:

  • Lack of integrity.
  • Dishonesty.
  • Violation of College, Christ Hospital, or clinical or community agency policies.
  • Violation of local, state, or federal laws.
  • Conviction of a crime.
  • Other misconduct.
  • Failure to meet financial obligations of the College.
  • Lack of responsiveness to College representatives.

SPECIAL NOTES: Reinstatement following dismissal or termination is not automatic. The student must re-apply to the College, and that application must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the College.

Appeal

The student may appeal the disciplinary process decision only on the following grounds:

  • The decision was contrary to the substantial weight of the evidence;
  • There is a substantial likelihood that newly discovered information was not available previously and may result in a different outcome;
  • Bias or prejudice on the part of the Dean of College Support Services or the official imposing punishment; or
  • The punishment or corrective action imposed is disproportionate to the offense committed.

The following procedures apply to the filing of an appeal:

  1. The appeal must be filed within five (5) calendar days of receipt of written notification of the resolution of the complaint. It must be in writing and be submitted to Chief Academic Officer. It must contain the following information:
  • Name of the student;
  • A statement of the resolution of the disciplinary action, including sanction(s) imposed, if any;
  • A detailed statement of the basis for the appeal, including the specific facts, circumstances and argument in support of it; and
  • The requested action, if any
  • The appellant may request a meeting with the Chief Academic Officer, but the decision to grant a meeting is entirely within that official‘s discretion.
  • The Chief Academic Officer has seven (7) calendar days to make a decision.
  • The student will be notified in writing of that decision within five (5) calendar days after the decision is made. The appeal decision is final.

Step 3: The Dean of College Support Services and the Chief Academic Officer if an appeal is used, will document the student investigation, sanctions, and appeal.

Student Bill of Rights and Responsibilities

Each student is responsible for being knowledgeable of and acting in accordance with the Code of Conduct and Behaviors of Accountability.

  1. Students are encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and engage in a sustained and independent search for truth.
  2. The freedom to teach and the freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom: students must exercise their freedom in a responsible and respectful manner.
  3. Each institution has a duty to develop policies and procedures that provide and safeguard the students’ freedom to learn.
  4. Under no circumstances will a student be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, ethnicity, age, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, veteran status, disability, or economic status.
  5. Students are free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled.
  6. Students have a right to protection through orderly procedures against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation, but they are responsible for maintaining standards of academic performance established for each course in which they are enrolled.
  7. Information about student views, beliefs, political ideation, or sexual orientation which instructors acquire in the course of their work or otherwise, should be considered confidential and not released without the knowledge or consent of the student, and should not be used as a basis of evaluation.
  8. The College has a carefully considered policy as to the information which should be a part of a student’s permanent educational record and as to the conditions of this disclosure.
  9. Students and student organizations are free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express opinions publicly and privately.
  10. Students are allowed to invite and to hear any person of their own choosing within the institution’s acceptable realm, thereby taking the responsibility of furthering their education.
  11. The student body has clearly defined means to participate in the formulation and application of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs, e.g., through Student Congress membership or representation on faculty committees.
  12. The institution has an obligation to clarify those standards of behavior which it considers essential to its educational mission, its community life, or its objectives and philosophy.
  13. Disciplinary proceedings are instituted for violations of standards of conduct. It is the responsibility of the student to know these regulations. Grievance procedures are available for every student.
  14. As citizens and members of an academic community, students have the same freedoms and obligations as the other members of the community.
  15. Students have the right to belong, or refuse to belong, to any organization of their choice.
  16. Students have the right to personal privacy to the extent that the welfare and property of others are respected.
  17. Adequate safety precautions are provided by the College.
  18. Students have a clear mechanism for input into the evaluation of faculty.

Hazing and Bullying

Engaging in hazing is a violation of TCCNHS policy. “Hazing” means doing any act or coercing another, including the person being hazed, to do any act of initiation into any student or other organization that causes or creates a substantial risk of causing mental or physical harm to any person. Bullying, or using aggressive behavior, strength, or influence through an imbalance of power to hurt or harm another is prohibited. This includes bullying via electronic communication, typically referred to as cyber bullying.

Any student who participates in hazing or bullying is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion, pursuant to the Code of Conduct, Title IX, or other applicable policies and procedures.

It is also a violation of policy for an administrator, staff, or faculty member to permit the hazing or bullying of any person. TCCNHS employees who observe or otherwise become aware of either of these behaviors (a) must make a reasonable attempt to prevent it and (2) must immediately report the situation to the appropriate administrator. Incidents involving students are reported to the Dean of College Support Services. Incidents involving an employee are reported to the employee’s manager. When determining whether this paragraph has been violated, TCCNHS will consider whether the employee knew or reasonably should have known of the hazing or bullying and failed to take appropriate action.

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement.

Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.

Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, particularly its FAQ section at www.copyright.gov/help/faq.

The College’s resources may not be used to support the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials. Copyright infringement is prohibited by The College’s Policy on Academic Integrity and by the Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities. Violations of these policies can result in denial of access to The College’s computing resources and/or other disciplinary action, up to and including separation from The College.

E-mail Communication

College Responsibilities

  1. The College is not responsible for any difficulties that may occur in the proper or timely transmission access of e-mail forwarded to an unofficial e-mail address, and any such problems will not absolve students of their responsibility to know, respond, and comply with the content of official communications sent to the students’ College e-mail address.
  2. All use of e-mail in regards to content, disclosure, and access of student educational records to communicate with students is protected by the Family Educational Rights to Privacy Act (FERPA) guidelines including all applicable Christ College policies and procedures. The College maintains confidentiality of student educational records until prior written consent to disclose is given by the student.
  3. According to Federal Privacy Laws, all College students and employees using the College’s official student e-mail accounts must comply, adhere to, and maintain all guidelines and confidentiality of all student educational records in regard to compliance with Family Educational Rights to Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).
  4. The College’s internal e-mail must be utilized for all e-mail communications outside of the classroom between student and faculty.

Student Responsibilities

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to open and read The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences official student e-mails.
  2. The College expects all current students will receive, open, read, and act or respond to all official College e-mails sent in a timely manner, within 2 business days.
  3. Students have the responsibility to recognize and expect certain College communications may be time-critical such as security alerts, campus closures, IT security alerts, financial aid notifications, registration transactions, faculty instruction, or messaging including class status.
  4. Students Should Know: Failure to check messages or receive messages due to full mailboxes, auto forwarded e-mail, error in forwarding e-mail, e-mail returned to the College with “mailbox full” or “user unknown” are not acceptable causes for missing College communications sent by e-mail.
  5. Students are responsible for maintaining their College e-mail account in order to receive official College communications.
  6. The College is not responsible for any difficulties that may occur in the proper or timely transmission or access of e-mail forwarded to an unofficial e-mail address, and any such problems will not absolve students of their responsibility to know, respond, or comply with the content of official communications sent to the student’s College e-mail address.

Etiquette

  1. Treat e-mail messages as any professional communication.
  2. Begin by addressing the receiver by the proper title, i.e., Professor or Doctor.
  3. Keep messages short and be courteous.
  4. Write complete sentences using correct spelling, proper grammar, and punctuation.
  5. State the reason for writing in the subject line.
  6. Do not write in all CAPS–it appears that the sender is screaming and is also considered rude. Use only blue or black Times New Roman or Arial font.
  7. Remember—the message is an e-mail, not a text, so do not use abbreviations that are not pertinent to the course.
  8. Read the message carefully and spell check before you hit send.
  9. Avoid the use of emoticons (smiley faces). While their use may be appropriate in informal messages, they are not commonly acceptable in professional communications.
  10. Never include any confidential information (e.g., passwords) in an e-mail message.

Social Media Policy

The purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines to students regarding their use of social media. Social media is internet-based platforms that are highly accessible to others where individuals can generate content and engage in social interactions. Social media platforms are constantly evolving and include, but are not limited to, Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, etc.

Students at TCCNHS are expected to adhere to the following social media guidelines:

 Use common sense! Remember that little, if anything, is private when posted on social media and you are ultimately responsible for what you post and any consequences that may arise from such postings, whether such consequences are in the personal, professional, or academic realm.

 Think first, post second. Any conduct that could get you in trouble with the College if ac was not involved can also result in disciplinary action when social media is being utilized. For example, threatening or sexually harassing another student via Twitter or Facebook can subject you to College discipline just as if you engaged in such conduct in person.

 Protect confidential, sensitive, and proprietary information. HIPAA guidelines must be followed and you must avoid posting or otherwise disseminating protected health information or other identifiable information related to patients in clinical rotations.

 Respect copyright and other intellectual property rights of others.

 Do not use the College’s logos without prior written permission.

 Do not use the College’s name to promote a product, cause, opinion, business, or political party or candidate.

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 When identifying yourself as a student of TCCNHS, avoid claiming or implying that you are speaking on behalf of the College.

 Cyberbullying and cyberstalking will not be tolerated at TCCNHS.

Violations of this policy will result in a review of the incident by College officials and may include action under appropriate College discipline processes. Corrective action may involve a verbal or written warning, suspension, dismissal and/or revocation of computer privileges at TCCNHS. Disciplinary action for conduct that involves social media and that also violates other College policies is not precluded by this policy.

Student Governance

Updated 5/30/17

Article IX. A. Purpose of the Student Congress

The purpose of the Student Congress is to maintain a spirit of cooperation between the student body and faculty; to improve campus life and promote a sense of community; and to represent the student body in matters that involve faculty and administration.

Article IX. B. Functions of the Student Congress

Based on the purpose of Student Congress, the core functions include:

  1. Promote a sense of community within the College, specifically among students.
  2. Provide learning and service opportunities.
  3. Provide means for communication within the student body.
  4. Advocate for the needs and interests of the student body.
  5. Organize fundraising activities.
  6. Support and promote the mission of the College.

Article IX. C. Membership

All students of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences are general members of Student Congress and are encouraged to attend meetings. Student Congress Officers are elected by their peers.

  1. Nominations for Officers will be accepted during Spring semester, when the call for nominations is announced via email by the Student Congress Faculty/Staff Advisors in February.
  2. Students will be permitted to nominate other students or to self-nominate for Officer positions.
  3. To be eligible for an Officer position, students must have completed one full semester at the College.
  4. Have an overall GPA of 2.5.
  5. Students nominated for Officer positions, should they accept the nomination, will be given a designated period to campaign prior to the election.
  6. The newly elected Officers will attend a joint meeting of new officers and current officers in April and will assume office in May following elections and will serve for a one-year term.

IX. E. Requirements of Student Congress Officers

  1. In order to maintain their position as Officers, students must:

a. Maintain at least a 2.5 GPA. The Student Congress Faculty/Staff Advisors will check the GPAs of all Officers when final grades are posted each semester. Any Officer who does not maintain at least a 2.5 GPA will be suspended from his or her position until the GPA recovers to 2.5 or higher.

b. Maintain an active, positive interest in the well-being of The Christ College community.

c. Communicate with peers, administration, faculty, and staff in a professional manner.

i. A response to personal emails, and group emails, is expected within 48 business hours.

d. Attend Student Congress and College governance meetings as assigned.

i. If unable to attend Student Congress meetings, a written update on the status of all current projects must be provided to the Chair via e-mail in advance of the start of the meeting.

ii. If unable to attend College governance meetings as assigned, the Chair and Vice Chair must be informed in advance so that an alternate Officer may be found to attend instead.

e. Serve the student body and the College in a professional manner.

f. Effectively balance school and personal activities and give the appropriate amount of time necessary to fulfill Student Congress duties. If unable to fulfill assigned duties, Officers are responsible for requesting assistance from the rest of the Board so that duties are not neglected.

g. Only one, the Chair or Vice Chair, can be in their senior year. This will ensure both are not serving at the same time while in their last year of school.

  1. The Officers of the Student Congress Board include:

a. Chair

b. Vice Chair

c. Secretary

d. Social and Community Activities Chair(s) (Up to three students can serve as this role)

e. Fundraising Chair

f. Diversity Chair

g. Educational Chair

  1. Students may hold only one Officer position on Student Congress at a time. Over the course of their time at the College, they may hold multiple positions if nominated and elected.

Students elected to Student Congress Officer positions are not permitted to hold an Officer position in any other student organization.

  1. In the event that an Officer steps down from office or becomes ineligible to serve, the remaining Officers will be responsible for filling the vacancy. The student chosen to fill the vacancy will be subject to Faculty/Staff Advisor approval.

Article IX. F. Duties of Student Congress Officers

  1. Chair

a. Represent the student body as a member of the Delegate Council.

b. May serve only one year as chair.

c. Will set the meetings dates for each semester. Meetings dates will be sent to the Faculty/Staff Advisors no later than August for Fall semester and November for Spring semester.

d. Construct and distribute agendas for Student Congress meetings.

e. Preside over Student Congress meetings.

f. Appoint an acting Secretary to document meeting minutes, if the secretary is not present at the meeting.

g. Cast the deciding vote in the case of a tie.

h. Appoint ad-hoc committees as needed to ensure the proper conduct of the business of Student Congress.

i. Follow up with the other Student Congress Officers to assure completion of projects and fulfillment of duties, recruiting additional assistance as needed.

j. Collaborate with the Faculty/Staff Advisors on the planning and implementation of Student Congress ideas and proposals.

k. Expedite Student Congress business, considering the rights of all members.

l. Invite all students, faculty, and staff to participate in activities of Student Congress, when appropriate.

m. Work with the Student Congress Officers and Faculty/Staff Advisors in planning the annual financial budget.

  1. Vice Chair

a. Represent the student body at Delegate Council meetings in the absence of the Student Congress Chair.

b. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. .

c. Assist the Chair in carrying out Student Congress functions, preside over meetings in the absence of the Chair, and provide additional leadership as able.

d. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress as needed.

e. Collaborate with Student Congress Faculty/Staff Advisors, Officers, and other appropriate individuals when planning special events.

f. Publish a newsletter twice a year, each semester (by the end of August and January), informing students, faculty, and staff of upcoming Student Congress activities and events.

g. Work with the Student Congress Chair, Officers, and Faculty/Staff Advisors in planning the annual financial budget.

  1. Secretary

a. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. If unable to attend a meeting, provide a written update to the Chair on the status of all current projects.

b. Keep accurate minutes and attendance at all Student Congress meetings.

c. Distribute completed minutes via e-mail for review by the Officers and the Faculty/Staff Advisors before the next meeting.

d. Bring a hard copy of approved minutes to each meeting to be signed by the Chair and Secretary. Give signed meeting minutes to the Faculty/Staff Advisor.

e. Faculty/Staff Advisors will place the approved minutes on the College share drive and provide a hard copy to Cheryl Boone.

f. Notify the Chair in advance if unable to attend meetings, so an acting Secretary can be appointed.

g. Have the Student Congress By-Laws and any other pertinent information available at each meeting.

h. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress.

i. Take responsibility for removing all outdated flyers, signs, and newsletters around the College building on a monthly basis.

  1. Social Activities Chair

a. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. If unable to attend a meeting, provide a written update to the Chair on the status of all current projects.

b. Organize committee(s) of Student Congress Officers and other students to help with Social and Community Activities, and serve as the chair of said committee(s). As chair, arrange and plan activities/events focused on building community among the student body, faculty, and staff. The following are the required events:

  1. August- will work with other student groups and Student Success for a welcome back event
  2. September - Student Congress events
  3. December- will chair the Adopt a Family event and work with the other student groups and the Faculty and Staff of the College for successfully implementation.
  4. January - Student Congress events
  5. April- will work with other student groups for an end-of-year event

c. May arrange more College wide events in addition to the above assignments.

d. Present ideas and detailed reports, including estimated budget, at monthly meetings in advance of any proposed activities/events.

e. Collaborate with the Faculty/Staff Advisors on the planning and implementation of proposed activities.

i. Faculty/Staff Advisor will complete the Purchase Approval Form (PAF) and submit to the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences for final approval and issuance of a check or for record of reimbursement of funds.

ii. Send the flyer to advertise the event to Faculty/Staff Advisor for approval and printing.

iii. Take the approved flyers and hang in appropriate places in the College, in alignment with the College’s policy on signage.

f. Provide information on planned events to the Vice Chair for inclusion in the newsletter (by the beginning of August and January).

g. Publicize planned events throughout the College building with flyers, signs, etc. in alignment with the College’s policy on signage.

h. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress as needed.

  1. Fundraising Chair

a. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. If unable to attend a meeting, provide a written update to the Chair on the status of all current projects.

b. Organize fundraising efforts designed to help raise money for Student Congress activities and events, convening appropriate committee(s) as needed to plan and implement fundraising events (at least two per semester).

c. Brainstorm potential fundraising efforts and present proposals at Student Congress meetings.

d. Work collaboratively with advisor(s) for all TCCNHS merchandise orders. Will have at least two sales each semester on a variety of days. Merchandise should be available for evening classes for at least one sale per semester.

e. Coordinate all sale events.

f. Submit the idea approved by Student Congress Officers to the Faculty/Staff Advisors

  1. Faculty/Staff Advisor will complete the PAF and submit to the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences for final approval and issuance of a check or for record of reimbursement of funds.
  2. Fundraising Chair will work collaboratively with advisor(s) to place the order with an approved vendor
  3. Fundraising Chair will work collaboratively with advisor(s) obtain the completed merchandise from the vendor, record the inventory, and organize and publicize merchandise sales College-wide.
  4. Send the flyer to advertise the sales to Faculty/Staff Advisor for approval and printing.
  5. Will take the approved flyers and hang in appropriate places in the College, in alignment with the College’s policy on signage.

g. Organize and maintain an accurate inventory of all TCCNHS merchandise ordered, reporting a summary at monthly meetings. An inventory sheet will be maintained and stored in the inventory closet.

h. Post a current pricing list in the inventory closet for easy access for sales.

i. Report overall progress of the planning and implementation of fundraising efforts at monthly meetings.

j. Include all students, faculty, staff, and alumni in Student Congress fundraising efforts, where appropriate.

k. Provide information on planned events to the Vice Chair for inclusion in the newsletter (by the beginning of August and January).

l. Collaborate with the Faculty/Staff Advisors and Student Congress Officers, as needed, on the planning and implementation of proposed fundraising activities.

m. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress as needed.

