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2021-2022 College CatalogLast Updated "Academic Information" on September 16, 2021

Academic Information

Department of Health Sciences

Added 8-24-2020

The Department of Health Sciences has two Divisions, Allied Health and Arts and Sciences. The degrees offered within the department are an Associate of Science in General Studies, Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting, and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration.

Purpose

The purpose of the Health Sciences is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences. Students will acquire a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the person, environment, and health. The health science graduate will be a life-long learner who models ethical behavior, integrity, and excellence. Earning a health science degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, graduates will be equipped to participate in the healthcare arena as caring professionals engaging in critical decision making, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration.

Philosophy

A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.

The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities, and institutions. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Health Sciences graduates engage in assessment of both the environment and people to identify opportunities to promote, maintain, or restore health.

Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person, including physical, mental, and social well-being. A person’s state of health is influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and may be affected by prevention and treatment strategies.

Framework

Visual Reference of Health Sciences conceptual framework

Horizontal Threads for Health Sciences

For the Health Sciences, person, environment, and health constitute horizontal threads, which are those integrated concepts presented early, strengthened through repeated exposure and application, and woven throughout the curriculum for Health Science programs.

Vertical Threads for Health Sciences

Caring, intellectual inquiry, ethical behavior, critical decision making, and collaboration comprise the vertical threads. These concepts and skills are arranged to build upon one another in alignment with a general sequence of learning. Scaffolded through the curriculum for Health Science programs, vertical threads guide the student’s progression toward proficiency.

Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where individual choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected.

Intellectual Inquiry is a persistent sense of curiosity that informs both learning and practice, which stimulates visionary thinking. Intellectual inquiry invites the exploration of possibilities, allowing for creativity and innovation.

Ethical Behaviors are characterized by conduct within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks; commitment to standards of professional practice; and accountability for one’s own actions.

Critical Decision Making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate evidence-based conclusions.

Collaboration is working together with open professional communication to plan, make decisions, set goals, and implement strategies. Collaboration requires consideration of need, priorities and preferences, available resources, shared accountability, and mutual respect.

Division of Allied Health Programs

The Division of Allied Health serves to educate health care professionals in the Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (HCA) program. Specific concentration tracks have been developed to assist a student with degree completion utilizing prior education. The concentration tracks for degree completion include Medical Assistant to HCA; Paramedic to HCA; Community Paramedic to HCA; Registered Nurse to HCA; Licensed Practical Nurse to HCA; and BSN and BS in HCA dual degree.

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program provides a course of study that integrates concepts from liberal arts and sciences with a healthcare curriculum emphasizing academic excellence with opportunities for specialization. The promotion of critical decision-making skills, ethical behaviors, and intellectual inquiry along with a business focus prepares graduates with the foundational knowledge needed to enter a dynamic healthcare environment as collaborative, caring leaders. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments. The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program makes it possible for graduates to lead and manage healthcare staff and facilities.

Program Outcomes

  1. Apply theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts and sciences and health sciences to collaborative, caring management approaches based on evidence.
  2. Build collaborative teams that successfully address complex challenges to healthcare.
  3. Demonstrate effective professional, ethical communication, utilizing a variety of modalities, to improve healthcare delivery.
  4. Assess organizational processes to determine opportunities and methods for improvement.
  5. Analyze the impact of health care policy and regulatory mandates on health care management.
  6. Demonstrate leadership roles to manage healthcare organizations.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • 30 Hours of upper-division (300-400 level) courses
  • 50% of major taken through TCCNHS
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
ACCT 210Financial Accounting3
ACCT 220Managerial Accounting3
BUSM 201Principles of Management3
ECO 201Principles of Economics3
FIN 201Principles of Finance3
HCA 101Medical Terminology3
HCA 210Introduction to Integrated Health Care Systems3
HCA 310Transformational Management in Health Care3
HCA 320Information Systems for Evidence-based Management3
HCA330Human Resource Management3
HCA 340Marketing Techniques in Health Care3
HCA 350Financial Management of Health Care Intuitions3
HCA 360Health Care Law3
HCA 390HCA Professional Development1
HCA 410Health Care Policy3
HCA 415Ethical Issues in Health Care3
HCA 420Health Care Quality & Performance Excellence3
HCA 430Health Care Strategic Planning3
HCA 435Social Determinants of Community Health3
HCA 440Economic Applications for Operational Excellence3
HCA 450Administrative Leadership Capstone Project OR
or3
HCA 460HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
ENG 101English Composition3
ENG205Composition for Practical Communication3
or3
COM 315Practical Communication3
COM 101Communication Elective*3
MAT 105College Algebra3
STAT 201Statistics3
SOPS101Introduction to Social Psychology
or3
PSY 101Introduction to Psychology
or3
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation* 12

Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity* 6

Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences* 6

Concentration/Unrestricted Electives* 18-20

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration Concentration Tracks

Students who hold certificates or degrees in the health care fields listed below are eligible to transfer a specific number of credits hours into the HCA program based upon their specific Certificate/Degree. Other certificates or degrees may also qualify. Please call the Admission Office at 513-585-2394 if your certificate or degree is not listed.