  1. Student Diversity Ambassador

a. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. If unable to attend a meeting, provide a written update to the Chair on the status of all current projects.

b. Serve as a student liaison between Diversity and Inclusion Committee and the students at the College.

c. Attend at least three (3) Diversity and Inclusion Committee meetings per year.

d. In collaboration with the Social Chair, plan and coordinate at least one student event focused on Diversity and Inclusion each year.

e. Report activities of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee to the Student Congress.

f. Provide information on planned events and updates from the Diversity and Inclusion Committee to the Vice Chair for inclusion in the newsletter (by the beginning of August and January).

g. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress as needed.

  1. Educational Chair

a. Attend monthly Student Congress meetings. If unable to attend a meeting, provide a written update to the Chair on the status of all current projects.

b. Organize committee(s) of Student Congress Officers and other students to help with Educational Activities, and serve as the chair of said committee(s). As chair, sponsor, arrange and plan activities/events focused on building community among educational opportunities for the student body. The following are the required events:

  1. Student Success Workshops (Science, Math and Writing workshops)
  2. Evolve Super User

Optional Events:

  1. Kaplan NCLEX Success free workshops
  2. Kaplan NCLEX Success Courses hosted at TCCNHS

c. May arrange more College wide events in addition to the above assignments based on the student’s needs and interested as it relates to education and educational success at the College.

d. Present ideas and detailed reports, including estimated budget, at monthly meetings in advance of any proposed activities/events.

e. Collaborate with the Faculty/Staff Advisors on the planning and implementation of proposed activities.

i. Faculty/Staff Advisor will complete the Purchase Approval Form (PAF) and submit to the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences for final approval and issuance of a check or for record of reimbursement of funds.

ii. Send the flyer to advertise the event to Faculty/Staff Advisor for approval and printing.

iii. Take the approved flyers and hang in appropriate places in the College, in alignment with the College’s policy on signage.

f. Provide information on planned events to the Vice Chair for inclusion in the newsletter (by the beginning of August and January).

g. Publicize planned events throughout the College building with flyers, signs, etc. in alignment with the College’s policy on signage.

h. Serve on special ad-hoc committees within Student Congress as needed.

Article IX. G. Meetings

Meetings will be held monthly and as deemed necessary. A meeting calendar will be completed by the Student Congress Officers no later than August for Fall semester meetings and November for Spring semester meetings. Meetings can be called by the Chair or by a Faculty/Staff Advisor and may be virtual (held via conference call or e-mail), if needed.

Article IX. H. Attendance and Voting

Meeting attendance for Officers is mandatory. If unable to attend a meeting, then a written update must be provided to the Chair in advance. An elected Officer of Student Congress who is unable to be present at three (3) meetings per academic year and fails to provide a written update for every absence is deemed to have resigned their office. A letter will be sent to the absent Officer outlining the details of forfeiting the position. This forfeiture letter will typically be sent by the Chair but may be sent by another Officer as appointed by the Faculty/Staff Advisors, if needed. If an Officer resigns, the Student Congress Officers and Advisory Board will elect a new student by majority vote to fill the unexpired term.

Meeting attendance for general student members is voluntary. All students, as general members of Student Congress, are invited to attend meetings. General student members are voting members of Student Congress and are invited to join the Officers in voting on matters brought before the Student Congress Board for approval.

Article IX. I. Faculty/Staff Advisors

At least two faculty members or one faculty member and one professional staff member will together serve as the Student Congress Faculty/Staff Advisors. Faculty/Staff Advisors are responsible for guiding, coaching, and providing support to the Student Congress throughout the academic year. The Faculty/Staff Advisors will:

  1. Organize and coordinate the annual nomination and voting process for new Officers.
  2. Collaborate with the Officers on all proposed Student Congress projects and business transactions, contact members of administration when necessary, and oversee the submission of all necessary paperwork for project completion.
  3. Attend Student Congress meetings as able.
  4. Approve, print and have stamped all flyers to be posted at the College.
  5. Oversee the financial budget and business of Student Congress, in collaboration with the entire Board and the Administrative Assistant, Arts & Sciences.
  6. Submit all PAFs to Sandy Haungs.
  7. Post all approved and signed meeting minutes to the College shared drive and provide a hard copy to Cheryl Boone.
  8. Post all Student Congress events on the Blackboard Institutional Calendar.
  9. Manage the ordering of all fundraising merchandise.
  10. Communicate to all list serves on behalf of Student Congress.
  11. Submit the summative yearly report to the Institutional Effectiveness Council.

Article IX. J. Amendments

This Student Congress constitution may be amended by majority vote of the Student Congress Officers.

Article IX. K. Student Congress Money Making Projects

All projects are subject to the discretion of the Faculty/Staff Advisors and the policies of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Creation of New Student Club and Organizations

Students are encouraged to initiate the creation of clubs and organizations that can help them develop the leadership skills that will benefit them in their professional endeavors and that can help create a culture of student engagement throughout the College.

All organizations that are created by students must:

 Be aligned with the vision, mission, and the core values of the College.

 All organizations that are created by students must adhere to the College’s non-discrimination policy as stated in the College Catalog.

 Adhere to the College rules and regulations as outlined in the College Catalog, individual program handbooks, and all other sources of policy within the College.

 Operate under the 501-c-3 status of the College, and shall not be separately incorporated.

 Identify at least one member of the faculty, administration, or staff to serve as the group’s moderator.

 If a chapter of a national or regional organization, the College club or organization must abide by the charter of said organization.

 Abide by the College’s policies concerning fund raising and financial management.

Procedure for Establishing a New College Club or Organization

Updated 10/17/15

  1. Students interested in establishing a new club or organization first should meet with the Dean of College Support Services to discuss their plans. The Dean of College Support Services will then provide the students with a Proposal for a New Student Organization (PNSO).
  2. Students must complete the PNSO and any requested documentation. If part of a national, international, regional, or professional organization, all requested documentation about those groups must be submitted.
  3. Students will submit the completed PNSO to the Dean of College Support Services within 90 days of receipt of the PNSO.
  4. The Dean of College Support Services will review the PNSO and consult with the College’s administration, if necessary.
  5. The Dean of College Support Services will make a decision about the creation of the new organization and will then communicate the decision to the students who presented the proposal.
  6. Upon approval, the student may begin to establish the new organization.

Procedures for Health Insurance, Background Checks, Drug Testing, and Student Health Screenings and Immunization Records

Health Insurance

Students enrolled in the College are required to carry health insurance and provide proof of current personal health insurance coverage to TCCNHS. A student may not participate in any course without meeting these requirements. Students who do not comply will not be allowed to enroll or continue enrollment at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Background Check Policy

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has secured the services of Corporate Screening, a straightforward, integrated, online process for managing and tracking results from the background check. The collection of this data is conducted by a third party to ensure privacy. Students have electronic access to their documents and the ability to provide access to the College of Nursing, practicum clinical agencies and to employers.

The results of prior background checks and drug tests that a student received for reasons unrelated to the College are not acceptable for purposes of these policies.

Background checks are to be initiated 90 days (3 months) prior to the beginning of the semester.

The purpose of this background check policy is to ensure that TCCNHS is preparing students who will be qualified to enter the nursing field. All new students entering the College must undergo a criminal background check as a condition of enrollment. All returning students must submit and satisfactorily complete an annual background check as a condition of continuing enrollment at the College. Clinical agencies may require additional background checks. Clinical agencies, in their sole discretion, have the authority to disallow a student from being placed at their site based on negative information in a background check. Not being placed, for whatever reason, will result in the student being unable to complete the clinical component of his/her program and, thus, unable to successfully complete his/her course of study at TCCNHS.

The Ohio Board of Nursing (OBN) is prohibited from issuing a nursing license to people who have pled guilty to, been convicted of, or have a judicial finding of guilt for one of the following offenses: aggravated murder, murder, voluntary manslaughter, felonious assault, kidnapping, rape, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, sexual battery, gross sexual imposition, aggravated arson, or a substantially similar law of another state. Therefore, a new student will have his/her conditional acceptance to TCCNHS automatically revoked if one of these crimes appears on a criminal background check. A continuing student will be automatically dismissed from TCCNHS if one of these crimes appears on a background check. Pending charges for one of these crimes will also result in revocation or dismissal.

OBN also has the authority to deny licensure to people who have pled guilty to, been convicted of, have a judicial finding of guilt of, have a judicial finding resulting from a plea of no contest to, or a judicial finding of eligibility for intervention in lieu of conviction for any of the following: (1) any felony (that is not an absolute bar as described in the previous paragraph); (2) a crime involving gross immortality or moral turpitude; (3) a misdemeanor drug law violation; or (4) a misdemeanor in the course of practice. As such, if a crime that falls into one of these four categories, or any other crimes or pending charges (excluding minor infractions or violations such as speeding, not wearing a seatbelt, fishing without a license), appear on a background check, a student may have his/her conditional acceptance revoked or be dismissed from the program. In these circumstances, the College will have discussions with the clinical placement sites that it has affiliation agreements with to determine if the student will be able to be placed at those locations notwithstanding the negative information on the background check. If no clinical agency agrees to accept the student for a clinical placement, the student will have his/her conditional acceptance revoked or will be dismissed from the College. In some situations, and prior to talking with the clinical placement sites, the College may also ask the student for more information regarding the situation that led to the negative information appearing on his/her background check.

If a student with negative information on a background check is allowed to enroll or continue his/her program of study at TCCNHS, he/she must understand that, despite being allowed to enroll or continue, the College cannot make any promises or guarantees regarding the student’s ability to obtain licensure from the OBN or employment in the nursing field post-graduation. College faculty and staff will not provide advice on a student’s ability to obtain licensure or employment notwithstanding an adverse background check, and students should not rely on any general information provided by College personnel in that regard. Students allowed to enroll or continue despite negative information on a background check will be required to sign an acknowledgement that they understand the information in this paragraph.

New students who are having their conditional acceptance revoked or current students who are being dismissed due to negative information on a background check will be notified of such in writing.

Current students have an ongoing duty to report to the College criminal convictions and pending charges that occur while they are enrolled but did not appear on the most recent background check that was performed. Such crimes or pending charges may result in non-placement and/or dismissal.

Drug Testing

Drug testing is required by the College for all students as a condition of enrollment. Failure to comply or achieve a satisfactory outcome will result in the student’s admission offer being rescinded, and attempts to re-apply to the College in the future will not be considered. Students may be drug tested any time due to “reasonable suspicion”. Circumstances which constitute reasonable suspicion include, but are not limited to, physiological signs of possible impairment from drugs or a pattern of abnormal behavior. Clinical agencies may require additional drug tests prior to beginning clinical.

Refusal to permit testing will be an automatic dismissal from the College. If the student fails a drug screen and cannot produce valid prescription documentation that is reviewed and confirmed by Employee Health, the student will be automatically dismissed from the College. Two (2) dilute drug tests will constitute a failed drug test. Students who are dismissed from the College due to a failed drug test will not be permitted to reapply to the College. Students will be notified in writing by the Associate Dean of Nursing of the failed drug test.

Student Health Screenings and Immunizations

All students who are accepted at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences are required to complete a health screening and provide documented immunity to specific diseases as listed below, prior to starting classes as a condition of enrollment. All students must be current and compliant with each health requirement at all times throughout their enrollment with the College.

The medical assessment will take place in the Employee Health / Disability Management Department, on the campus of The Christ Hospital, Medical Office Building (MOB), Suite 234.

The medical assessment includes:

  • Urine drug screen
  • Review immunization records or draw blood for MMR, Hepatitis B, and Varicella titers
  • Blood test for TB
  • Brief physical health examination
  • Vision screening
  • Flu vaccination (Required October – March, or provide documentation of flu vaccination)
  • Tdap vaccination

The College may be required to share a student’s information related to background checks, drug tests, health screenings, and immunizations with clinical agencies in order to place the student at that site for a clinical experience. The College can only discuss these matters with clinical agencies if the student provides written consent to disclose such information as required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Therefore, students will be required to complete and sign a consent form so that the College can discuss these results with a clinical agency. If a student refuses to sign this consent, the College will not be able to share the information with a clinical agency. Without confirmation that a student has successfully completed a background check and drug test and has necessary immunizations, it is very unlikely that the clinical agency will allow the student to be placed there. Not being placed, for whatever reason, will result in the student being unable to complete the clinical component of his/her program and, thus, unable to successfully complete his/her course of study at TCCNHS.

For protection of privacy, any hard copies of documents related to the above information will be kept in a file that is separate from a student’s normal educational file. This separate file will be kept in a locked file in the Associate Dean of Nursing’s office and will be retained for 5 years following the end of the student’s enrollment at TCCNHS. The records will then be destroyed in accordance with the College’s records and retention procedures.

There are no exceptions to the health insurance, background check, drug testing, health screening, and immunization requirements.

Drug and Alcohol Policies

Updated 9/28/15

The following outlines the College‘s policy regarding not only unlawful drug use, but also situations involving students who are under the influence and/or in possession of controlled substances, in accordance with the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989.

  1. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences seeks to provide an environment in which students may experience intellectual, emotional, physical, social, and personal growth. The development of the capacity to make informed decisions about drugs, including responsible choices about the consumption of alcohol, is a significant component of personal growth. The responsibility for making informed choices regarding drugs and the use of alcohol rests with everyone in the College.
  2. Drug and alcohol education supports all members of the College program to make informed and responsible decisions about drugs and alcohol. Education has two (2) primary components: first, to provide education for all students and personnel of the College community regarding the academic, social, legal, and health-related effects of drug and alcohol use and misuse; second, to provide access and referral for the assessment of and treatment for individuals with drug and alcohol-related problems. It is assumed that our commitment to providing education in addition to health counseling and ongoing support services will be matched by responsible behavior with respect to alcohol and other drugs.
  3. The college drug and alcohol policy applies to all faculty, staff, students, and student organizations who conduct activities on or off campus. Adhering to this policy is critical to the success The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences comprehensive drug and alcohol efforts and college mission statement.
  4. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences prohibits the illegal use, possession, sale, manufacture, or distribution of drugs and alcohol on the school’s property or as part of any of the school’s activities. In addition, the misuse of substances that present physical or psychological hazards to individuals is prohibited.
  5. Alcohol use and illegal drug use is prohibited on the campus of TCCNHS. This includes the use of prescription drugs for purposes other than prescribed, and use of prescription drugs prescribed for someone else.
  6. It is at the discretion of the Board of Nursing in each state to determine if a student’s history of using drugs or alcohol will prohibit them from obtaining a nursing license.
  7. If a student is found in violation of these Drug and Alcohol Policies, sanctions will be determined by college administration. These could include but are not limited to: written warning, parental notification, educational sanction (a required activity that engages the student in a positive learning experience), limitations on activities, restitution, probation, suspension, or dismissal from the College.
  8. Please see The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences Department of Nursing Program Handbook for policies related to drug and alcohol use in the clinical setting under the Student Conduct While Providing Nursing Care Policy.

Chemical Dependency Policy

Chemical dependency is recognized as a disease for which there is effective treatment and rehabilitation. It is defined as a disease in which a person‘s consumption of any mood-altering chemical that definitively and repeatedly interferes with that individual‘s health and/or job performance. Students who suspect that they may have a chemical dependency problem, even in its early stages, are encouraged to seek diagnosis and to follow through with the treatment that may be prescribed by qualified professionals in order to arrest the disease as soon as possible.

  1. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences conducts pre-entry drug screenings for all matriculated students.
  2. The decision to request diagnosis and accept treatment for chemical dependency is the personal responsibility of the individual.
  3. A student refusing to accept referral for diagnosis or to follow prescribed treatment may be referred to administrative personnel for disposition in accordance with the College‘s Code of Conduct.
  4. It is at the discretion of the Board of Nursing in each state to determine whether or not a student’s history of chemical dependency will prohibit their ability to obtain a nursing license.

Health Risks Associated with Chemical Dependency

 All drugs and alcohol can have side effects. Their influences can affect the safety and wellbeing of the users as well as those around them.

 Illicit drugs can interfere with important brain activities including but not limited to coordination, memory and learning. They can also increase the risk of lung cancer, destroy liver cells, initiate severe weight loss and in some cases weaken the immune system. Users may also experience abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, rapid heartbeat irregular breathing, convulsions, and coma. Combining drugs can be fatal.

 Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant that is absorbed into the blood stream and transmitted to all parts of the body. Moderate doses reduce physical coordination and mental alertness while larger doses of alcohol drastically impair an individual’s ability to function, sometimes rendering them unconscious. Long term drinking can increase the risk of developing liver and heart disease, circulatory and stomach problems, various forms of cancer and causes irreversible brain damage.

 For more information about the health risks associated with chemical dependency please see www.drugabuse.gov

Rehabilitation Resources for Students with Chemical Dependency

 IMPACT Student Assistance Program—1-866-780-0855.

 Center for Chemical Addictions Treatment- www.ccatsober.org

o 24 Hour Detoxification Services: CCAT’s detoxification program offers 24 hour nursing care, with a staff that is sensitive to your individual withdrawal symptoms and needs. The average stay for 24 Hour Detoxification is 3-5 days.

o Suboxone- Medication to assist in opiate addiction treatment and withdrawal.

o Short-term Residential Treatment- Focus on Recovery: CCAT’s Short-Term Residential Treatment Program provides individual attention and education to help you focus on recovery. CCAT’s trained professionals will educate you on the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, relapse prevention, HIV/AIDS education, stress management and other areas touched by chemical dependency. Other sessions include art and recreation, morning meditation, spirituality discussions, and more. Based on your needs and progress, a stay generally averages 28 days.

o Strengthening Families Program: CCAT works to rebuild families affected by addiction in this program. Families will learn how to best support their loved one on his/her path to sobriety. After each group meeting, time is set aside for families to visit with their loved one and begin the rebuilding process.

 Alcoholics Anonymous Cincinnati- www.aacincinnati.org

o Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem. It is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about his or her drinking problem.

o AA membership features person-to-person (“sponsorship) mentoring and education for anyone seeking help with an alcohol addiction, a 12-step program, and group meetings.

 Alcoholism Council of the Cincinnati Area (NCADD)- www.alcoholismcouncil.org

o The Recovery Health Access Center (RHAC): RHAC provides information and services including prevention programs, clinical assessments, and treatment referrals to Hamilton County (Ohio) residents. Trained professionals conduct a detailed screening for alcohol and drug use problems, and, when needed, make an appropriate referral within the Hamilton County Alcohol/Drug Addiction Services network. Clinicians also offer full chemical dependency assessments that are designed to identify the most appropriate care.

 Talbert House- www.talberthouse.org

o Adult Behavioral Health: Mental health and substance abuse assessment and treatment programs for adults throughout Greater Cincinnati and surrounding counties. Behavioral health professionals focus on the success of each individual through prevention, case management, and outpatient treatment.

o Youth Behavioral Health: Mental health and substance abuse services include prevention, case management, outpatient treatment and wraparound delivered in the community, schools and residential facilities

o Housing: The housing service line assists transitional youth, adults and families who need housing and other support services in scattered sites and designated apartment buildings throughout the community. Talbert House offers permanent supportive housing, transitional housing and rent vouchers/subsidies. To determine if you are eligible and/or space is available, contact 513-221-HELP (4357)

Legal Sanctions Related to Drugs and Alcohol

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences supports the full enforcement of federal, state, and local legal sanctions described in the following pages.

Federal Law

 Federal law prohibits, among other things, the manufacturing, distributing, selling and possession of controlled substances as outlined in 21 United States Code, Sections 801 through 971. Depending on the amount, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking marijuana range from up to five years’ imprisonment and a fine of up to $250,000 to imprisonment for life and a fine of $4 million. Depending on the amount, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking other controlled substances (e.g., methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, cocaine base, PCP, LSD, fentanyl and fentanyl analogue) range from five years to life imprisonment and fines range from $2 to $4 million. First offense penalties and sanctions for the illegal possession of small amounts of controlled substances, including marijuana, range from up to one year in prison or a fine of at least $1,000. Penalties are more severe for subsequent offenses.

 Convictions for federal drug offenses can also result in the loss of eligibility for federal financial aid.

State Law, Alcohol

 Ohio Revised Code (“O.R.C.”) Section 4301.63 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall purchase beer or intoxicating liquor. The penalty for a violation may include a fine of not less than $25, but no more than $100 may be imposed. The court may order that the fine be paid by the performance of public work at a reasonable hourly rate established by the court and shall designate the time within which the public work shall be completed.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.631 provides that no underage person can purchase low alcohol beverages, that no person may furnish low alcohol beverages to an underage person, and that no person shall allow underage persons to consume low alcohol beverages on his or her property. Punishments for violating O.R.C. Section 4301.631 range from fines of $25 to $250 and imprisonment up to 30 days.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.633 provides that no person shall knowingly furnish any false information as to the name, age, or other identification of any person under 21 years of age for the purpose of obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor for a person under 21 years of age, by purchase or as a gift. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a$1,000 fine.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.634 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall knowingly show or give false information concerning his name, age, or other identification for the purpose of purchasing or otherwise obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor in any place in this state where beer or intoxicating liquor is sold under a permit issued by the department of liquor control. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a$1,000 fine.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.64 prohibits the consumption of any beer or intoxicating liquor in a motor vehicle. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 30 days and a $250 fine.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.69(A) prohibits selling beer or intoxicating liquor to a person under the age of 21 years, or buying it for or furnishing it to such a person. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a fine of not less than $500 and no more than $1,000.

 O.R.C. Section 4301.69(E) provides that no underage person shall knowingly possess or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor, in any public or private place, unless he is accompanied by a parent, spouse, or legal guardian, who is not an underage person, or unless the beer or intoxicating liquor is given for medical or religious purposes. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,000 fine.

 O.R.C. Section 4511.19 prohibits any person from driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or any drug of abuse. Violation of this law is a misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,075 fine, in addition to license suspension and attendance satisfactory completion of a treatment or education program. Penalties for repeat offenders can result in up to 5 years in prison and an increase in fines.

State Law, Drugs

 O.R.C. Section 2925.03 provides that no person shall knowingly “traffic” in controlled or illicit substances, including marijuana. Trafficking includes selling, offering to sell, delivering, distributing, preparing, cultivating, and manufacturing of controlled substances. The penalty is mandatory fines ranging from $100 to $20,000, depending on offense and drug involved, and mandatory jail sentences ranging from 6 months to 10 years.

 O.R.C. Section 2925.11 provides that no person shall knowingly obtain, possess, or use a controlled substance. Drug abuse offenses involving amounts of marijuana less than 100 grams carries a penalty of not more than $150. Possessing larger amounts of marijuana will result in more severe penalties up to a mandatory jail term of not more than 8 years and a fine of up to $15,000. Drug abuse offenses involving other drugs may result in jail terms of up to 11 years and fines of $20,000.

 O.R.C. Section 2925.12 provides that no person shall make obtain, possess, or use drug abuse instruments. A first offense can carry a jail term of up to 90 days and fines of $750, plus driver’s license suspension for a period of six months to five years.

 O.R.C. Section 2925.14 provides that no person shall knowingly use, possess with purpose to use, sell, manufacture or advertise drug paraphernalia. Depending upon the facts, the penalty is imprisonment up to 6 months and fines up to $1,000.

 O.R.C. Section 2925.31 provides, except for lawful research, clinical, medical, dental, or veterinary purposes, no person with intent to induce intoxication or similar effect, shall obtain, possess, or use a harmful intoxicant. The penalty is fines up to $1,000 and 6 months in jail, plus driver’s license suspension for a period of six months to five years.

 O.R.C. Section 2925.37 provides that no person shall knowingly possess, make, sell, or deliver counterfeit controlled substances. Depending upon the facts, the penalty can be up to 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine, and result in a driver’s license suspension for a period of six months to five years. Aggravating circumstances can also cause the offense to become a felony of the fourth degree with prison terms between 6-18 months and a fine up to $5,000.

Local Law

 The City of Cincinnati enforces all the state criminal statutes cited above. In addition, Cincinnati lists some additional sanctions for alcohol and other drug use, including without limitation, prohibitions against: driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs; possession and consumption of alcohol while underage; providing alcohol to underage persons; having an open container of alcohol in public places; possession of a controlled substance; purchasing and consuming low-alcohol beverages by underage persons; using false representations by underage persons to obtain alcohol; permitting the consumption of alcohol by underage persons at a person’s property (including hotel rooms); and hosting a party where alcohol or drug abuse occurs. Penalties for violation of these local laws include fines not to exceed $1,000 (plus court costs) and imprisonment for up to six months.

Students Convicted of Possession or Sale of Drugs

A federal or state drug conviction (but not a local or municipal conviction) can disqualify a student for Federal Student Aid (FSA) funds. The student self-certifies in applying for aid that s/he is eligible; the institution is not required to confirm the reported information unless it has conflicting information.

Convictions only count against a student for aid eligibility purposes (FAFSA question 23c) if they were for an offense that occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid—they do not count if the offense was not during such a period, unless the student was denied federal benefits for drug trafficking by a federal or state judge (see drug abuse hold sidebar). Also, a conviction that was reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record does not count, nor does one received when she was a juvenile, unless she was tried as an adult.

The chart below illustrates the period of ineligibility for FSA funds, depending on whether the conviction was for sale or possession and whether the student had previous offenses. (A conviction for sale of drugs includes convictions for conspiring to sell drugs.)

Possession of Illegal Drugs

Sale of Illegal Drugs

1st Offense

1 year from date of conviction

2 years from date of conviction

2nd Offense

2 years from date of conviction

Indefinite period

3rd Offense

Indefinite Period

Indefinite Period

If the student was convicted of both possessing and selling illegal drugs, and the periods of ineligibility are different, the student will be ineligible for the longer period. Schools must provide each student who becomes ineligible for FSA funds due to a drug conviction a clear and conspicuous written notice of his loss of eligibility and the methods whereby he can become eligible again.

A student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends (i.e., for a 1st or 2nd offense); or when he or she successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program that includes passing two unannounced drug tests given by such a program. Further drug convictions will make him ineligible again.

Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain eligibility after completing any of the following 3 options:

  1. Successfully completing a rehabilitation program, as described below, which includes passing two unannounced drug tests from such a program);
  2. Having the conviction reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record; or
  3. Successfully completing two unannounced drug tests which are part of a rehab program (the student does not need to complete the rest of the program).

In such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains eligibility. It is the student’s responsibility to certify that s/he has successfully completed the rehabilitation program; as with the conviction question on the FAFSA, the institution is not required to confirm the reported information unless it has conflicting information.

When a student regains eligibility during the award year, the institution may award Pell Grant, TEACH, and Campus-Based aid for the current payment period and Direct Loans for the period of enrollment.

Standards for a Qualified Drug Rehabilitation Program:

A qualified drug rehabilitation program must include at least two unannounced drug tests and satisfy at least one of the following requirements:

 Be qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly from a federal, state, or local government program.

 Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state-licensed insurance company.

 Be administered or recognized by a federal, state, or local government agency or court.

 Be administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic, or medical doctor.

If the institution is counseling a student who will need to enter such a program, the institution may advise the student of these requirements. If a student certifies that he has successfully completed a drug rehabilitation program, but the institution has reason to believe that the program does not meet the requirements, the institution must find out if it does before paying the student any FSA funds.

Tobacco Policy

The Christ Hospital and The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences prohibit the use of tobacco products (including electronic cigarettes) on its campuses, in its facilities and vehicles.

Patients, visitors, employees, physicians, students, volunteers, vendors, and contractors may not smoke or use tobacco products (including electronic cigarettes) on the grounds of The Christ Hospital Health Network facilities. This includes all vehicles in parking areas and hospital vehicles off the property. The Christ Hospital also discourages the use of tobacco products (including electronic cigarettes) by employees or visitors on properties adjacent to hospital properties, to show respect for our neighbors. The administration of the College requests that students refrain from smoking at the foot of driveways and walls in the surrounding vicinity of the College on Auburn Avenue, as well as smoking near signage for The Christ Hospital or College.

Student Travel Policy

Updated 1/19/16; Updated 11/15/16; 12/11/17

TCCNHS believes that College-sponsored off campus events involving student transportation and travel (“trips”) are a valuable part of a student’s learning experience. However, these trips raise particular issues and safety concerns, and this policy has been developed to address these concerns. This policy applies to following types of College-sanctioned or funded trips:

 Curriculum-based/academic trips, including field trips;

 Trips sponsored by student organizations;

 Service trips; and

 Other College-sponsored trips involving student transportation.

For purposes of this policy, “Trip Sponsor” means the faculty member, staff member, or student organization leader responsible for organizing the trip, obtaining approval for the trip, and supervising the trip. Other faculty/staff members may assist the Trip Sponsor in carrying out his or her duties.

This policy does not apply to students driving to outside agencies for clinical experiences. Students alone are responsible for this type of transportation. Additionally, this policy does not apply to minor or impromptu activities in the nearby area that may involve student transportation (such as a faculty member and small student group traveling to the local library), nor does it apply to any type of personal travel to and from the College or unrelated to the College.

Prior to the Trip

Trip Approval

All trips governed by this policy must be pre-approved by the Dean of College Support Services using the Student Trip Approval Form. The Trip Sponsor should complete the Student Trip Approval Form in its entirety and file it at least three (3) weeks in advance of the trip with the Dean of College Support Services. .

The Student Trip Approval Form may be used for one-time trips or for recurring trips throughout a semester.

If a trip involves expenses that the Trip Sponsor considers reimbursable by the College, these expenses must be described in an attachment to the Student Trip Approval Form.

Trips are approved on the basis of some or all of the following factors: distance, travel time, destination, nature of trip, faculty/staff presence, budgetary concerns, and completion of appropriate forms.

Transporting Students

Faculty/Staff Transporting Students

All faculty/staff that provide student transportation on a trip governed by this policy must be authorized by the College to do so. All faculty/staff who anticipate that they may be providing such transportation are encouraged to become authorized drivers at the beginning of the semester, or soon after hire.

Faculty/staff must submit a current driver’s license and proof of insurance to the Dean of College Support Services, which will request a Driver Record check on the information provided. Please allow for processing and review time of approximately three (3) weeks. The College retains discretion as to whether to grant authorization to transport students. If the Driver Record check clears and authorization is granted, the Dean of College Support Services and the faculty/staff member should sign the Faculty/Staff Authorization to Transport Students Form.

Faculty/Staff driving authorizations are valid for the duration of employment with TCCNHS unless a violation occurs. Licensure violations must be self-reported to the Dean of College Support Services, within three (3) days of the violation. Driving authorizations are subject to revocation at the College’s discretion, and failure to self-report violations can result in disciplinary action. The College reserves the right to require additional license checks and Driver Record checks.

Completed and signed Faculty/Staff Authorization to Transport Students Forms will be maintained by the Dean of College Support Services until the faculty/staff member is no longer employed.

Student Transportation

Student Self-Transportation

In some circumstances, students may be transporting themselves on a trip governed by this policy. In the event a student travels in any personally owned vehicle or via public transportation for such a trip, the student must complete a Student Self-Transportation Agreement and submit it to the Trip Sponsor prior to the trip. This applies to trips for which the student chooses not to use the College-provided transportation as well as trips for which the College does not provide transportation. The Student Self-Transportation Agreement may be used for one-time trips or for frequent trips throughout a given semester.

In the event a student is involved in an accident in his/her personal vehicle while transporting himself/herself on a trip governed by this policy, the student is responsible for loss or damage to the vehicle and any bodily injury or property or other liability, and is expected to maintain appropriate insurance covering damage, liability and medical costs.

Authorized Student Drivers

On some trips governed by this policy, students may be driving other students. TCCNHS permits student drivers to transport other students on these trips only after a student obtains authorization as indicated below.

To become an authorized driver a student should initiate the following application process at least three (3) weeks prior to the trip.

 Complete the Student Driver Authorization Form and turn it in to the Dean of College Support Services.

 Submit a current driver’s license and proof of insurance to the Dean of College Support Services for copying.

 For insurance purposes, the College will obtain a Driver Record check.

The College maintains discretion as to whether to grant approval. If approved, student driving authorizations are valid for the duration of enrollment at TCCNHS unless a violation occurs. Licensure violations must be self-reported to the Dean of College Support Services within three (3) days of the violation. Driving authorizations are subject to revocation at the College’s discretion, and failure to self-report violations can result in disciplinary action. The College reserves the right to require additional license checks and Driver Record checks.

Completed and signed Student Driver Authorization Forms should be maintained by the Dean of College Support Services until the student is no longer enrolled.

Safe and Legal Operation of Vehicles

The following guidelines apply to authorized drivers while on a trip governed by this policy:

 Drivers must ensure that they have a valid license to drive.

 Under no circumstance will drivers be reimbursed by the College for fines incurred for moving or parking violations.

 Under no circumstance will drivers operate a vehicle on trips governed by this policy under the influence of alcohol or other controlled substances.

 Drivers must ensure that they are properly insured when operating vehicles.

 Personal side trips are not permitted.

 In the event of an accident, regardless of the amount of damage or injury, drivers must contact local law enforcement authorities and an accident report must be obtained. Drivers must notify the Dean of College Support Services as soon as possible.

Required Forms

All students participating in a trip governed by this policy must complete an Emergency Contact and Medical Form, sign a Release Form, and give both to the Trip Sponsor prior to the trip. For any student under the age of 18, parent/guardian signature(s) will also be required.

Prior to departure, the Trip Sponsor should provide the Dean of College Support Services with a copy of the approved Student Trip Approval Form, completed Emergency Contact and Medical Forms, and the signed Release Forms. The Trip Sponsor should keep a copy of the same documents for the duration of the trip.

Other Pre-Trip Considerations

The following issues must be considered prior to a trip governed by this policy:

 Trip Sponsors must meet with those students traveling to discuss the planned itinerary, behavioral expectations, and transportation details. It should be communicated to students that the College does not provide medical insurance for any student’s participation in the trips and that students will be responsible for any medical costs they incur during and/or as a result of the trip.

 Students will be held to the standards of conduct found in the College Catalog and all other College policies while participating in trips governed by this policy and may be disciplined accordingly.

 Students who do not turn in the proper forms, or meet other pre-requisites for a trip, shall not be permitted to go on the trip.

 If the trip includes overnight accommodations, students of the same gender should room together, and faculty/staff members will not room with students.

 College administrators may cancel trips governed by this policy for any reason it deems necessary, including, but not limited to, inclement weather conditions, travel advisories, emergencies, budgetary concerns, etc.

 Except with the permission of the Dean of College Support Services obtained in advance, no one other than College students and faculty/staff may participate in trips governed by this policy.

During the Trip

Emergencies and Incident Reporting

This section contains guidelines to follow in case an incident or emergency occurs on a trip. Reactions to incidents and emergencies will and do vary depending upon the circumstances. Trip Sponsors and other faculty/staff members should use their judgment of how to best handle an incident or emergency situation. In addition to these guidelines, Trip Sponsors may want to develop, and communicate to students, trip-specific safety precautions as appropriate.

If someone on the trip requires medical attention:

 Taking into consideration the extent of the injury or illness, make certain that the student or faculty/staff receives the required medical attention.