Certificates/ DegreesConcentration Transfer CreditMajorTransfer CreditCredits Transferred
Paramedic20 CreditsNone20*
Community Paramedic20 CreditsHCA 101326*
HCA 4353
Medical Assistant20 CreditsHCA 101323*
Radiology Technician20 CreditsHCA 101323*
LPN20 CreditsHCA 101323*
Associate or Diploma RN20 CreditsHCA 101326*
HCA 3203
  • In addition, General Education Requirements and Major Requirements may transfer based on prior courses completed at an accredited institution. A minimum of 30 Major Requirement credits must be completed at the College.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Health Care Administration Dual Degree

Edited 5/9/17

BSN Major Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
NUR 220Health Assessment4
NUR 297Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 221Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety4
NUR 298Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 305Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan6
NUR 307Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry3
NUR 309Professional Nursing Concepts2
NUR 397Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 311Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II6
NUR 312Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery4
NUR 313Concepts in Population Health2
NUR 398Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 410Clinical Intensive6
NUR 412Clinical Intensive6
NUR 497Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 414Clinical Intensive III6
NUR 416Clinical Intensive IV6
NUR 498Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2

HCA Major Requirements

HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
CHEM 105Introduction to Chemistry4
ENG 101English Composition3
ENG 315Evidence-Based Writing3
COM 101Speech & Oral Communication3
MAT 105College Algebra3
STAT 201Statistics3
BIO 111Anatomy & Physiology I4
BIO 112Anatomy & Physiology II4
BIO 121Microbiology4
BIO 180Biology of Food3
BIO 215Core Concepts in Pharmacology3
BIO 300Pathophysiology3
PHI 103Introduction to Ethics3
Humanities Elective*3
PSY 110Lifespan Development3
PSY 210Concepts of Behavior Change3
SOPS 101Introduction to Social Psychology3
or
PSY 101Introduction to Psychology3
or
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3
IS 200Service Learning in Our Community1
FYE 102First Year Experience2

Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours

Graduation Requirements

  • 168 Total credits
  • 50% of each major taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting

The Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting Degree program provides a course of study with a foundation in the Arts and Sciences emphasizing academic excellence, professionalism, and clinical competence. The promotion of critical thinking skills, professional behaviors, and self-directed learning prepares graduates as medical assistants to work collaboratively in dynamic ambulatory health care settings with a diversity of cultures. The completion of the Associate of Applied Science in Medical Assisting Degree makes it possible for graduates to take the Medical Assisting Certification examination and to pursue more advanced educational pathways.

Program Goals

  1. To prepare competent entry-level medical assistant professionals in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains.
  2. To maintain a Medical Assisting program consistent with the guidelines and standards of the Commission for Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), with Ohio statutes and regulations for The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.
  3. To remain up-to-date and current with the changing healthcare industry.
  4. To provide programs and resources for students, college, and community to provide a program that meets the needs of healthcare and the communities that we serve.

Program Outcomes

  1. Perform at competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains.
  2. Demonstrate professional communication while interacting with providers, staff, and patients.
  3. Perform professional administrative and clinical skills in the delivery of quality patient care.
  4. Maintain ethical and legal behavior within the scope of practice for Medical Assistants.
  5. Discuss the value of lifelong learning and continuing education.

Graduation Requirements

  • 60 Total credits
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS

Major Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
MA 100Pharmacology for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MA 102Legal and Ethical Issues for Medical Assisting Professionals2
MA 104Foundations for Clinical for Medical Assisting Professionals4
MA 200Diagnostic Procedures for Medical Assisting Professionals4
MA 202Administrative Procedures for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MA 203Front Office Procedures for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MA 205Medical Coding and Reimbursement Procedures for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MA 207Safety and Emergency Procedures for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MA 209Career Development Capstone for Medical Assisting Professionals5

General Education Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
ENG 101English Composition3
COM 112Professional Communication & Behavior for Medical Assisting Professionals3
MAT 102Quantitative Reasoning3
TECH 101Basic Technology Skills and Applications3
BIO 102Structure and Function of the Body4
HCA 101Medical Terminology3
FYE 102First Year Experience*2
PSY/SOCElective*3
HUMElective*3
Elective*3

*FYE 102 required if the student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours.