 For injuries or illnesses that are more than minor in nature, report the situation to the Dean of College Support Services.

 For injuries or illnesses that are more than minor in nature, complete a Student Trip Incident Report Form and turn into the Dean of College Support Services as soon as reasonably possible.

If a student egregiously violates College policy (as determined by the Trip Sponsor and/or other faculty/staff member in attendance) or is arrested:

 Report the incident to the Dean of College Support Services.

 Complete a Student Trip Incident Report Form and turn into the Dean of College Support Services as soon as reasonably possible.

Other serious incidents, where, at the very least, the situation should be reported to the Dean of College Support Services. The report should be shared with the Associate Dean of Compliance, as needed, for inclusion in the College’s Annual Security Report. A Student Trip Incident Report Form should be completed and turned in as soon as reasonably possible, include:

 Crimes committed by or against someone on the trip

 Recurring alcohol abuse

 Someone on the trip goes missing

 Natural disasters affecting those on the trip

 Any incident requiring an emergency medical response or involvement of law enforcement

 Any incident involving a significant violation of College policy

 Any incident could require the use of significant College resources to address or resolve

 Any other crises involving the immediate well-being of those on the trip

Other Trip Considerations

The following issues should also be considered during a trip governed by this policy:

 If there will be expenses approved for reimbursement by the College, Trip Sponsors are responsible for obtaining and keeping all necessary invoices, receipts, etc. throughout the trip.

 Student must attend all scheduled events and activities. Permission to leave the group or not attend a scheduled event or activity must be received from the Trip Sponsor.

 Students are responsible to arrive on time at all scheduled activities and events as indicated by the Trip Sponsor and/or on a distributed itinerary.

 The Trip Sponsor, faculty/staff, and students are responsible for all expenses they personally incur outside that authorized by the College as a reimbursable expense.

 Travelers will be held financially responsible for any damages, liability or losses to personal property that result from their misconduct (e.g., damages to hotel rooms, theft of hotel linen, etc.).

 If the overnight accommodations are for more than one night or recurrent (i.e. year after year at the same hotel, even if for one night each time), faculty/staff, and students will provide the following specific information to the Dean of College Support Services by the Trip Sponsor/Trip Leader: the room number(s), floor number(s), possible access areas (hallways, stairs, elevators, lobby, parking lot) and specific dates and times of use. The Dean will provide completed document(s) to the Associate Dean of Compliance for use in retrieving information for required non-campus property crime reporting. Information must be submitted on the Student Travel Non-Campus Property Form.

Documents

The following documents should be maintained by the Trip Sponsor and the Dean of College Support Services during the trip:

 The approved Student Trip Approval Form

 Signed student Release Forms

 Signed Student Self-Transportation Agreements, if any

 Student Emergency Contact and Medical Forms

 This Student Travel Policy

 Student Travel Non-Campus Property Form.

Following the Trip

Reimbursement of Expenses

Those seeking reimbursement for approved trip expenses should confer with the Dean of College Support Services.

Retention of Documents

The following documents should be maintained by the Dean of College Support Services for three (3) years after completion of the trip:

 The approved Student Trip Approval Form

 Signed student Release Forms

 Signed Student Self-Transportation Agreements, if any

 Completed Student Trip Incident Report Forms, if any

Service Animal Policy

It is the policy of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences that service animals assisting individuals with disabilities are welcomed and generally permitted in all facilities and on all campuses with the exceptions described below.

The American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its amendments define a service animal as a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. Beginning on March 15, 2011, only dogs are recognized as service animals under Titles II and III of the ADA. There is a provision regarding miniature horses as services animals, meeting specific assessment factors.

There are instances when a service animal may be restricted. With regards to the college, there may be possible restrictions of service animals in nursing and health sciences programs, food services programs, or laboratories that can pose a safety risk. These exceptions would need to be considered individually to determine whether the dog poses a possible danger and if other reasonable accommodations can be provided.

Overall, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure the safety and control of the animal. While legal access rights are afforded to users of assistance animals, with that comes the responsibility of ensuring the animal behaves and responds appropriately at all times in public and adheres to the same socially acceptable standards as any individual in the community.

Types of Service Dogs (Animals):

 Guide dog – A carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool by persons who are blind or have severe visual impairment.

 Hearing dog – A dog who has been trained to alert a person with significant hearing loss or who is deaf when a sound (e.g., knock on the door) occurs.

 Service dog – service dog is a dog that has been trained to assist a person who has a mobility or health impairment. Types of duties the dog may perform include carrying, fetching, opening doors, ringing doorbells, activation elevator buttons, steadying a person while walking, helping a person up after the person falls, etc.

 Sig dog – A dog trained to assist a person with autism. The dog alerts the partner to distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism that may have problems with sensory input and needs the same support services from a dog that a dog might give to a person who is blind or deaf.

 Seizure respond dog – A dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder; how the dog serves the person depends on the person’s needs. The dog may stand guard over the person during a seizure, or the dog may go for help. A few dogs have somehow learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance.

 Therapy and Companion Animals are not generally covered under the ADA. However, if the animal is specifically trained to perform tasks of the owner, the requests will be evaluated on a case by case basis.

Documentation Requirements

The owner of the service animal will be required to meet with the Director of Student Success. Requests are handled through the regular accommodation process. The following information is required for documentation purposes:

 Health records – The animal must have a health statement, including vaccinations from a licensed veterinarian dated within the past year. Generally, legitimate assistance animals are well groomed and receive excellent veterinary care, including an annual checkup. A veterinarian’s statement within the past 12 to 15 months as to good health is necessary. Preventative measures should be taken at all times for flea and odor control.

 Minimum training standards – Verification that the animal has been individually trained to provide the service/assistance to meet the needs of the student/handler.

 Identification – It is recommended that the animal wear some type of commonly recognized identification symbol, identifying the animal as a working animal, but not disclosing disability.

Control Requirements

 The animal should be on a leash when not providing a needed service to handler.

 The animal should respond to voice commands at all times, and the handler should be in full control of the animal.

 To the extent possible, the animal should be as unobtrusive to other students and the learning environment as possible.

Consequences for Behavior – When a service animal is determined out of control as reported by students, staff, or administration, the infraction will be treated on an individual basis. If the animal poses a threat to the safety of other students, Christ Hospital Safety and Security will be part of the collaboration team to determine the outcome of the behavior. Consequences may include but not be limited to muzzling a barking animal, refresher training for both the animal and the owner, or exclusion from college facilities. If the service animal is excluded from the college, this does not apply to the owner who is welcome to continue at the college without the service animal.

Pubic Etiquette by Services Animals

To the extent possible, the animal should not:

 Sniff people or the personal belongings of others.

 Display any behaviors or noises that are disruptive to others unless art of the service being provided to the owner.

 Engage in personal grooming in public settings.

 Block an aisle or passageway for fire egress.

Public Etiquette to Student with Animal

General public should avoid:

 Petting a service animal as it may distract them from the task at hand.

 Feeding the service animal.

 Deliberately startling a service animal.

 Separating or attempting to separate an owner/handler from his/her service animal.

 Hesitating to ask a student if she/he would like assistance if there seems to be confusion.

Conflicting Disabilities

It is common for a person to have a disability the precipitates an allergic reaction to animals. Persons making an asthmatic/allergy/medical complaint are directed to the Student Success Department. The person making the complaint must show medicinal documentation to support the problem as efficiently and expeditiously as possible. In the event the situation cannot be resolved, the Associate Dean, Compliance/Chief Disability Officer will assist within the grievance procedure.

Leave of Absence

Updated 1/11/16

Leave of absence (LOA) is defined as an absence from the College for a period not exceeding one year from the beginning of the last semester in which the student was enrolled. (Notes: For leaves not exceeding one semester, either fall or spring, please see the Non-Continuous Enrollment policy. Leaves of Absence associated with active duty in the US Armed Forces are addressed by a separate policy, below—Military Leave of Absence.)

Criteria

To be eligible for a Leave of Absence, a student must meet the following criteria:

a. Be a degree-seeking matriculated student having completed one semester at the College.

b. Be in good academic standing, as defined in the College Catalog, and passing all courses in which you are currently enrolled at the time of the leave. Students on academic probation do not qualify.

c. Be in good financial standing with the College. Students on financial hold do not qualify.

Process for Obtaining an LOA:

  1. Review the LOA policy.
  2. Obtain an LOA Form from the Registrar’s Office.
  3. Schedule an appointment with the following persons to obtain the signatures required by the LOA Form:

a. Academic Advisor

b. Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, or designee

c. Bursar, or designee

d. Program Director, where applicable.

  1. Make an appointment to meet with the Dean of College Support Services.

a. When meeting with the Dean, the student will submit the completed LOA Form and discuss the next steps to be taken (including what supporting documentation will need to be submitted).

Types of LOA:

 Compassionate Leave: A student who has experienced a *catastrophic event that significantly impairs completion of a course of study will qualify for a Compassionate LOA. (*A catastrophic event may be defined as a one-time extenuating occurrence such as a serious illness or injury that requires medical care, or the death of an immediate family member.)

 Medical Leave: A student who must interrupt enrollment temporarily because of physical or psychological illness may request a Medical Leave of Absence from the Dean of College Support Services. The medical or mental health professional who has been providing treatment to the student will, with the student’s written consent, confirm in writing that a Medical Leave is warranted due to the student’s health problem. Students must meet the above Leave of Absence criteria and follow the Process for Obtaining a Leave of Absence outlined above. Supporting medical documentation must be dated within 30 days of the request for a Medical Leave of Absence.

If LOA is Approved:

 The student will be notified in writing by the Dean of College Support Services.

 The student should report to the Registrar’s Office to drop his/her classes (where applicable) and turn in his/her identification badge and parking card.

 All student privileges will be suspended (with the exception of Impact Student Life Assistance), to be reinstated upon the student’s return.

 Courses taken at other institutions during the student’s LOA will not be considered for transfer credit.

 The appropriate administrative personnel may administratively withdraw the student from his/her coursework, where appropriate. The student will receive a “WA” for Withdrawal Administrative on his/her transcript. The student must then repeat the course.

 The student should refer to the appropriate program handbook to know and understand what will be expected of him/her upon return from LOA.

 The student must plan to meet with his/her Academic Advisor eight (8) weeks prior to the date of his/her return.

If LOA is Not Approved:

 The student will be notified in writing by the Dean of College Support Services.

 The student should refer to the College Catalog policy on Withdrawals.

Eight (8) Weeks Prior to Returning from LOA:

  1. The student must meet with their Academic Advisor to:

a. Review the revised education plan, degree audit and receive a release to register for classes.

b. Verify that all College and program requirements are satisfied, for example: proof of insurance, health records, background checks, etc.

  1. The student must communicate with the Registrar to register for classes, as available. (Placement of the returning student will be evaluated by the appropriate administrative personnel. The Registrar will notify the appropriate personnel of the change in student status.)

Failure to Return from LOA:

 Students will receive written notification of an Administrative Withdrawal from the College. This notification will come from the Dean of College Support Services.

 Students who desire to return to the College after the Leave of Absence has expired must reapply for admission.

Military Leave of Absence

Any student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States and is called to active duty will be granted a Military Leave of Absence for the period of active duty and one year thereafter.

 Requests must be accompanied by a copy of military orders indicating the induction date.

 Upon return from a Military Leave of Absence, the student will be restored to the educational status attained prior to being called to duty without loss of academic credits earned, scholarships or grants awarded, or tuition or other fees paid prior to the commencement of active duty.

 Students requiring a Military Leave of Absence should contact the Associate Dean of the program in which they are enrolled for additional information.

 For additional information regarding Veterans’ benefits, contact the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid.

Pregnant and Parenting Student Policy

Added 3/13/2017

A student who foresees any educational issues related to a pregnancy or due to parenting responsibilities is strongly encouraged to notify the College as soon as possible. By doing so, the student and College personnel can collaborate and develop an appropriate plan for the continuation of the student’s education in light of the unique nature of the College’s nursing and health sciences programs and their clinical requirements. Pre-planning can also help with particular challenges a student may face while pregnant, when recovering from childbirth, or due to parenting obligations (e.g., missed classes, make-up work, etc.). Please note, however, that the choice to inform the College of a pregnancy is voluntary, and a student is not required to share this information with the College.

To support the College’s commitment to student success, the College clarifies the options students have when anticipating educational issues related to a pregnancy or due to parenting responsibilities.

If a student voluntarily decides to disclose a pregnancy to the College or is concerned that parenting responsibilities may have an impact on class attendance or other educational obligations, the student should contact the Chief Compliance Officer. Once contact has been made, the student will have several options, as described below.

  1. Continue at the College and Seek Reasonable Adjustments to Educational Obligations

 If a student decides to continue in his/her program and desires to have any adjustments to his/her academic program due to pregnancy or parenting responsibilities, the student through the Chief Compliance Officer will discuss any reasonable adjustments that may be implemented with professors, and other needed personnel (program director, academic advisor, etc.). The Chief Compliance Officer may also consult with other College personnel in determining what, if any, reasonable adjustments are available. Also, while the student is able to and encouraged to ask for specific adjustments that are believed to be necessary, the College reserves the right to deny specific requests that it determines are not reasonable in light of the College’s programs and the particular circumstances raised by the student’s situation.

 Adjustments that have been agreed upon, if any, will be documented and signed by both the student and the Chief Compliance Officer.

 The following expectations apply to students who are absent due to pregnancy and related issues:

 A student will need to provide specific documentation on office letterhead from the student’s healthcare provider, including the presence or absence of restrictions, dates of absence, and release to return to classes after hospitalization due to pregnancy and related issues.

 Students must communicate any unexpected delays in returning to school to the Chief Compliance Officer or other key personnel (program director, academic advisor, etc.) so that possible additional reasonable adjustments can be considered.

  1. Request a Leave of Absence

 A student may desire to take a leave of absence due to pregnancy or parenting responsibilities, and the Chief Compliance Officer is available to discuss this option with the student.

 A leave of absence due to pregnancy or parenting responsibilities may be for various amounts of time depending on a student’s particular circumstances. A leave based on pregnancy may be extended if deemed medically necessary by the student’s doctor.

 Due to the structure of the College’s health sciences programs, the timing and/or length of a student’s leave of absence may result in the student being required to re-take or finish course(s) in a future term.

 If taking a leave of absence under this policy, an Education Plan will be discussed and signed by the student and the Chief Compliance Officer or Dean of College Support Services.

  1. Withdraw from the College

 The student may, in his/her sole discretion, determine that he/she must withdraw from the College for an indefinite period of time or permanently due to pregnancy or parenting responsibilities. Normal College withdrawal procedures, and readmission procedures (if applicable), apply.

Policy Exceptions

The Dean/President may grant policy exceptions based on unusual facts or circumstances. Exceptions must not violate federal, state or local laws or regulations, including governmental rules. In evaluating a request for an exception, the Dean/President will meet the following standards:

 If there is any question as to whether the exception may implicate federal, state or local laws or regulations, the President and General Counsel must be consulted before the exception is granted.

 Should the facts and circumstances indicate a recurring issue, the Dean/President should consider revising the policy.

 Exceptions to the policies must be documented and maintained by the department making the decision. Policy exception documentation should be maintained for 5 years after the decision is made.

OperationsLast updated: February 11, 2019

The Division of Operations provides leadership, supervision, and budget oversight for the operational needs of the institution (i.e. building maintenance, space and facilities, safety and security, parking, etc.). The division includes the departments of Institutional Compliance and Effectiveness and Constituent Relations.

The purpose of Institutional Compliance and Effectiveness serves to integrate sustainable processes by which the College demonstrates its success in accomplishing its mission and meeting its goals; to serve as the College’s stewards by maintaining accountability to its constituents for continuous assessment and quality improvement; and to ensure regulatory and compliance obligations are met. The Department of Constituent Relations provides support to the College community through philanthropic engagement and student, alumni, and institutional advisory council relations.

Safety and Security

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is dedicated to the safety of College students, faculty, and staff. The College works collaborative with the Christ Hospital department of Safety and Security whose mission is to promote a safe and secure environment that is conducive to excellence in patient care. The department carries out this mission by deterring and preventing crime, educating the hospital staff/employees in all aspects of crime prevention and survival awareness, enforcing hospital rules, city ordinances and State of Ohio laws and investigating complaints, offense reports, auto accidents and any other unusual or suspicious activity on campus.

Emergency Phone Numbers

Updated 8/28/17

Safety and Security 513-585-2222

Cincinnati Police Department (District 4) 513-352-3576

Cincinnati Fire/EMS 513-352-2381

The Christ Hospital Emergency Services 513-585-2235

Rape Crisis Center (24 hours) 513-381-5610

Poison Control 513-558-5111

About The Safety and Security Department

The Christ Hospital Department of Safety and Security is responsible for campus safety at the College. Its jurisdiction covers all campus property. Its personnel do not have arrest authority. However the Safety and Security Department has a close working relationship with local law enforcement agencies, including the Cincinnati Police Department, which assist the Department of Safety and Security when necessary. The College does not have a written memoranda of agreement pursuant to which local law enforcement investigate alleged criminal offenses, but the Cincinnati Police Department, District 4, is notified of all crimes committed on The Christ Hospital Health Network property.

The Christ Hospital Department of Safety and Security is located on B-level of the hospital, near Pharmacy. The staff of professional officers is available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. _To reach an officer, dial extention **52222 **from any hospital phone, or 513-585-2222 from off campus. Officers in the Safety and Security Department have received private police and security training. In extreme emergencies, Safety and Security will contact the Cincinnati Police Department to assist.

All incidents involving students, staff, faculty, or administration or that occur on college property should also be reported to their direct supervisor or instructor and the Chief Academic Officer. If the incident occurred at a non-TCH clinical location, the person reporting the incident should report this to their direct supervisor or instructor and the Dean of Operations immediately.