*Choose electives to lead to the minimum total of 60 hours required for graduation. Choose from a list of approved courses on the degree audit

Division of Arts and Sciences

Updated 4/16/18

Through engaging students in the Arts and Sciences, the purpose of the Division of Arts and Sciences is to build upon the intellectual, social, and emotional foundation of students by developing a commitment to life-long learning, increasing their social and global consciousness, and their academic and professional competencies, and building on their understanding of what it means to be a knowledgeable and responsible citizen.

The Division of Arts and Sciences delivers the core general education requirements for college and academic programs.

Students completing the Arts and Sciences experience will be able to:

  • Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  • Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Philosophy

The Arts and Sciences curriculum at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences serves to develop within students certain intellectual and cognitive capacities, habits of mind and character, values, moral awareness, integrative abilities in connecting bodies of knowledge, and qualities necessary for productive citizenship in an open and vibrant democracy.

Intellectual and Cognitive Capacities

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is geared to develop in students the capacities for critical thinking, productive and open dialogue, the ability to proactively solve problems and embrace the challenges of the world around them, and a strong internal focus of control so they are creators, not victims of circumstance or fortune.

Habits

The Arts and Sciences curriculum aims to develop habits of diligence, working smart, seeking knowledge, asking and answering questions, and life-long learning. The Arts and Sciences faculty strive to foster study skills, analytical tools for engaging technology in learning, an appreciation for a variety of learning environments and teaching styles, responsibility for students’ own education, habits of collaborative learning and action, and habits of self-reflection and assessment.

Connecting and Integrating

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is designed to enable students to connect and integrate knowledge among the arts and sciences and the health sciences, in the belief that together the arts and sciences provide comprehensive insight into our world and the human condition.

Values and Moral Development

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe education entails moral development and the examination of values, including the development of integrity, the ability to work with others, and to both generously consider and critically examine the thoughts, goals, and values of others as well as one’s own.

Citizenship

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe that becoming keenly aware of and exercising their own intellectual capacities and developing their interests in the subject matter of the arts and sciences enables individuals to live fuller and more fulfilled human lives. Moreover, the development of these capacities and habits are also crucial to producing well-informed and capable citizens who can participate productively in a liberal democracy, with openness and awareness of others outside one’s own world, with an understanding of the past in order to build a fair, opportune, and sustainable future, and with an appreciation of how small our world is and how, through its interconnections, local action affects the global environment.

Program of Study

Associate of Science in General Studies

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Associate of Science General Studies

Added 11/15/16

The Associate of Science degree is intended for students planning to attend a college or university to obtain a bachelor’s degree in a science major or who wish to obtain a 2-year associate degree. The Associate of Science Degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Students may transfer in general education courses or select Arts and Sciences courses at the College to meet the criteria. Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits at TCCNHS.

Program Outcomes

Updated 4/16/18

  1. Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  2. Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  3. Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  4. Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  5. Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Graduation Requirements

General Education Requirements

Oral & Written Communication (9 credit hours)

  • ENG 101 English Composition (3 credits)
  • Oral & Written Communication Electives* (6 credits)

Math & Data Analysis (6 credit hours)

  • MAT 105 College Algebra (3 credits)
  • STAT 201 Statistics (3 credits)

Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation (12 credit hours)

  • Natural Science, Technology, & Innovation Electives* (12 credits)

Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity (3 credit hours)

  • Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity Elective* (3 credits)

Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 credit hours)

  • Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives* (6 credits)

First Year Experience (2 credit hours)

  • FYE 102 First Year Experience (2 credits)

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Unrestricted/Free Elective (22-24 credit hours)*

Choose electives to lead to the minimum total of 60 hours required for graduation. *Choose from approved courses listed on degree audit

  • 60 Total credits
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS

Department of Nursing

The purpose of the Department of Nursing is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the Arts and Sciences. Graduates who earn a nursing degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be caring, professional nurses engaging in critical thinking, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration. Leadership provided by the graduate will promote high quality care for a dynamic, diverse society in any setting. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments and healthcare informatics. The nursing graduate from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be a life-long learner who models integrity and excellence in professional nursing practice.