TCH Escort Service

Safety and Security offers an escort service anywhere on hospital property to assure safe travel. This service is available seven days a week. To reach the escort service, dial 513-585-5222 or extension 52222 from any hospital or college phone.

Crime Log

The Christ Hospital Safety and Security Department maintains a log of all crimes reported. The crime log is available for the most recent sixty days at any time and is available for public view at the Safety and Security office on 7 North within The Christ Hospital. Requests for crime logs older than sixty days will require up to two business days to fulfill.

Added 10/20/15

Annual Security Report

Annual Security Report and Disclosure of Crime Statistics

TCCNHS is committed to taking the actions necessary to provide a safe and secure working/learning environment for all students and staff. Members of the campus community can feel safe and comfortable knowing that security procedures are in place that represent best practices in the field, and are constantly tested and re-evaluated for their effectiveness.

An Annual Security Report (ASR) and annual disclosure of crime statistics will be prepared by the Associate Dean of Compliance in cooperation with local law enforcement authorities and includes information provided by them as well as by the College’s campus security authorities and various other elements of the College. Each year an e-mail notification is made to all enrolled students that provides the web site to access this report. Faculty and staff receive similar notifications. Hard copies of the report may also be obtained at no cost by contacting the Senior Executive Assistant to the President.

Reporting Crimes

Reporting a Crime or Serious Incident

The College encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all criminal actions, accidents, injuries, suspicious activities, or other emergencies occurring on campus to the Department of Safety and Security and appropriate police agencies even when the victim of a crime elects not to do so or is unable to make such a report. Such reports should be made as follows:

Report the incident to the Safety and Security Department by calling 513-585-2222. It is important that the person reporting the emergency or unusual activity be able to supply as much of the following information as possible:

  • What is the nature of the emergency or unusual activity? (i.e. fire, assault, auto accident, apparent heart attack, bomb threat, personal attack, theft in progress, suspicious person or vehicle, power outage, natural gas leak, burst pipe, water damage, etc.)
  • Are there personal injuries? How many people are hurt?
  • What is the exact location of the emergency or suspicious activity?
  • Name, telephone number and position (student, employee) of the person making the report?

The College has no officially recognized student organizations with off-campus locations. However, if criminal activity occurs while students are attending school sponsored events or training off campus, the reporting procedures are the same as those stated above.

Students are expected to comply and are held accountable to all nursing and student handbook policies. Please review both handbooks for these policies.

Students who report sexual/physical assault crimes to the Confidential Reporters at IMPACT Student Life Assistance will be notified that IMPACT does not disclose their identity to the College, but that IMPACT will notify the College that the incident occurred. This process will help to identify problems and take steps to protect the College community. If the student wishes for the incident to be reported to the College, IMPACT will then provide the College with a Contact Name, Phone Number, and copy of the incident report for additional details.

Following an intake call or disclosure of such an incident later in the counseling process, IMPACT staff will complete a “Non-Identifying Incident Report” and fax it to the Associate Dean, Compliance.

Other Officials to Whom Crimes May Be Reported

Updated 10/17/15, 8/28/17, 718

The College also has designated other officials to serve as additional campus security authorities. Reports of criminal activity can also be made to these officials. They in turn will ensure that they are reported to the Department of Safety and Security for collection as part of the College’s annual report of crime statistics. These additional campus security authorities are:

Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean, Compliance

513-585-2055 or Maureen.Schwab@thechristcollege.edu

Peggy Nicholas, Secretary, Administrative,

513-585-2433 or Peggy.Nicholas@thechristcollege.edu

Carolyn Hunter, Dean of Operations/Presidential Liaison

513-585-2068 or Carolyn.Hunter@thechristcollege.edu

Meghan Hollowell, Dean of College Support Services,

513-585-4841 or Meghan.Hollowell@thechristcollege.edu

LeeAnn Ballard, Secretary, Administrative,

513-585-2433 or Leeann.Ballard@TheChristCollege.edu

Kelly Simmons, Dean of Academic, Chief Academic Officer,

513-585-1317 or Kelly.Simmons@thechristcollege.edu

Bradley Jackson, Dean of Enrollment Management,

513-585-0116 or Bradley.Jackson@thechristcollege.edu

Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse or Neglect

Added 1/15/16

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is committed to the safety of all individuals within its community, including employees, students, visitors, and particularly minors who come to campus or attend College activities. Minors come to The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (“College”) campus for a variety of reasons. They may visit as prospective students or for other occasions. Whatever the reason for their presence, the College’s employees are to be particularly vigilant regarding their safety and security.

Definitions: A “minor” or “child” is defined as any person under the age of eighteen years old and any person with a physical or mental disability under the age of 21. Minor and child are used interchangeably in this policy. For purposes of this policy, the term “employee” also includes students who are working with minors in a clinical environment or other similar situations.

Consistent with Ohio law, it is the College’s policy that any employee who knows or has reasonable cause to suspect that a minor has been subjected to abuse or neglect, may be subjected to abuse or neglect, or faces a threat of abuse or neglect shall immediately make a report. “Reasonable cause” does not require that the individual making the observation conduct an investigation prior to making the report of his or her suspicion that a child has been abused or neglected or is at risk of it.

The College will make every reasonable effort to conduct its investigation of reported child abuse or neglect in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the person making the report. However, it may be necessary to disclose details in the course of an investigation or when required by law.

Nothing in this policy is intended to prevent non-employees, such as students and visitors, from making a report if they have reasonable cause to suspect that child abuse or neglect has occurred or may occur. Employees and students in clinical must follow the policy of the clinical site.

Procedure

  1. For immediate danger, call local law enforcement.
  2. Reports are to be made to one of the following:

In Cincinnati

Hamilton County Children Services Agency

Child Abuse & Neglect Hotline: 513-241-KIDS (513-241-5437)

In person report: 222 East Central Parkway Hours: 7:30-4:30, Mon-Fri

Cincinnati Police Department

Emergency: 911

Non-emergency: 513-765-1212

In the state of Ohio

Ohio’s Child Abuse Reporting Hotline

1-855-OH-CHILD (1-855-642-4453)

For reporting to agencies outside the state of Ohio

Child Abuse Hotline

1-800-4-A-CHILD

In the state of Indiana

800-800-5556

In the state of Kentucky

877-KYSAFE1

To the extent possible, the report should include the following information:

  • The names and addresses of the child and the child’s parents or the person or persons having custody of the child.
  • The child’s age.
  • The nature and extent of the child’s injuries, abuse, or neglect (or the threat thereof) that is known or reasonably suspected or believed to have occurred, including any evidence of previous injuries, abuse, or neglect.
  • Any other information that might be helpful in establishing the cause of the injury, abuse, or neglect (or the threat thereof) that is known or reasonably suspected or believed to have occurred.
  1. After the report has been made pursuant to Section I, the reporter should promptly provide relevant information to the following college official:

Maureen Schwab, Compliance Officer

513-585-2055 or Maureen.Schwab@thechristcollege.edu.

Criminal Investigations

All crimes occurring on TCH grounds should be reported immediately to Safety and Security.

After being notified of an emergency or suspicious condition on campus, the Safety and Security Department will prepare an offense report on the incident and dispatch officers to the scene. If the matter warrants or requires further police intervention, the Cincinnati Police Department will be notified and summoned to the scene to assist with the investigation.

Students, staff, and visitors should report criminal actions, accidents, injuries, or other emergency incidents to one of the campus security authorities identified above. Once reported, the individual making the report will be encouraged to also report it to appropriate police agencies. If requested, a member of the College staff will assist a student in making the report to the police. Anonymous incident reports can also be made.

The College will protect the confidentiality of victims. Only those with a need to know the identity for purposes of investigating the crime, assisting the victim or disciplining the perpetrator will know the victim’s identity. Moreover, the College will withhold the identity of victims in publicly available records, to the extent permitted by law.

Any victim of a crime who does not want to pursue action within the College disciplinary system or the criminal justice system is nevertheless encouraged to make a confidential report to a campus security authority. With the victim’s permission, a report of the details of the incident can be filed without revealing the victim’s identity. Such a confidential report complies with the victim’s wishes, but still helps the College take appropriate steps to ensure the future safety of the victim and others. With such information, the College can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where a pattern of crime may be developing and alert the community as to any potential danger. These confidential reports are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the College. There are no formal procedures in place that encourage pastoral and professional counselors to inform the persons they are counseling of any procedures to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual report.

Additionally, upon written request, the College will disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence (as that term is defined in Section 16 of Title 18, United States Code), or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by this institution against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such a crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such a crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall be treated as the alleged victim for purposes of this paragraph.

Threat Assessment and Response

The President, Dean of Operations, Dean of College Support Services, Dean of Academics, Dean of Enrollment Management, and Associate Dean of Compliance comprise the Threat Assessment and Response Team. The College’s legal counsel serves as an adviser to the team. Other College personnel and outside resources with relevant areas of specialization and responsibility may be called upon to assist the team, including but not limited Associate Deans, Director of Safety and Security, law enforcement agencies, medical personnel, or other outside experts.

As appropriate to the circumstances of a particular situation, the Threat Assessment and Response Team may engage in activities that include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Receiving reports and gathering and analyzing information regarding acts of violence, behavior of concern or statements and/or potential threats posed by individual(s);
  2. Developing, implementing, and monitoring intervention strategies and management plans, with or without the involvement of other College teams or offices as appropriate, that are designed to respond appropriately to statements, behavior and/or circumstances that generate concern that an individual may pose a risk of harm to a member of the College community, including but not limited to, incidents of violence, threatening behavior or statements, unwanted pursuit, stalking, and harassment;
  3. Coordinating with appropriate authorities, including law enforcement, medical personnel, and other outside agencies, as appropriate.

Confidentiality

All reports under this policy will be handled in a sensitive manner. Information will be shared with others only to the extent necessary to assess and manage the situation and in accordance with state and federal law.

Retaliation

Direct or indirect retaliation against a person for bringing a concern of a threat to the attention of the Threat Assessment and Response Team or for cooperating in the team’s inquiry and resolution of a situation is prohibited. This prohibition of retaliation is in effect regardless of the ultimate outcome of the situation. An individual who engages in retaliation under this policy will be subject to discipline in accordance with the College Catalog or other policies applicable to the issue.

Procedure

All students, faculty and staff should be committed to ensuring the safety and security of the campus and workplace environment. As such, anyone who believes that an individual has committed or may commit an act of violence, is engaging in behavior or making statements that generate concern about the potential for violence, or otherwise may pose a threat to the health or safety of any member of the College community should call the Safety and Security Department immediately at 513-585-2222. In case of an emergency, please dial 911.

Individuals should also make a report to one member of the Threat Assessment and Response Team:

**Gail Kist-Kline, President, **

513-585-1414, Gail.KistKline@TheChristCollege.edu

**Dr. Meghan Hollowell, Dean of College Support Services, **

513-585-4841, Meghan.Hollowell@TheChristCollege.edu

**Dr. Kelly Simmons, Dean of Academics, **

513-585-1317, Kelly.Simmons@TheChristCollege.edu

**Carolyn Hunter, Dean of Operations, **

513-585-2068, Carolyn.Hunter@TheChristCollege.edu

**Brad Jackson, Dean of Enrollment Management, **

513-585-0116, Bradley.Jackson@TheChristCollege.edu

**Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean of Compliance, **

513-585-2055, Maureen.Schwab@TheChristCollege.edu

The Associate Dean of Compliance (Dean of Operations in the absence of the Associate Dean of the Associate Dean of Compliance or designee) will serve as the chair of the Threat Assessment and Response Team and, in consultation with other College officials as appropriate, will assess the reported information and determine whether to convene the team.

In cases where an appropriate level of assessment indicates that a report involves a person who poses a threat to self only, the matter will be referred to the appropriate College official (e.g., student matters will be referred to Impact; employee matters will be referred to Human Resources, Employee Health, and supervisor). In cases where available information suggests that the person may pose a threat to self and others, the team will remain involved and will involve the other officials listed here as appropriate. In cases where a referral is made, the team may be re-involved as necessary and appropriate.

In situations where an individual has concerns about someone’s behavior but is unsure whether such behavior constitutes a “threat” to self or others, the individual should report the information to the Department of Safety and Security and to the Associate Dean of Compliance to allow the College the opportunity to assess the situation and respond as necessary:

A. Students: Concerns about statements and/or behavior of students may be reported to the Associate Dean of Compliance, Maureen Schwab, 513-585-2055, or Maureen.Schwab@TheChristCollege.edu.

B. Faculty or Staff: Concerns about the behavior of faculty or staff may be brought to the employee’s manager.


**Gail Kist-Kline, President, **

513-585-1414, Gail.KistKline@TheChristCollege.edu

Faculty and Academic Staff: Dr. Kelly Simmons

513-585-1317, Kelly.Simmons@TheChristCollege.edu

College Support Service Personnel: Dr. Meghan Hollowell

513-585-4841, Meghan.Hollowell@TheChristCollege.edu

Enrollment Management Personnel: Bradley Jackson

513-585-0116, Bradley.Jackson@TheChristCollege.edu

Operations Personnel: Carolyn Hunter

513-585-2068, Carolyn.Hunter@TheChristCollege.edu

Threat Assessment and Response Team Activities

Outline of Potential Threat Assessment and Response Team Activities

Different threats require different approaches to responding. The following outline of potential team activities is intended to provide insight into some of the options that may, among other strategies, be utilized by the team when it is assessing and managing potential threats. It is not intended to be and should not be construed as an all-inclusive or exclusive list, a mandatory procedure, or a “checklist.” The team will assess and manage each situation in accordance with its best judgment and other applicable College policies, and any of the potential activities listed below may or may not be engaged in, depending on the circumstances of a particular situation.

The Department of Safety and Security and/or other law enforcement agencies will usually coordinate all action in cases of a violent incident or imminent threat of violence on campus.

Once information of concern is received by the team, the information will be evaluated and, if appropriate, representatives from the team will be convened (based on the persons involved and team member availability).

The team, or the Team’s Chair or designee, will first determine whether there is an imminent threat of harm or other emergency situation that requires immediate intervention. If so, the team Chair or designee will notify the Department of Safety and Security, may notify law enforcement, seek emergency medical assistance, or take other appropriate measures to address the imminent threat or situation. If not, the team or some portion of the team will usually conduct an initial screening to determine whether a full inquiry is warranted. There may be times when the student or employee making the potential threat will not be permitted on campus until an investigation has been conducted.

If the team determines that there is not an emergency or imminent threat of harm, but that a full inquiry is warranted, the team will conduct a full inquiry to determine whether the person or situation of concern may pose a threat of violence or other harm. As part of its inquiry, the team may obtain information from multiple sources including, but not limited to, faculty, students, family members, or others who may have relevant knowledge or information. Community members are encouraged to cooperate fully with and provide information to the team.

The team will evaluate the information obtained in the course of the inquiry to determine whether the person or situation in question appears to pose a threat of violence or other harm.

If the team determines that the person or situation poses a threat of violence or other harm, it usually will then develop, implement, monitor, and document a management plan designed to intervene and reduce the risk of harm that may be posed by the individual. The management plan may include, but is not limited to, the following (as circumstances and resources may dictate): release of a timely warning; family/parental notification; law enforcement intervention; disciplinary review and action; a behavioral contract; voluntary referral for mental health evaluation or treatment; mandated psychological assessment or other medical treatment; voluntary or involuntary withdrawal or suspension from the College; expulsion or dismissal; modification of the environment or other reasonable accommodations to mitigate risk; collaboration with the identified alleged target(s) to decrease vulnerability; engaging with the person of concern to de-escalate the situation; and ongoing monitoring.

If the team determines that the person of concern does not pose a threat, the team may take no action or may opt to monitor the person or situation for a period of time and re-evaluate the case, as necessary.

Cases handled by the team will generally remain open until a management plan is no longer necessary.

The team will participate in periodic training and conduct periodic assessments of outcomes of its management plans and actions taken.

TCH Building Access

Updated 6/6/16; Updated 9/12/16

The Christ Hospital and The Christ College are private institutions and reserve the right to restrict access and movement on their grounds to staff, students, patients, visitors and others who are conducting business on site. Students and staff are issued I.D. badges. Your I.D. badge serves as your access card to enter parking lots and hospital and College doors and to identify you on the campus and while participating in College activities. All students, faculty and staff are to wear their badges whenever on TCCNHS property or engaged in College activities. Persons without an identification badge visible may be asked to identify themselves and/or to properly display their badge.

  • Student and employee access to the College is by badge only.
  • Students may gain entrance with their access card seven days a week from 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
  • I.D. badges cannot be transferred to anyone else under any circumstance.
  • Students who do not have their badge with them and visitors may be granted access into the building from 8-4:30 by the receptionist. Upon entering, they must sign in and wear an identification badge provided at the front desk. Upon exiting, they must sign out and return the identification badge.
  • Recurrent failure to utilize and wear an identification badge may result in disciplinary action for students and employees.
  • The College may be closed to access during extended periods over holiday breaks. These periods will be communicated to students, faculty, and staff via College email.

What if I lose my badge?

If you lose your I.D. badge, report it immediately to Safety and Security at x52222. Current students needing replacement badges should do the following:

  1. Provide the $20.00 payment fee to the Bursar in the Student Accounts Office. Students will be given a notice of payment receipt which they must bring when obtaining their new badge. If your badge has been stolen the $20.00 replacement fee will be waived if documentation such as a police report or written statement from security, can be provided.
  2. Contact the Analyst, College Systems to schedule an appointment for photo (if needed) and badge reissue. Reissue appointments can be scheduled Monday through Thursday from 8am to 4pm.

Visitors in the Classroom

Added 10/21/15

Visitors, including children, are not allowed in classrooms unless they are enrolled participants in the course. An exception is permitted for classes or courses which expressly utilize children as a part of the instructional process. Only registered students and authorized staff/volunteers may participate in field trips, retreats, or other College authorized travel activities.

Weapons Policy

Added 8/24/15

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Science follows the policy of The Christ Hospital related to possession of weapons (policy 1.01.123) on on-campus property. Refer to the administrative policy on the http://mytch.tchhn.com website. The possession, use, or distribution of weapons, explosives or incendiaries shall not be permitted unless specifically authorized and to do so would constitute a major infraction. Additionally, anything used to threaten, harm, or disrupt the College community including but not limited to, firecrackers, compressed air or spring activated guns, pellet guns, BB guns, paintball guns and knives of any type or other items which are deemed threatening by the College are not permitted. In accordance with state law, signs posted on the College building indicate that “Carrying Weapons is Prohibited on this Property”.

“State commissioned law enforcement officers are authorized to retain their firearms while visiting the facility or conducting investigations on hospital premises (policy 1.01.123).”

Penalties for an Infraction:

• Employees incur disciplinary action which may result in a decision-making leave or discharge.

• Student infraction(s) will be addressed by the code of conduct process and may result in a full range of sanctions including dismissal from the College.

• Visitors are subject to sanctions up to and including a permanent no-trespassing order for College property.

Policy Exceptions:

The Dean/President may grant policy exceptions based on unusual facts or circumstances. Exceptions must not violate federal, state or local laws or regulations, including governmental rules. In evaluating a request for an exception, the Dean/President will meet the following standards:

• If there is any question as to whether the exception may implicate federal, state or local laws or regulations, the President and General Counsel must be consulted before the exception is granted.

• Should the facts and circumstances indicate a recurring issue, the Dean/President should consider revising the policy.

• Exceptions to the policies must be documented and maintained by the department making the decision. Policy exception documentation should be maintained for 5 years after the decision is made.

Parking

Updated 10/31/15

Parking is available to students at an off-site designated area. The fee to park is $200 per year ($100 fall semester, $100 spring semester, and no fee summer session). Authorized vehicles are issued a parking badge to use the facility.

Shuttle Bus Service

  • Parking for Christ College students is provided at the Baldwin Building Garage located at 655 Eden Park Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45202.
  • The TCHHN Safety and Security Department provides shuttle service between the Baldwin Garage and the College, Monday through Friday. A schedule of pick ups and drop offs will be communicated to students prior to the start of each semester. After hours and for emergencies students and staff can directly contact Safety and Security.

NOTE: Location of student parking is subject to change based on contracted services and construction.

Additional Parking

  • Limited parking is available on public streets near campus. Vehicles parked in violation of the Cincinnati Parking Authority are subject to a motor vehicle infraction and towing at the owner’s expense. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences is not responsible for the safety or protection of motor vehicles or their contents.
  • Students enrolled in eligible* evening classes and clinicals may be permitted to park in The Christ Hospital employee parking garage (P3), if space is available. Those students who park in the Hospital garage(s) without permission will be subject to tickets issued by The Christ Hospital Health Network’s Safety and Security Department. These tickets should be paid to the Bursar by cash or check. Tickets unpaid at the end of the semester will result in a hold on registration.

*Eligible evening classes and clinicals will be defined and communicated to the students prior to the start of each semester.

Vehicle Assistance

Safety and Security is available to assist stranded motorists with vehicle problems on hospital property. For help, call 513-585-2222 or extension x52222 from any hospital phone.

Posting Signs & Notices on Campus

Revised 8/19/15; Updated 8/17/17; 11/9/17

The main goal of posting signs is to communicate information of importance to the student population, and to communicate information that is relevant to the entire institution. The posting of signs, notices, and paper communications within and upon The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences premises and building is restricted to those approved as described in the Policy on Posting Signs/Notices on Campus. Key points of this policy are that only approved signs/notices may be posted. Approvals are to be obtained from the Dean of College Support Services or the Assistant to the President. Any signage without approval will be taken down. For submission procedures please refer to the Policy on Posting Signs/Notices on Campus, which can be located in the offices of the Dean of Operations and the Assistant to the President.

College Emergency Procedures

The purpose of these procedures is to increase the protection of lives and property through a collaborative effort with The Christ Hospital Department of Safety and Security, the College, and local fire and police departments.

Fire Plan

  1. If fire or smoke is discovered, pull the nearest pull station. When you activate any system device, it will immediately notify the Cincinnati Fire Division and The Christ Hospital Safety and Security Base Station. Notification can also be made internally by calling 111. If you smell smoke, contact The Christ Hospital Safety and Security Base Station at 5-2222 to investigate. When the alarm sounds, evacuate the building immediately using stairwells.
  2. Those with accessibility issues who cannot take the stairs and are on the second floor of the building should progress to the accessibility safe zone on the landing on the second floor in the (front) southwest corner of the building to await rescue assistance.
  3. The Registrar, Assistant Registrar, and Front Desk personnel will bring a classroom assignment list, and map of the building with them upon exiting. This document may be used for verifying presence outside the building, as needed.
  4. Once outside, move to the designated area located on the grass median outside the college on Auburn Avenue. Do not block the entrances to the building.
  5. Keep streets, fire lanes, hydrants, and walkways clear for emergency vehicles and crews.
  6. Do not return to an evacuated building unless permitted to do so by a designated official.

Emergency Communications

  1. The telephone and email system is powered by an uninterruptible power source and will function in case of emergency.
  2. Fire alarm systems are connected to an uninterruptible power source and emergency backup generators.
  3. Building security systems are connected to an uninterruptible power source and emergency backup generators.

Mass Communication of Critical Information

  1. Faculty, staff, and students will be notified of emergency situations via SchoolMessenger text and phone messaging and Outlook email distribution. It is the student’s or employee’s responsibility to ensure that the College has permission to send emergency text and phone messages to the phone number of their choice. The College must have the correct phone number and phone carrier for the alert message to be sent. Students must check (and update as needed) this information with their advisor at least twice yearly during pre-registration appointments and as changes are made. Faculty and staff must maintain this information in their SONISWeb biographic data file. Students must opt-in with SchoolMessenger to be able to receive text messages.
  2. Updates to emergent messages will be placed on the college website as available and appropriate.
  3. Administrative Team members or their designees may send emergency messages.
  4. Students and Faculty in clinical areas will be notified by clinical faculty phone notification. The faculty member is responsible for notifying students within the clinical setting.
  5. All students and personnel are expected to follow the directions of the text, phone, and/or email messages for upmost safety.

All announcements related to the College closing as a result of an emergency or major catastrophic event or severe or inclement weather may be announced in the following locations (NOTE: Students, faculty, and staff are asked to check these locations for updates to determine whether or not the College has officially closed):

  • Alert messaging through text, email, and phone.
  • Blackboard
  • College website “Home Page” at www.TheChristCollege.edu
  • E-mail distribution lists to all students, faculty, and staff
  • College Facebook page
  • Local television

Disaster Plan

After being notified of disaster by normal procedures, the president of the college and/or appointee shall:

  1. Send information and directions through the mass communication of critical information procedures concerning the emergency including:
    1. Considering cancelling all in-house classes immediately.
    2. Required faculty and staff will report to the employee pool (Admitting waiting area on C-level) in the hospital.
    3. Students on campus may also report to the employee pool to assist, but have the option to return home.
    4. Students already working in the hospital will remain in their areas and await further instruction.
    5. Students who are off-campus will be notified of instructions following the mass communication of critical information procedure
  2. Send out additional information as needed at a later time.

Evacuation Plan

  1. Leave the room door open as you leave unless it is a confidential space.
  2. Check rooms on either side for occupancy.
  3. Check the bathroom closest to you for occupancy.
  4. If smoke is present in the nearest stairway, use an alternate.
  5. Walk – DO NOT RUN. Remain calm.
  6. Do not use the elevator. Exits-Use the following exits;

a. Primary: northeast stairway, discharging to the rear driveway.

b. Primary: southwest stairway, discharging along west side of building.

c. Secondary: southwest tunnel, discharging to the hospital first level lobby door, until emergency equipment arrives.

  1. Upon evacuation, proceed to the grassy area in front of the hospital on the west side of Auburn Avenue. Remain there until directed otherwise by Safety and Security personnel.

Lockdown

  1. Go to the nearest room or office and follow the direction of professor or administrator.
  2. Close the door, lock if possible, or barricade the door with tables, chairs, desk, etc. Cover the door window and remove any timetable or room schedule if possible.
  3. Close all window blinds or curtains, if possible.
  4. Turn off the lights to give the impression that the room is empty.
  5. Seek cover under desks or tables; remain low to the ground and away from windows and doors.
  6. Remain quiet, as if no one is in the room.
  7. Do not answer the door.
  8. Call Security at 513-585-2222 and be ready to provide as much information as possible.
  9. Remain in the secure location until the “All Clear” is received. Lockdown will remain in place until the threat is neutralized.

Active Shooter – Code Silver

If you are concerned that a violent incident may occur, but immediate action is not required, contact Safety/Security at 513-585-2222, your department manager, or a professor/administrator.

Code Silver is a serious act of violence or potential violence which poses an imminent threat to staff or students of the college in which a weapon may be involved.

  1. If possible flee the area quickly and try to avoid danger. Call 911 and then Call Safety/Security at 513-585-2222.
  • Give your location, name and reason for calling.
  • Be ready to provide a physical description of the individual:
  • If the individual is in a vehicle, attempt to get the vehicle make, model and color as well as the license plate number, if possible, but always maintain your own safety.
  1. If unable to flee the area and/or the aggressor is in the building, go to a safe location, lock all doors and secure yourself in your space. Refer to Lockdown procedure above. If possible barricade the door and put distance between yourself and the aggressor. Make use of shielding if possible, i.e.: desk, filing cabinet, etc. Remain as calm as possible. Attempt to get the word out to others if possible.
  2. As a last resort, if the aggressor is in the immediate area and you cannot escape, use countering strategies by distracting the aggressor to help decrease your chances of being a target or by confrontation i.e. throwing objects, yelling, etc. These strategies will be presented in ALICE trainings. Contact the school’s ALICE-trainer for more information.
  3. All reported incidents or threats of violence will be taken seriously. Reports will be investigated promptly and appropriate action taken.

Bomb Threat – Code Black

  1. Notification of a bomb in the facility or on the grounds is usually is made by an outside caller. The person receiving the call should record as much data as possible about the call, including:
  • Exact words of caller
  • Time of call
  • Sex of caller
  • Speech traits of caller e.g. dialect, ethnic origin, slang, slurred, educated, etc.
  • Approximate age of caller
  • Location of device
  • Detonation time and type of device
  • Reason for placement
  • Background noises, if discernable
  1. Repeat all information to your supervisor. Administration will conduct a threat analysis to determine response.
  2. If asked to do so by security or police, search your area for a suspicious or out-of-place package, box, or container. DO NOT TOUCH IF FOUND! Report any suspicious items to your supervisor, security, or police, and exit area.
  3. Security or police will order an evacuation if a suspicious object is found. Administration will arrange and direct the evacuation of students, faculty, staff, and school visitors.
  4. If a suspicious object is found, the Cincinnati Fire Department will carry out removal and/or disarmament procedures. If no object is found, security and Administration will jointly call off the search and instruct those involved to resume normal operations.

Earthquake

The actual movement of the ground in an earthquake is seldom the direct cause of death or injury. Most casualties result from falling objects and debris because the shocks can shake, damage, or demolish buildings. Earthquakes usually strike without warning. In most cases the shock occurs and ends within seconds, which precludes any personal protective action during the tremor. In any event, if you have time, cover your head and shoulders and try to protect yourself from falling objects or shattered glass.

Immediate Response Measures – All Personnel

  1. Upon detection of shock – remain in place, try to remain calm and think through the consequences of any action you take. Try to remain calm and reassure others around you.
  2. If indoors, watch for falling plaster, light fixtures and other objects. Watch out for high storage areas, shelves and tall equipment which might slide or topple. Stay away from windows and mirrors. If in danger, get under table, desk, bed, or in a corner away from windows, or in a strong doorway.
  3. Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury.
  4. If telephones are working, contact Safety/Security Communication Center at 513-585-2222 and report condition of injured persons and damage.
  5. Check for fire or fire hazards from broken electrical lines or short circuits.

Tornado – Code Gray

Updated 7/27/16

In the event of a tornado warning or watch, the following plan will be activated based on the potential or real threat to students, faculty, staff, administration and visitors. In the event of a SEVERE STORM WARNING or TORNADO WATCH the College will not initiate a response. In the event of a TORNADO WARNING, the procedure will be as follows:

  1. Students, faculty, and staff will be notified through the mass communication procedures, and are expected to move away from windows and glass doorways immediately.
  2. Everyone will use the stairs and go to the innermost part of the building on the lowest possible floor. The designated areas for the TCCNHS are classrooms B11, B12, and B13 or the tunnel. Do NOT use elevators because the power may fail, leaving you trapped.
  3. Once in the designated area, protect your head and make yourself as small a target as possible by crouching down.
  4. Listen for instruction from TCCNHS administration, and do NOT leave the area until the all clear has been given.

Weather Emergency Procedure

TCCNHS takes the position that while the education of all students is vital, where and when conditions warrant, the safety of our students, faculty and staff is paramount. As such, the decision whether the College should close or remain open is based on the overall concern for the College community.

In general, however, TCCNHS practice will be to remain open and to conduct business as usual during periods of inclement weather, except as noted in this policy statement. Therefore, students should expect to attend class during inclement weather, unless otherwise directed. If a student believes he/she cannot commute safely between his/her home and TCCNHS or clinical site, the student is required to notify his/her instructor.

Procedure for Cancellation and Closure

The College will generally base its decision to delay and close/cancel classes on various criteria, including weather forecasts or other media reports, severity of conditions, and/or other environmental or other factors. A general framework for determining to cancel classes:

a. The decision for closing the College will be made by the President of the College or designee, who will coordinate all activities associated with all-weather crisis situations as they relate to the College.

b. A decision to close or cancel day classes will, under most circumstances, be made as early as possible, preferably by 5:00 AM the day in question to get the announcement out to the media in a timely manner.

c. Major road closures (i.e. interstate highways that lead to the College, including but not limited to I-71, I-75, I-74, I-275) within a 50 mile radius due to safety concerns.

d. If the decision is made in the middle of the day regarding evening classes, the decision should be made by noon, if at all possible.

e. On-line courses will be held as scheduled during inclement weather despite closure of the college, unless otherwise directed.

f. If the College does not close/cancel classes, the College will open for business at the stated times located at the front desk and in the student handbook.

g. All announcements related to the College closing as a result of inclement weather or other emergencies will be announced in the following locations (Note: Students, faculty, and staff are asked to check these locations for updates to determine whether or not the College has officially closed):

  • Alert messaging through text, email, and phone.
  • Local television and news media outlets
  • College Website Home Page
  • Blackboard Home Page Announcements
  • Outlook E-mail Distribution Lists to all students, faculty, and staff
  • The voicemail of the College front desk

Closure of the College

Should inclement weather arise or be anticipated that would make it inadvisable to operate the College on a given day, the president or designee may, at his/her discretion, close the institution. In the event that the College is closed, no classes or extracurricular activities are to be held on campus. Closure of the college does not constitute closure of off-campus offerings, such as clinical. Note- please see off-campus offerings section below.

In the event that closure of the College disrupts the design of a particular face-to-face course, the instructor of the course is responsible for determining the need for a “courses meet online” approach. The “courses meet online” approach, if used, will be designed to help meet class outcomes through online course work (i.e. discussion boards, etc.). Faculty will accommodate students by giving soft due dates to give students time to access the internet and complete assignments.

In the event that closure of the College causes a hybrid course to miss one of its pre-scheduled face-to-face meetings, the instructor of the course has the right to reschedule the face-to-face meeting another week using the same time and day of the week.

*Note: While the institution recognizes the need for some students to know as early as possible when classes/clinical are canceled, certain weather patterns or emergencies may not allow for immediate decision-making. Unless the College has formally announced, it is to be assumed that all classes and clinical rotations will continue as scheduled. Students, faculty, and staff who live in remote/rural areas or are otherwise impacted may need to make decisions not to attend classes or clinical rotations based on safety concerns. The College respects this right, but does not guarantee students’ relief in terms of absence or grading.

Reopening of the College

The College will reopen at the beginning of the first complete shift of the workday immediately following the day(s) of closure unless otherwise directed. In the event that weather improves over the course of the day, the president or designee may, at his/her discretion, reopen the College for evening classes, clinical, and/or activities including those hybrid courses that may have a scheduled face-to-face meeting. The decision to reopen the College should be made by noon the day in question, if at all possible.

Off-Campus Offerings

Courses held at off-campus locations will be subject to the policies and procedures of the governing body (i.e. clinical at The Christ Hospital). The following guidelines will be used when considering cancellation of off-campus offerings:

• If clinical sites are open (i.e. hospitals) then clinical will be held according to the normal schedule.

• If faculty cannot attend they must attempt to get coverage or arrange another clinical day.

• The State of Ohio requires the College to offer the number of clinical hours it advertises. If an individual(s) cannot attend, each student will follow the course syllabus.

• In the event of a level 3 snow emergency in the clinical site’s respective county, clinical will be canceled.

Cancellation of TCCNHS-Sponsored Activities or Events in the Absence of College Closure

Should inclement weather conditions arise or be anticipated that would make it inadvisable to conduct a TCCNHS-sponsored activity or event on a date when the College otherwise remains open, the sponsoring department has the option to cancel or postpone the function.

Civil Disturbance

A civil disorder may escalate a minor disturbance to a major riot through the actions of one or a group of individuals who are well organized. The first ingredient is a cause or reason for upsetting the normal routine or committing aggressive action against the college, hospital, its personnel, visitors, or patients.