Philosophy

The faculty within the nursing department at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences believe that:

  1. A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.
  2. The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Ongoing assessment by the nurse identifies a person’s adaptive efforts to promote, maintain, or restore health.
  3. Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person. A person’s state of health may be influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and altered by primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention strategies. A person’s position on the health continuum may require nursing intervention.
  4. Nursing is a caring profession concerned with the patient’s responses to health and illness. Nursing is an integral component of the healthcare system. Nurses function collaboratively to address the diverse healthcare needs of patients. Nurses are providers and managers of care and members within the discipline of nursing.
  5. Nursing practice integrates knowledge from the biological, social, and behavioral sciences with nursing theories, research/evidence, and clinical experience. The application of knowledge, as well as the therapeutic use of self through effective communication and intervention is fundamental to nursing.
  6. The nursing process is a comprehensive clinical decision-making strategy. It serves as a framework for providing and managing competent evidence-based care to promote, maintain, or restore the patient’s optimal level of health. This includes support of a dignified death.
  7. Accountability and responsibility are hallmarks of a wide range of professional behaviors requisite to the discipline of nursing. Nurses are accountable to patients, society, and the nursing profession for providing high standards of care and upholding legal and ethical principles. Nurses are responsible for continuing professional development.
  8. In Nursing, the collaborative processes of teaching and learning take place between the teacher and student. Learning is a goal-oriented, integrative process enhanced by individual inquiry, motivation, and self-direction. Learning is facilitated when faculty creates a cooperative, supportive learning environment, encourages knowledge and skill expansion, and guides students in developing competencies. The achievement of desired changes in knowledge, attitudes, skill and behaviors determines the effectiveness of this collaborative effort.

Framework

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Horizontal Threads

Integrated concepts presented at various stages in the curriculum, strengthened through repeated exposure and application and woven throughout the curriculum. For the Department of Nursing, person, environment, health, and nursing constitute the horizontal threads of the nursing curriculum and are defined in the Philosophy of the Nursing Programs.

Vertical Threads (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

Sequential concepts spanning the nursing program, progressive in complexity and increasing in depth throughout the program. For the Department of Nursing, the following concepts and definitions constitute the vertical threads of the nursing curriculum. The vertical threads are not intended to be viewed as solitary concepts. Rather, the concepts are intended to reflect the progressive educational development of the student in acquiring the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and clinical reasoning requisite to the profession.

  1. Caring Interventions: Caring interventions are those nursing behaviors and actions that assist patients in meeting their needs. Caring interventions are based on a knowledge and understanding of the natural sciences, behavioral sciences, nursing theory, nursing research, and past nursing experiences. Caring is the “being with” and “doing for” that assist patients to achieve the desired results. Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where patient choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected. Caring interventions imply implementation of prevention strategies. (Caring, Quality)
  2. Assessment: Assessment is the collection, analysis, and synthesis of relevant data for the purpose of appraising the patient’s health status. Comprehensive assessment provides a holistic view of the patient which includes dimensions of physical, developmental, emotional, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual, and functional status. Assessment involves the orderly collection of information from multiple sources to establish a foundation for provision of nursing care, and includes identification of available resources to meet patient needs. Initial assessment provides a baseline for future comparisons that can be made in order to individualize patient care. Ongoing assessment and reassessment are required to ensure quality and safety in patient care while meeting the patient’s changing needs. (Nursing Process, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Communication, NCLEX Success)
  3. Clinical Decision Making: Clinical decision-making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate clinical judgments. Effective clinical decision making results in finding solutions, individualizing care, and assuring the delivery of accurate, safe care that moves the patient and support person(s) toward positive outcomes. Evidence-based practice and the use of critical thinking/clinical reasoning provide the foundation for appropriate clinical decision making. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Clinical Judgment, Quality, Evidence-based Practice)
  4. Managing Care: Managing care is the efficient, effective use of human, physical, financial, and technological resources to meet patient needs and support organizational outcomes. Effective management is accomplished through the processes of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The nurse, in collaboration with the healthcare team, uses these processes to assist the patient to move toward positive outcomes in a cost efficient manner, to transition within and across healthcare settings, and to access resources. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Leadership, Collaboration, Healthcare Economics)
  5. Collaboration: Collaboration is the shared planning, decision making, problem solving, goal setting, and assumption of responsibilities by those who work together cooperatively, with open professional communication. Collaboration occurs with the patient, significant support person(s), peers, other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. The nurse participates in the team approach to holistic, patient-centered care across healthcare settings. The nurse functions as advocate, liaison, coordinator, and colleague as participants work together to meet patient needs and move the patient toward positive outcomes. Collaboration requires consideration of patient needs, priorities and preferences, available resources and services, shared accountability, and mutual respect. (Collaboration, Care Coordination, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Leadership, Healthcare Economics)
  6. Communication: Communication in nursing is an interactive process through which there is an exchange of information that may occur verbally, non-verbally, in writing, or through information technology. Those who may be included in this process are the nurse, patient, significant support person(s), other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. Effective communication demonstrates caring, compassion, and cultural awareness, and is directed toward promoting positive outcomes and establishing a trusting relationship. Therapeutic communication is an interactive verbal and non-verbal process between the nurse and patient that assists the patient to cope with change, develop more satisfying interpersonal relationships, and integrate new knowledge and skills. (Communication, Collaboration, Caring, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)
  7. Professional Behaviors: Professional behaviors within nursing practice are characterized by a commitment to the profession of nursing. The graduate of a nursing program adheres to standards of professional practice, is accountable for their own actions and behaviors, and practices nursing within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks. Professional behaviors also include a concern for others, as demonstrated by caring, valuing the profession of nursing, and participating in ongoing professional development. (Ethics, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Law)
  8. Teaching and Learning: Teaching and learning processes are used to promote and maintain health and reduce risks, and are implemented in collaboration with the patient, significant support person(s) and other members of the healthcare team. Teaching encompasses the provision of health education to promote and facilitate informed decision making, achieve positive outcomes, and support self-care activities. Integral components of the teaching process include the transmission of information, evaluation of the response to teaching, and modification of teaching based on identified responses. Learning involves the assimilation of information to expand knowledge and change behavior. (Patient Education, Health Promotion, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)

Human Needs (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

  1. Biological

Oxygenation: Ability to transport air to the lungs and provide life-sustaining oxygen to cells (Acid/Base Balance, Cellular Respiration, Gas Exchange. Perfusion)

Circulation: Ability to transport oxygen and nutrients to cells (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Immunity, Inflammation, Clotting, Homeostasis, Metabolism, Perfusion)

Nutrition: All the processes involved in taking in and utilization of nutrients (Nutrition, Metabolism, Functional Ability, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Caregiving, Palliation, Aging)

Fluid and Electrolyte Balance: Ability to maintain the volume and distribution of body fluids and solutes (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Acid/Base Balance)

Elimination: Ability to excrete waste products (Elimination, Functional Ability, Aging)

Hygiene/Skin Integrity: Practices that are conducive to preservation of health and maintenance of unbroken and healthy skin (Mobility, Tissue Integrity, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Elimination)

Sensory/Comfort and Regulation: Ability to perceive, integrate, control, and respond to internal and external cues (Sensory Perception, Pain, Thermoregulation, Intracranial Regulation, Cellular Regulation, Stress, Infection, Safety, Functional Ability)

Cognition: Mental processes needed for knowing, learning, and understanding (Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Activity: Ability to engage in body movement (Functional Ability, Mobility, Aging)

Safety/Protection: Ability to be protected from actual or potential harm (Safety)

Biophysical Development: Orderly and predictable process of growth and differentiation (Development, Culture, Sexuality, Reproduction)

  1. Psychosocial/Spiritual

Mental Health: Ability to cope with or make the best of changing stresses or stimuli (Anxiety, Coping, Mood & Affect. Addiction, Interpersonal Violence, Psychosis, Aging; Caregiving, Palliation)

Sexuality: The sum of physical, functional, and psychological attributes that are expressed by one’s gender identity and sexual behavior (Sexuality, Reproduction, Development, Aging)

Developmental Tasks: Ability to achieve psychosocial or cognitive skills at certain periods in life (Development, Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Social/Cultural Interaction: Ability to engage in shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people (Culture, Ethics, Caring, Family Dynamics)

Spirituality/Religion: Essence of a person’s being and beliefs about the meaning of life (Spirituality; Palliation)

Programs of Study

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN)

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (ABSN)

Registered Nursing to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (See the Division of Allied Health: Programs of Study section of this Catalog for curriculum)

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program 2019. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN, ABSN, RN-BSN)

Program Outcomes:

  1. Apply appropriate evidence to improve healthcare outcomes.
  2. Utilize healthcare informatics safely and accurately in the delivery of quality care.
  3. Employ critical thinking and clinical reasoning to care for diverse populations.
  4. Lead the healthcare team in solving contemporary issues to improve patient outcomes.
  5. Collaborate with the inter-professional healthcare team to ensure quality and safety.
  6. Demonstrate professionalism in the nursing role.
  7. Apply an understanding of health policy and regulatory environments in patient care.
  8. Pursue life-long learning and service to meet the needs of a dynamic society.

Pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program Description (BSN & ABSN)

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs provide a course of study that has its foundation in the liberal arts and sciences and is an innovative nursing curriculum emphasizing academic excellence and professional leadership through clinical immersion. A distinctive concept-based curriculum integrating service learning prepares students to address the healthcare needs of diverse global communities by promoting population health. Graduates of this program will utilize evidence to promote health and wellness through caring and collaborative strategies incorporating knowledge of regulatory environments, healthcare informatics, and quality improvement. A culture of robust intellectual inquiry will prepare graduates to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination and to pursue life-long learning.

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing

BSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 121 Total credits
  • 50% of coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

CourseCredits
NUR 220Health Assessment4
NUR 297Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 221Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety4
NUR 298Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 305Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan I6
NUR 307Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry3
NUR 309Professional Nursing Concepts2
NUR 397Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 311Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II6
NUR 312Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery4
NUR 313Concepts in Population Health2
NUR 398Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 307Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry3
NUR 309Professional Nursing Concepts2
NUR 397Professional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 410Clinical Intensive I6
NUR 412Clinical Intensive II6
NUR 497Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 414Clinical Intensive III6
NUR 416Clinical Intensive IV6
NUR 498Professional Development Concepts/Capstone2

General Education Requirements

CourseCredits
BIO 111Anatomy & Physiology I4
BIO 112Anatomy & Physiology II4
BIO 121Microbiology4
BIO 180Biology of Food3
BIO 215Core Concepts in Pharmacology3
BIO 300Pathophysiology3
ENG 101English Composition3
ENG 315Evidence-Based Writing3
COM 101Speech & Oral Communication3
MAT 105College Algebra3
STAT 201Statistics3
PHI 103Introduction to Ethics3
PHI 205World Religion3
PSY 110Lifespan Development3
PSY 210Concepts of Behavior Change3
PSY 101Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3
IS 200Service Learning in Our Community1
FYE 102First Year Experience-Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours2
Elective*3

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing

ABSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 70 Total credits
  • 100% of nursing coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

NumberCourse NameCredits
NUR 220AHealth Assessment4
NUR 297AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 221ANursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety4
NUR 298AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 305AHealth & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan6
NUR 307AConcepts of Intellectual Inquiry3
NUR 309AProfessional Nursing Concepts2
NUR 397AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 311AHealth & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan6
NUR 312AConcepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery3
NUR 313AConcepts in Population Health3
NUR 398AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone1
NUR 410AClinical Intensive I6
NUR 412AClinical Intensive II6
NUR 497AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone2
NUR 414AClinical Intensive III6
NUR 416AClinical Intensive IV6
NUR 498AProfessional Development Concepts/Capstone2
Nursing Elective3
BIO 215Core Concepts in Pharmacology3

General Education Pre-Requisites Completed Prior to Starting Nursing Coursework:

NumberCourse NameCredits
BIO 111Anatomy & Physiology I4
BIO 112Anatomy & Physiology II4
BIO 121Microbiology4
BIO 180Biology of Food3

Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Updated 9/20/19

The RN-BSN Program is a completion degree program which builds on a foundation of previous nursing education at the associate degree and diploma levels. The RN-BSN course of study integrates Arts and Sciences with nursing science and theory to promote the advancement of professional nursing practice. The program provides a quality contemporary curriculum emphasizing academic excellence related to current trends and issues in healthcare. Graduates of the RN-BSN program are prepared for leadership roles, career enhancement, and life-long learning to improve healthcare outcomes in a dynamic healthcare environment.

Program Outcomes:

A graduate of the RN-Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree program at TCCNHS will be able to:

  1. Apply appropriate evidence to improve healthcare outcomes.
  2. Utilize healthcare informatics safely and accurately in the delivery of quality care.
  3. Employ critical thinking and clinical reasoning to care for diverse populations.
  4. Lead the healthcare team in solving contemporary issues to improve patient outcomes.
  5. Collaborate with the interprofessional healthcare team to ensure quality and safety.
  6. Demonstrate professionalism in the nursing role.
  7. Apply an understanding of health policy and regulatory environments in patient care.
  8. Pursue life-long learning and service to meet the needs of a dynamic society.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Minimum 36 General Education credits Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Major Requirements
  • General Education Requirements