  1. When it has been determined that an individual or group of individuals are on the property on other than official or medically related business, Safety/Security Communication Center should be notified at x52222.
  2. Safety/Security personnel shall approach individual(s), if safe to do so, and inform party that such activities are not permitted on hospital property and that they must depart immediately or they will be considered trespassing.
  3. If the individuals do not depart or if approaching the parties involved would jeopardize the safety of individuals. Notify Safety and Security who will notify the Cincinnati police. Any instances of picketing, demonstrations or civil disturbances shall immediately be reported to the Director of Safety/Security, Administration and Public Relations.

Sex Offender Information

Access of information about registered sex offenders: The campus community may obtain law enforcement agency information provided by the state of Ohio concerning registered sex offenders through the Associate Dean, Compliance or at: .

Non-Discrimination and Sexual MisconductLast updated: February 11, 2019

Updated on 11/21/16; 9/18/17; 12/13/17

Policy

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences (the “College”) is committed to providing an environment for work and study free from discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, citizenship, religion, ethnicity, age, gender, gender identity, genetics, marital status, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, military or veteran status, disability, or any other status protected by local, state, or federal law (collectively, “protected statuses”). This prohibition against discrimination also includes harassment. Harassment of any person or groups of persons based on their protected status is prohibited by the College.

Scope

Updated 618

This policy applies to all College employees, including staff, faculty, and administrators; students; applicants for employment; customers; third-party contractors; and all other persons that participate in the College’s educational programs and activities, including third-party visitors on campus and minors (the “College Community”). For the purposes of this Policy, individuals are considered to be “Employees” when they are currently being paid by the College. Individuals are considered to be “Students” after their matriculation fee has been paid and recorded until graduation or when they have been withdrawn or dismissed from the College. The College’s prohibition on discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct extends to all aspects of its educational programs and activities, including, but not limited to, admissions, employment, academics, and student services.

The College has jurisdiction over conduct covered by this policy occurring on campus, during or at an official College program or activity (regardless of location), or off campus when the conduct could create a hostile environment on campus. The College will investigate all complaints made under this policy and, if necessary, take action to prevent the recurrence of discrimination or harassment and remedy its effects.

Sexual harassment, sexual misconduct or interpersonal violence involving a minor who is a student will be processed consistent with this Policy. Anyone witnessing or otherwise knowing of a violation of this policy that involves a non-student individual under the age of 18, or under the age of 21 and physically or mentally impaired, should refer to the College’s Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse or Neglect Policy. Any observed violations of that policy should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator and/or to the Safety and Security Department and the person in charge of the program. Whether involving a student or non-student, the College, the Title IX Coordinator, employees, and/or privileged and confidential resources also may be required to report sexual misconduct involving a minor to Hamilton County’s Children & Family Services at (513) 241-KIDS (5437). (Adapted from John Carroll University Sexual Harassment and Interpersonal Violence Policy).

Title IX Statement

It is the policy of the College to comply with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, which prohibit discrimination based on sex in the College’s educational programs and activities. Title IX and its implementing regulations also prohibit retaliation for asserting claims of sex discrimination.

The College has designated the following Title IX Coordinator to coordinate its compliance with Title IX and to receive inquiries regarding Title IX, including complaints of sex discrimination:

Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean of Compliance/Title IX Coordinator 513-585-2055 Maureen.Schwab@thechristcollege.edu

Medical Office Building, Office 306.

The College has also designated the following Deputy Title IX Coordinator to assist the Title IX Coordinator in carrying out his or her duties under this policy:

Dr. Meghan Hollowell, Dean of College Support Services/Deputy Title IX Coordinator, 513-585-4841 or Meghan.Hollowell@thechristcollege.edu, Main College Building office 121.

A person may also file a complaint of sex discrimination with the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights regarding an alleged violation of Title IX by visiting www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html or by calling 1-800-421-3481.

Prohibited Conduct

Discrimination

Discrimination occurs when a person is excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, any College program or activity because of the person’s protected status. The policy provides a more specific definition of sex discrimination below.

Harassment

Harassment is generally defined as verbal, physical, graphic, or written (including through electronic media) conduct based on or motivated by an individual’s protected status that unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work or academic performance or creates a hostile work or educational environment by interfering with or limiting a person’s ability to participate in the College’s educational programs and activities. Such words or conduct include, but are not limited to, objectionable epithets, demeaning depictions or treatment, and threatened or actual abuse or harm. The policy provides a more specific definition of sexual harassment below.

Sexual Misconduct

“Sexual misconduct” is an umbrella term covering sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. This term will be used throughout the remainder of this policy and the Complaint Resolution Procedures when collectively referring to these types of conduct.

Sexual misconduct can occur when the complainant and the respondent are members of the same or opposite sex, and the College’s prohibition of sexual misconduct applies regardless of national origin, immigration status, or citizenship status.

Sex Discrimination

Sex discrimination occurs when persons are excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, any College program or activity because of their sex. Sex discrimination can include adverse treatment based on one’s sex, as well as the other prohibited conduct outlined below. Sex discrimination includes discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, gender identity, and failure to conform to stereotypical notions of femininity and masculinity.

Sexual Harassment

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature and includes sexual advances, for sexual favors, and other verbal, physical, graphic, or written conduct of a sexual nature when:

  1. Submission to such conduct is made or threatened to be made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of an individual’s employment or education
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used or threatened to be used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual, or
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s academic or professional performance or creating what a reasonable person would perceive as an intimidating, hostile, or offensive employment, or education environment

Examples of Sexual Harassment

  • Some examples of sexual harassment include:
  • Pressure for a dating, romantic, or intimate relationship
  • Unwelcome touching, kissing, hugging, rubbing, or massaging
  • Pressure for sexual activity
  • Unnecessary references to parts of the body
  • Sexual innuendos, jokes, humor, or gestures
  • Displaying sexual graffiti, pictures, videos or posters
  • Using sexually explicit profanity
  • Asking about, or telling about, sexual fantasies, sexual preferences, or sexual activities
  • Social media use that violates this policy
  • Leering or staring at someone in a sexual way, such as staring at a person’s breasts or groin
  • Sending sexually explicit emails or text messages
  • Commenting on a person’s dress in a sexual manner
  • Giving unwelcome personal gifts such as flowers, chocolates, or lingerie that suggest the desire for a romantic relationship
  • Commenting on a person’s body, gender, sexual relationships, or sexual activities
  • Sexual violence (as defined below)

Sexual Violence

Definition of Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is a particularly severe form of prohibited sexual harassment. Sexual violence includes physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent because of his or her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity, because he or she is below the minimum age of consent in the applicable jurisdiction, or because of his or her incapacitation due to the use of drugs and/or alcohol. Other types of conduct may also constitute sexual violence.

Examples of Sexual Violence

Some examples of sexual violence include:

  • Rape or sexual assault: sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal) by a man or woman upon a man or woman without consent
  • The use of force or coercion to effect sexual intercourse or some other form of sexual contact with a person who has not given consent
  • Unwilling sexual penetration (anal, vaginal, or oral) or other sexual touching with any object or body part that is committed by force, threat, intimidation, or otherwise without consent
  • Having sexual intercourse with a person who is unconscious because of drug or alcohol use
  • Hazing that involves penetrating a person’s vagina or anus with an object
  • Sexual exploitation, which includes, but is not limited to, the following:
  • Sexual voyeurism
  • Use of the “date rape drug” to effect sexual intercourse or some other form of sexual contact with a person
  • Knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted disease such as HIV to another person through sexual activity
  • Secretly videotaping or photographing sexual activity where the other party has not consented
  • Disseminating sexual pictures or videos of another person without consent regardless if the pictures or videos were obtained with consent
  • Prostituting another person

Consent

Lack of consent is a critical factor in determining whether sexual violence has occurred. Consent is informed, freely given, and mutually understood. Consent requires an affirmative act or statement by each participant. Consent is not passive.

  • If coercion, intimidation, threats, and/or physical force are used, there is no consent; a person’s lack of verbal resistance or submission resulting from the use or threat of force does not constitute consent.
  • If a person is mentally or physically incapacitated or impaired by alcohol or drugs such that the person cannot understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual situation, there is no consent.
  • Warning signs of when a person may be incapacitated due to drug and/or alcohol use include: slurred speech, falling down, passing out, and vomiting.
  • If a person is asleep or unconscious, there is no consent.
  • A person who is under age in the applicable jurisdiction cannot provide consent to sexual activity.
  • Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity.
  • Consent to past sexual activity does not imply consent to future sexual activity.
  • Dressing in a certain manner does not constitute consent.
  • Consent to sexual activity with one person does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity with another.
  • Consent can be withdrawn. A person who initially consents to sexual activity is deemed not to have consented to any sexual activity that occurs after he or she withdraws consent.
  • Being in a romantic relationship with someone does not imply consent to any form of sexual activity.
  • Effective consent may not exist when there is a disparity in power between the parties (e.g., faculty/student, supervisor/employee).

Coercion

When force or intimidation is used to make someone do something they do not want to do. This includes physical, emotional, psychological, social, or other threat. This also applies when a person is incapacitated.

Incapacitation

The state of being impaired or in a physical or mental state where the person lacks the ability to knowingly and deliberately make a choice including if asleep or unconscious. A person who is asleep, unconscious, or involuntarily restrained is incapacitated and cannot give effective consent.

Indicators of incapacitation include, but are not limited to: outrageous/unusual behavior; inability or diminished ability to accurately discern one’s environment (who, what, where, when and/or how); slurred speech; vomiting; severe intoxication; loss of voluntary motor skills; loss of involuntary motor skills; disjointed speech patterns (unable to follow a conversation or verbalize complete thoughts); and/or sleepiness that demonstrates an inability to control one’s ability to stay awake. Because incapacitation may be difficult to discern, the person seeking the sexual behavior is strongly encouraged to err on the side of caution; i.e., when in doubt, assume the other person is incapacitated and therefore unable to give effective consent (John Carroll University Sexual Harassment and Interpersonal Violence Policy).

Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

The crimes of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking can also constitute sexual misconduct when motivated by a person’s sex. These types of conduct, no matter the motivation behind them, are a violation of this policy and will be addressed pursuant to the Complaint Resolution Procedures below.

Domestic Violence

Ohio law provides a definition of “Domestic Violence” at Section 3113.31 of the Ohio Revised Code. Under this statute, domestic violence means the occurrence of one or more of the following acts against a family or household member: (a) attempting to cause or recklessly causing bodily injury; (b) place another person by the threat of force in fear of imminent serious physical harm…; © committing any act with respect to a child that would result in the child being an abused child…; (d) committing a sexually oriented offense.

“Family or household member” means any of the following:

(a) Any of the following who is residing with or has resided with the respondent:

  • A spouse, a person living as a spouse, or a former spouse of the respondent;
  • A parent, foster parent, or a child of the respondent, or another person related by consanguinity or affinity to the respondent;
  • A parent or a child of a spouse, person living as a spouse, or former spouse of the respondent, or another person related by consanguinity or affinity to a spouse, person living as a spouse, or former spouse of the respondent.

(b) The natural parent of any child of whom the respondent is the other natural parent or is the putative other natural parent.

“Person living as a spouse” means a person who is living or has lived with the respondent in a common law marital relationship, who otherwise is cohabiting with the respondent, or who otherwise has cohabited with the respondent within five years prior to the date of the alleged occurrence of the act in question.

Dating Violence

“Dating Violence”, which is not defined under Ohio law, is characterized by violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of the relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Stalking

Stalking is referred to as “Menacing by Stalking” in Section 2903.211 of the Ohio Revised Code. It is defined as follows:

(A)(1) No person by engaging in a pattern of conduct shall knowingly cause another person to believe that the offender will cause physical harm to the other person or cause mental distress to the other person.

(2) No person, through the use of any electronic method of remotely transferring information, including but not limited to, any computer, computer network, computer program, or computer system, shall post a message with purpose to urge or incite another to commit a violation of division (A)(1) of this section.

(3) No person, with sexual motivation, shall violate division (A)(1) or (2) of this section.

Terms as used in this section:

(1) “Pattern of conduct” means two or more actions or incidents closely related in time, whether or not there has been a prior conviction based on any of those actions or incidents. …[T]he posting of messages or receipt of information or data through the use of an electronic method of remotely transferring information, including, but not limited to, a computer, computer network, computer program, computer system, or telecommunications device, may constitute a “pattern of conduct.”

(2) “Mental distress” means any of the following: (a) any mental illness or condition that involves some temporary substantial incapacity; (b) any mental illness or condition that would normally require psychiatric treatment, psychological treatment, or other mental health services, whether or not any person requested or received psychiatric treatment, psychological treatment, or other mental health services.

(7) “Post a message” means transferring, sending, posting, publishing, disseminating, or otherwise communicating, or attempting to transfer, send, post, publish, disseminate, or otherwise communicate, any message or information, whether truthful or untruthful, about an individual, and whether done under one’s own name, under the name of another, or while impersonating another.

Roles and Responsibilities

A. Title IX Coordinator

It is the responsibility of the Title IX Coordinator to: (1) ensure the College’s compliance with Title IX; (2) identify and address any patterns or systemic problems of sexual misconduct at the College; (3) coordinate dissemination of information and education and training programs; (4) receive complaints under this policy; (5) assist members of the College Community in understanding that discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct is prohibited by this policy; (6) answer questions about this policy; (7) ensure that employees and students are aware of the procedures for reporting and addressing complaints of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct; and (8) to implement the Complaint Resolution Procedures or to designate appropriate persons for implementing the Complaint Resolution Procedures. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator will assist the Title IX Coordinator in carrying out these responsibilities.

B. Administrators, Deans, Department Chairs, and Other Managers

It is the responsibility of administrators, deans, department chairs, and other managers (i.e., those that formally supervise other employees) to:

  • Inform employees under their direction or supervision of this policy
  • Work with the Title IX Coordinator to implement education and training programs for employees and students
  • Implement any corrective actions that are imposed as a result of findings of a violation of this policy

C. Employees

Throughout this policy, the term “employees” includes all faculty, staff, and administrators. It is the responsibility of employees to review this policy and comply with it.

D. Students

It is the responsibility of students to review this policy and comply with it.

E. The College

When the College is aware that a member of the College Community may have been subjected to or affected by conduct that violates this policy, the College will take prompt action, including a review of the matter and, if necessary, an investigation and appropriate steps to stop and remedy the discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct. The College will act in accordance with its Complaint Resolution Procedures.

Reporting Information

Reporting for Victims

For Those Who Have Experienced Discrimination, Harassment, or Sexual Misconduct

The College encourages any member of the College Community who has experienced discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct to make a report to the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinator.

Contact information:

Maureen Schwab, Associate Dean of Compliance/Title IX Coordinator,

513-585-2055 or Maureen.Schwab@thechristcollege.edu

Medical Office Building Office 306

Dr. Meghan Hollowell, Dean of College Support Services/Deputy Title IX Coordinator,

513-585-4841 or Meghan.Hollowell@thechristcollege.edu Main College Building Office 121

The College encourages persons to make complaints of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct as soon as possible because late reporting may limit the College’s ability to investigate and respond to the conduct complained of.

Employees’ Duty to Report

All College employees have a duty to report discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator within 24 hours when they receive a report of such conduct, witness such conduct, or otherwise obtain information about such conduct. This includes employees who may have a professional license requiring confidentiality if they are not employed by the College in that professional role. An employee not reporting sexual misconduct as required by this policy may be disciplined accordingly, up to and including termination.

This duty to report does not apply to the confidential resources discussed in the next section. College Community members should be aware that disclosing information about discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct to any other employee of the College besides the persons noted in the next section will result in that information being shared with the Title IX Coordinator.

Confidential Discussions

If a victim desires to talk confidentially about his or her situation, there are resources available. Students may have confidential conversations by contacting a counselor through the IMPACT Student Life Assistance Program. Access to the program is available 247 at (866) 780-0855. An IMPACT counselor will not report details regarding the incident to the College for investigation without your consent, though they will make a non-identifying report of information about crimes for inclusion in the College’s annual disclosure of crime statistics. For more information about the IMPACT counseling services, please contact the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator.

Students may also have confidential conversations by contacting Women Helping Women, 247 at 513-381-5610

Content of a Report

So that the College has sufficient information to investigate a complaint, the complaint should include: (1) the date(s) and time(s) of the alleged conduct; (2) the names of all person(s) involved in the alleged conduct, including possible witnesses; (3) all details outlining what happened; and (4) contact information for the complainant so that the College may follow up appropriately.

Information Provided to Complainant and Respondent

A complainant who makes a claim of sexual misconduct to the College will be given a copy of the document titled “Rights and Options Related to Sexual Misconduct.” This document provides information about this policy and the Complaint Resolution Procedures used to investigate and resolve complaints of sexual misconduct, options for filing complaints with the local police, resources that are available on campus and in the community, etc. The respondent will also be given similar information about the process and resources.

Conduct that Constitutes a Crime

Any person who wishes to make a complaint of conduct falling under this policy that also constitutes a crime—including sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking—is encouraged to make a complaint to local law enforcement. If requested, the College will assist the complainant in notifying the appropriate law enforcement authorities. In the event of an emergency, please contact 911. A victim may decline to notify such authorities.

Vendors, Contractors, and Third-Parties

This policy applies to the conduct of vendors, contractors, and third parties. Members of the College Community who believe they have been subject to discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct in violation of this policy by a vendor, contractor, or other third party can make a complaint in the manner set forth in this section. Likewise, vendors, contractors, and other third parties can also make a complaint under this policy by contacting the Title IX Coordinator.

Amnesty

The College recognizes that an individual who has been drinking alcohol or using drugs may be hesitant to report sexual violence. As such, the College has developed an Amnesty Policy that encourages students to report in these instances. In certain prescribed situations outlined in the policy, a student will not be charged with a Code of Conduct violation under the College’s Alcohol and Drug policy when the student is seeking emergency assistance for themselves or a fellow student. The full Amnesty Policy can be found at Amnesty Policy.