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Major Requirements

CourseCredits
NUR 320Nursing Informatics3
NUR 335Introduction to Research & EBP3
NUR 350Nursing Theories & Foundational Concepts3
NUR 365Legal & Ethical Issues in Nursing3
NUR 420Health Care Policy3
NUR 435Population Health & Community-based Nursing5
NUR 450Caring for the Older Adult5
NUR 465Nursing Leadership & Management5

41 credit hours awarded for RN licensure

General Education Reqiurements

CourseCredits
ENG 315Evidence-Based Writing3
Electives Oral & Written Communication *6
STAT201Introduction to Statistics3
BIO 300Pathophysiology3
Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation*12
IS 300Wellness & Health Promotion3
Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity*3
Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences*6
Arts & Science Elective (Varies number of accepted transfer credits)

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Course Catalog

Please click here to access the 2021-22 Course Catalog, which includes course descriptions. All courses listed are not offered in a given academic year. For a listing of courses provided for each semester, please review the Courses by Semester in SONIS.

Academic Policies and Procedures

General Notice

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences reserves the right to alter or discontinue any of its programs, fees, policies, or services, and to change any provision or policy in the interest of the College or its students at any point in time. The College also reserves the right to cancel courses and course sections, even after registration has taken place, if there is low enrollment, the unavailability of a qualified faculty person, the lack of a clinical site, or other extenuating circumstances. Every effort will be made to place students in other sections of the same course if this is possible.

As a matter of policy, students at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences are bound by the curriculum in effect. Once accepted, all students without transfer credit exemption status for previously completed college courses must follow the pre-arranged College course schedules. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences may terminate at any time the enrollment of a student whose scholastic standing, performance, health, aptitude, or social conduct does not meet the requirements of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Curricular changes are to be expected in response to rapidly changing regulatory, educational, and/or healthcare environmental factors.

Academic Integrity and Honesty

Updated 3/29/16

In an effort to remain faithful to the College’s core values, especially those of integrity and excellence, it is the expectation that all members of the College community make ongoing efforts to be people of integrity in all learning modalities including classroom, clinical, laboratory, simulation, and online learning so that a culture of integrity can pervade the institution. Academic integrity can be understood as the consistency between the promises that we make and the words that we speak and the actions that we perform.

Please click here to visit the Compliance Bridge Policy Portal and search Academic Integrity and Honesty.

Academic Freedom and Responsibility

Updated 9/18/2017

Academic freedom provides extensive protection for inquiry and speech while recognizing the correlative responsibility to adhere to standards of professional conduct and performance, duty to the institution, and respect for the dignity of colleagues, students and other members of the college community are met.

Please click here to visit the Compliance Bridge Policy Portal and search Academic Freedom and Responsibility.

Distance Education

Updated 5/22/17; 10/15/2016

Online learning or distance education supports the mission of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences to expand the offerings of courses and programs that prepare individuals for the delivery of healthcare and opportunities for life-long learning. Distance education maximizes student access to courses through an electronic-based delivery system, Blackboard Learning Management System.

Please click here to visit the Compliance Bridge Policy Portal and search Verification of Student Identity in Distance Education.

Definitions for Delivery Modalities

Edited 10/5/16

Based on best practices in higher education, and in compliance with federal law and the policies of accrediting agencies, the following definitions are offered to provide clarity about the various delivery modalities used in this College.

Face-to-face: The majority of instructional time is in the classroom but may include up to 50% of online instructional time.

Hybrid: Between 50% and 75% of the instructional time for this course will be online.

Online: Between 75% and 100% of the instructional time for this course will be online. Some face-to-face instruction might be required.

NOTE: Faculty members are permitted to use a variety of delivery modalities and learning activities, including, but not limited to, online delivery, field work, off-site activities, and clinical work. Students should always refer to the syllabus for each course for an explanation of the manner in which a course will be delivered. All syllabi are posted on Blackboard one week prior to the beginning of the semester.

Reference: Ohio Department of Higher Education, Supplement (March 2010). Online Delivery.

Obtained by contacting http://www.ohiohighered.org/academic-program-approval.

Technology Requirements

Added 5/2/16; Revised 5/23/17

Access to and understanding of technology is essential for success in distance education courses. Students must have access to a reliable computer and high-speed internet connection. For more information on course-specific technology requirements, students should reference their course syllabi. For program-specific technology requirements, students should reference their respective program’s handbook, the College website (under Enrollment Steps), and/or “Technology Requirements, Recommendations and Support” in the College Support Services section of this document.

Placement Assessments

Placement assessments may be used by the College to determine a student’s academic readiness to engage in coursework necessary for completion of their chosen academic program.