Bad Faith Complaints

While the College encourages all good faith complaints of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct, the College has the responsibility to balance the rights of all parties. Therefore, if the College’s investigation reveals that a complaint was knowingly false, the complaint will be dismissed and the person who filed the knowingly false complaint may be subject to discipline.

External Reports

Though individuals with a concern or complaint of conduct falling under this policy are encouraged to attempt to resolve the situation pursuant to the College’s policy and Complaint Resolution Procedures, some forms of discrimination complaints can also be filed with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and/or the Ohio Civil Rights Commission.

Retaliation Statement

It is a violation of this policy to retaliate against any member of the College Community who reports or assists in making a complaint of discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct or who participates in the investigation of a complaint in any way. Persons who believe they have been retaliated against in violation of this policy should make a complaint to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator as described above.

Concerning Complaints

Special Guidance Concerning Complaints of Sexual Violence Including Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking

If you are the victim of sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, do not blame yourself. These crimes are never the victim’s fault. When a physical crime of violence has been perpetrated against you, the College recommends that you immediately go to the emergency room of a local hospital and contact local law enforcement, in addition to making a prompt complaint under this policy.

If you are the victim of sexual violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, do everything possible to preserve evidence by making certain that the crime scene is not disturbed. Preservation of evidence may be necessary for proof of the crime or in obtaining a protection order. As necessary to preserve evidence, victims of sexual violence, domestic violence, or dating violence should not bathe, urinate, douche, brush teeth, or drink liquids until after they are examined and, if necessary, a rape examination is completed. Clothes should not be changed. When necessary, seek immediate medical attention at an area hospital and take a full change of clothing, including shoes, for use after a medical examination. Rape examinations are available at any UC Hospital Emergency Department or St. Elizabeth Hospital Emergency Department.

It is also important to take steps to preserve evidence in cases of stalking, to the extent such evidence exists. In cases of stalking, evidence is more likely to be in the form of letters, emails, text messages, social media posts, etc., rather than evidence of physical contact and violence.

After A Complaint is Made

Once a complaint of sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking is made to the College, the complainant has several options such as, but not limited to:

  • Contacting parents or a relative
  • Seeking legal advice
  • Seeking personal counseling (always recommended)
  • Pursuing legal action against the perpetrator
  • Pursuing disciplinary action through the College
  • Requesting that no further action be taken
  • Requesting further information about the College’s policy and procedures for addressing conduct of this nature
  • Requesting further information about available resources

After a Report Has Been Made

A. Protecting the Complainant

Pending final outcome of an investigation in accordance with the Complaint Resolution Procedures, the College will take steps to protect the complainant from further discrimination or harassment. This may include assisting and allowing the complainant to change his or her academic, transportation, or work situation, to the extent that the College has control over these environments, if options to do so are reasonably available and upon request of the complainant. Such changes may be available regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to local law enforcement. Requests to change an academic, transportation, or work situation, or for any other protective measure, should be made to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator. The College will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the complainant to the extent that maintaining confidentiality will not impair the College’s ability to provide them. If necessary to disclose personal information to provide an accommodation or protective order, the College will endeavor to notify the complainant before doing so.

If a complainant has obtained an ex parte order of protection, full order of protection, or any other temporary restraining order or no contact order against the alleged perpetrator from a criminal, civil, or tribal court, the complainant should provide such information to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator. The College, in conjunction with The Christ Hospital Department of Safety and Security, will take all reasonable and legal action to implement the order.

Particular care will be taken to protect complainant’s that are minors. In addition to the protections available to all complainants, this also includes, but is not limited to, the College fulfilling any reporting obligations required by law when there is reasonable cause to suspect that a minor has been subject to abuse (including sexual violence, dating violence, and domestic violence).

B. Investigation and Confidentiality

All complaints of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct will be promptly and thoroughly investigated in accordance with the Complaint Resolution Procedures, and the College will take disciplinary action where appropriate. The College will make reasonable and appropriate efforts to preserve an individual’s privacy and protect the confidentiality of information when investigating and resolving a complaint. However, because of laws relating to reporting and other state and federal laws, the College cannot guarantee confidentiality to those who make complaints.

In the event a complainant requests confidentiality or asks that a complaint not be investigated, the College will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the request for confidentiality or request not to pursue an investigation. If a complainant insists that his or her name not be disclosed to the alleged perpetrator, the College’s ability to respond may be limited. The College reserves the right to initiate an investigation despite a complainant’s request for confidentiality in limited circumstances involving serious or repeated conduct or where the alleged perpetrator may pose a continuing threat to the College Community.

The Title IX Coordinator is the person responsible for evaluating requests for confidentiality. The Title IX Coordinator may consult with other appropriate College officials and legal counsel as necessary.

C. Resolution

If a complaint of discrimination, harassment, or sexual misconduct is found to be substantiated, the College will take appropriate corrective and remedial action to prevent the recurrence of the conduct and correct its discriminatory effects. Students and employees found to be in violation of this policy will be subject to discipline up to and including written reprimand, probation, suspension, demotion, termination, or expulsion. Affiliates and program participants may be removed from College programs and/or prevented from returning to campus. Remedial steps may also include counseling for the complainant, academic and work accommodations for the complainant, separation of the parties, and training for the respondent and other persons.

Complaint Resolution

Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Complaint Resolution Procedure

Updated 8/2/16

General Principles and Procedure

A. Applicability

With one exception noted in the next paragraph, these Complaint Resolution Procedures apply to the resolution of all reports falling under the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy. They apply to the resolution of complaints against students, faculty, administrators, staff, and third parties, and they are the exclusive means of resolving complaints of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct at the College. To the extent there are any inconsistencies between these Complaint Resolution Procedures and other College grievance, complaint, or discipline procedures, these Complaint Resolution Procedures will control the resolution of complaints alleging violations of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy.

Notwithstanding the previous paragraph, if at any point it becomes known or apparent that the grievance or concern relates to the College’s obligations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g., to provide reasonable accommodations and physical access to students with disabilities), the grievance or concern will be promptly referred to the Associate Dean, Compliance (Disability Coordinator), pursuant to the College’s Disability-Related Grievance Procedure. In such cases, the College will conduct a single investigation pursuant to the applicable policy and procedures.

B. Procedural Differences Based on Status of Involved Parties

When a student is involved in a complaint under the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy (as a complainant and/or respondent), the investigation and appeal procedures outlined below will govern the complaint. This includes situations involving an employee.

However, the following provisions also apply to situations involving employees:

  • The Investigating Officer (as defined in the next section) will consult with Human Resources during the investigation.
  • In situations that do not involve a student (e.g., the complainant and the respondent are both employees), there are no appeal rights and the appeal procedures listed in Section III are inapplicable.

C. Administration

For purposes of these Complaint Resolution Procedures, “Investigating Officer” means the Title IX Coordinator, or individual(s) designated by the Title IX Coordinator, to investigate a particular complaint. The Investigating Officer shall have responsibility for administering these Complaint Resolution Procedures. During the course of an investigation, the Investigating Officer may consult with other College administrators, the College’s attorneys, or other parties as needed.

D. Promptness, Fairness and Impartiality

These procedures provide for prompt, fair, and impartial investigations and resolutions. All College officials involved in the investigation or appeal process shall discharge their obligations under these Complaint Resolution Procedures fairly and impartially. If an involved College official determines that he or she cannot apply these procedures fairly and impartially because of the identity of a complainant, respondent, or witness, or due to any other conflict of interest, another appropriate individual will be designated to administer these procedures.

E. Training

These procedures will be implemented by College officials who receive annual training on the issues related to discrimination, harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and how to conduct an investigation that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

Complaint Investigation and Resolution

**Preliminary Information**

Timing of the Investigation

The College will endeavor to conclude its investigation and resolution of the complaint within thirty (30) calendar days of receiving it, though this timeframe may be extended if necessary based on the circumstances surrounding the complaint. Both the complainant and the respondent will be given periodic updates regarding the status of the investigation. If either the complainant or respondent needs additional time to prepare or to gather their witnesses or information, they shall notify the Investigating Officer in writing explaining how much additional time is needed and why it is needed. The Investigating Officer shall respond to any such request within three (3) days.

Informal Resolution

Informal means of resolution, such as mediation, may be used in lieu of the formal investigation and determination procedure. The following standards apply to any informal resolution method that is utilized:

  • The informal process can only be used with both parties’ voluntary cooperation and appropriate involvement by the institution (e.g., the Title IX Coordinator).
  • The complainant will not be required to “work out” the problem directly with the respondent.
  • Either party may terminate the informal process at any time and elevate the complaint to the formal investigation procedures described below.
  • Informal resolution in the form of mediation, even on a voluntary basis, will not be used to resolve complaints alleging sexual assault.

Interim Measures

At any time during the investigation, the Investigating Officer may determine that interim remedies or protections for the parties involved or witnesses are appropriate. These interim remedies may include separating the parties, placing limitations on contact between the parties, suspension, or making alternative class-placement or workplace arrangements. Failure to comply with the terms of these interim remedies or protections may constitute a separate violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy.

Support Person/Advisor

During the investigation process, both a complainant and a respondent may ask a support person/advisor to accompany him or her at all stages of the process. In cases involving multiple complainants or respondents, the support person/advisor cannot be another complainant or respondent. The support person/advisor does not serve as an advocate on behalf of the complainant or respondent, may not be actively involved in any proceedings, and must agree to maintain the confidentiality of the process. A support person/advisor may be removed if he or she becomes disruptive or does not abide by the limitations discussed in the previous sentence. Additionally, the College is not required to allow a particular support person/advisor to be involved in the process if it would cause undue delay of any meeting with the Investigating Officer. A support person/advisor will be asked to sign an affirmation that he or she understands his or her role in the process.

Pending Criminal Investigation

Some types of conduct falling under the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy may also constitute criminal conduct. In such instances, the complainant is also encouraged to file a report with the appropriate law enforcement authorities and, if requested, the College will assist the complainant in doing so. An ongoing criminal investigation, however, does not relieve the College of its responsibilities under the law. Therefore, to the extent doing so does not interfere with any criminal investigation, the College will proceed with its own investigation and resolution of the complaint.

Rights of the Parties

During the investigation and resolution of a complaint, the complainant and respondent shall have equal rights. They include:

  • Equal opportunity to identify and have considered witnesses and other relevant evidence.
  • Similar access to all information considered by the Investigating Officer.
  • Equal opportunity to review any statements or evidence provided by the other party.
  • Equal access to review and comment upon any information independently developed by the Investigating Officer should the Investigating Officer share such information with the other party.
  • Equal opportunity to appeal determinations pursuant to Section III, below.

Commencement of a Formal Investigation

Once a complaint is made, the Investigating Officer will commence an investigation of it as soon as practicable, but not later than five (5) business days after the complaint is made. The purpose of the investigation is to determine whether it is more likely than not that the alleged behavior occurred and, if so, whether it constitutes a violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy. The Investigating Officer will seek to complete the investigation within ten (10) business days, though this timeframe may be extended if necessary based on the circumstances.

In certain narrow circumstances, the Investigating Officer may commence an investigation even if the complainant requests that the matter not be pursued. In such a circumstance, the Investigating Officer will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the matter in a manner that is informed by the complainant’s articulated concerns

Content of the Investigation

During the investigation, the complainant will have the opportunity to describe his or her allegations and present supporting witnesses or other evidence. The respondent will have the opportunity to respond to the allegations and present supporting witnesses or other evidence. The Investigating Officer will review the statements and evidence presented and may, depending on the circumstances, interview others with relevant knowledge, review documentary materials, and take any other appropriate action to gather and consider information relevant to the complaint. All parties and witnesses involved in the investigation are expected to cooperate and provide complete and truthful information.

Investigation Report

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Investigating Officer will prepare a written report. The written report will explain the scope of the investigation (including witnesses interviewed and evidence considered), identify findings of fact, and state whether any allegations in the complaint were found to be substantiated by a preponderance of the evidence.

Sanctions and Remedial Measures

General

If the written report determines that conduct occurred in violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy, sanctions and remedial measures will be imposed in order to maintain an environment free from discrimination and harassment and to protect the safety and well-being of the complainant and other members of the College Community. Such actions will also include reasonable steps to correct the effects of such conduct on the complainant and others and to prevent the recurrence of discrimination, harassment, sexual misconduct, and/or retaliation.

Types of Sanctions and Remedial Measures

Upon finding that a violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy occurred, the College may impose any combination of the following sanctions depending on aggravating or mitigating circumstances of the case:

  • For students, possible sanctions are: assessment of financial penalties, alterations in registration timing and process, blockage of certain class section choices, parking restrictions, protective orders such as no contact orders, environmental restrictions, suspension, probation or expulsion.
  • For employees, possible sanctions are: assessment of financial penalties, restricted access to campus facilities, parking restrictions, protective orders such as no contact orders, environmental restrictions, corrective actions, or termination.

Examples of other remedial measures include, but are not limited to: providing counseling or other support services, mandated training, and the provision of additional educational programming for the College Community or a segment thereof.

Deciding Sanctions and Remedial Measures

If an employee respondent is found in violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy, sanctions will be determined by the appropriate administrator in collaboration with the Human Resources Department. Such decisions are guided by the Standards of Performance and Conduct.

If a student respondent is found in violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy, sanctions will be determined by the Chief Academic Officer.

If a third-party respondent is found in violation of the Discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct policy, sanctions will be determined by the Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with other College officials as necessary.

In all situations, the individual deciding sanctions may consult with the Title IX Coordinator in determining what, if any, other remedial measures may be appropriate based on the circumstances.

Notifying Parties of the Outcome

The complainant and respondent will be notified of the outcome of the investigation within two (2) business days of the completion of the Investigation Report and decision regarding sanctions. The parties will each be given a copy of the written report and be informed of the sanctions and remedial measures being imposed. In certain circumstances, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) may prohibit particular information about sanctions or remedial measures from being shared with the other party. In such circumstances, adjustments to the notification letters will occur as necessary.

Finality of the Investigation Report & Sanctions and Remedial Measures

The written report of the Investigating Officer, and the sanctions and remedial measures imposed (if applicable), shall be final subject only to the right of appeal set forth in Section III, below.

Special Procedure Concerning Complaints against the President, the Title IX Coordinator, or Other Administrators Ranked Higher than the Title IX Coordinator

If a complaint involves alleged conduct on the part of the College’s President, the College’s Board of Directors (“Board”) will designate the Investigating Officer. Based on the information gathered by the investigation, the Board will prepare and issue the written report determining the complaint and, as necessary, implementing any sanctions or remedial measures. The determination of the Board is final and not subject to appeal.

If a complaint involves alleged conduct on the part of the Title IX Coordinator or any administrator ranked higher than the Title IX Coordinator, the President will designate the Investigating Officer. Based on the information gathered by the investigation, the President will prepare and issue the written report determining the complaint and, as necessary, implementing any sanctions or remedial measures. The determination of the President is final and not subject to appeal.

Appeals

As noted in Section I.B. above, these appeal procedures are only applicable when a student is involved as a complainant and/or respondent.

Grounds for Appeal

The complainant or respondent may appeal the determination of a complaint only on the following grounds:

  • The decision was contrary to the substantial weight of the evidence;
  • There is a substantial likelihood that newly discovered information, not available at the time evidence was presented to the Investigating Officer, would result in a different outcome;
  • Bias or prejudice on the part of the Investigating Officer or the official imposing punishment; or
  • The punishment or corrective action imposed is disproportionate to the offense committed.

Method of Appeal

Appeals must be filed with Carolyn Hunter, Dean of Operation/Presidential Liaison (“Appellate Official”) within five (5) business days of receipt of written notification of the resolution of the complaint. The appeal should be sent via email to Carolyn.Hunter@thechristcollege.edu and must contain the following:

  • Name of the complainant;
  • Name of the respondent;
  • A statement of the resolution of the complaint, including corrective action if any;
  • A detailed statement of the basis for the appeal including the specific facts, circumstances, and argument in support of it; and
  • Requested action, if any.

When an appeal has been filed, the non-appealing party will be notified of such in writing. The appealing party may request a meeting with the Appellate Officer, but the decision to grant a meeting is within the Appellate Officer’s discretion. However, if a meeting is granted, then the other party will be granted a similar opportunity.

Resolution of the Appeal

The Appellate Officer will resolve the appeal within ten (10) business days of receiving it and may take any and all actions that he/she determines to be in the interest of a fair and just decision. The parties will be notified in writing if the Appellate Officer’s decision will take longer than 10 business days. The decision of the Appellate Officer is final. The Appellate Officer shall issue a short and plain, written statement of the resolution of the appeal, including any changes made to the Investigating Officer’s previous written determination and/or the sanctions and remedial measures imposed. The written statement shall be provided to the complainant, respondent, and the Title IX Coordinator within three (3) business days of the resolution.

Documentation

Throughout all stages of the investigation, resolution, and appeal, the Investigating Officer, the Title IX Coordinator, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and the Appellate Officer, as the case may be, are responsible for maintaining documentation of the investigation and appeal, including documentation of all proceedings conducted under these Complaint Resolution Procedures, which may include written findings of fact, transcripts, and audio recordings.

Academic Freedom Statement

While the College is committed to the principles of free inquiry and free expression, discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct are neither legally protected expression nor the proper exercise of academic freedom.

Prevention Education Statement

Because the College recognizes that the prevention of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct is important, it offers educational programming to a variety of groups such as: campus personnel; incoming students and new employees participating in orientation; and members of student organizations. Among other elements, such training will cover relevant definitions, procedures, and sanctions; the role and identity of the Title IX Coordinator; safe and positive options for bystander intervention; and risk reduction information, including recognizing warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks. To learn more about education resources, please contact the Title IX Coordinator.