Detailed information pertaining to placement assessments will be provided to students. Students will be required to complete those placement tests that are consistent with the policies in effect at the time of admission to the College. Such placement tests might vary from program to program. Previous placement test results from other schools will not be accepted.

A fee for administering examinations may be assessed.

Based on placement assessment results, students may be required to enroll in identified coursework or other defined remediation.

Placement assessment results and remediation procedures (coursework or tutorials) will be discussed with the student prior to enrollment in their first semester at the College.

Prerequisite Policy General Statement

  1. Students are expected to take College courses no later than the term they are prescribed. Students are strongly encouraged to refer to program curriculum plans as well as consult with their academic advisor.
  2. Students should work with their academic advisor to determine when courses are offered so as to properly plan their academic curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they understand the course of study once they begin their studies. The College does not assume responsibility for a student who fails to properly register for required courses.
  3. Program specific policies may require prerequisites for progression. See Program specific handbook.
  4. IMPORTANT: The Chief Academic Officer or designee must approve any deviation from this schedule.
  5. For additional information on prerequisites and co-requisites, refer to curriculum and course descriptions in this catalog.

Course Cancellation Policy

The College values quality education while maintaining fiscal responsibility. In order to be financially accountable, course sections with low enrollment will be cancelled and course sections that are not at enrollment capacity will be combined.

Time to Degree for Matriculated Students

Refer to specific Program Handbooks for “Time to Degree” timelines.

Dual Degrees

Added 8/17/17

Students may earn more than one undergraduate degree concurrently from the College. A student who completes all requirements for two or more different degrees will be awarded multiple degrees and will receive multiple diplomas. Students pursuing multiple degrees must follow the stipulations described below:

Second Associate Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 15 credit hours in residence unique to each program.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.
  • Associate and Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently
  • Earn a minimum of 136 credit hours, including a minimum of 76 credit hours in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 164 credit hours, including a minimum of 50% of credit hours for each major in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

In order to declare a second major, a student should meet with his/her advisor and complete the Dual Degree Declaration Form. The advisor will then send the form to the Registrar.

Grading Policy

Classroom Grading

Updated 2/10/17

To successfully complete any course at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, a grade of at least a “C” (2.0) or higher must be achieved. Please note a grade of “D” or lower constitutes a failing grade in either nursing or general education coursework. Assignment of a letter grade constitutes completion of the course and enrollment in the course for the entire period. Students should refer to syllabi for course grading scales.

Letter grades are assigned to the final course grade according to the following:

Letter GradeGrade Point Average
A4
A-3.67
B+3.33
B3
B-2.67
C+2.33
C2
D1
F0

Term and Cumulative Averages

Final course letter grades are converted to quality points in order to compute term and cumulative averages as defined by the Academic Grading Policy.

  • The grades a student received in a course accepted as transfer credit from another institution are not included in the computation of either term or cumulative averages.
  • Term average, computed each term a student is in the program, and is based on final grades achieved in all courses taken during that term.
  • Cumulative average, computed each term, is based on the final grades achieved in all courses required in the program up to that time.

Incomplete Course

An incomplete course is a course in which the student has not completed the required course work by the end of the term.

Criteria:

  1. Course assignments not completed by the end of the term may result in a grade of Incomplete (I). No point grade is assigned to the course. Assignment of the grade of “I” is solely at the discretion of the instructor.
  2. All incomplete coursework must be completed no later than ten (10) business days following the last day of the semester in which the “I” grade was assigned.
  3. Failure to complete all required coursework by the designated time will result in the “I” grade being permanently changed to an “F”.
  4. The “F” is then calculated into the student’s GPA.
  5. Students who have an “I” for a grade do not qualify for Academic Honors.

Assignment of Credit Hours

Edited 10/3/16

Semester credit hour allotment for a course is determined according to the following:

  • Class: 1 clock hour per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Nursing Clinical : 3 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Lab: 2 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Clock hour adjustments are made for eight (8) week courses to equate to credit hours as outlined above.

NOTES:

  • One Clock Hour = 50 minutes
  • A semester terms includes a fifteen (15) week instructional period plus one (1) week of final examinations.
  • An eight (8) week semester including eight (8) instructional weeks including final exams

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences defines clock hour and credit hour as follows:

Clock Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, a clock hour shall be defined as 50 minutes.

Credit Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, one credit hour is earned when a student has successfully completed 750 minutes of instruction within a given semester or term as defined by the institution (1 credit hour = 750 minutes).

It shall further be understood that each credit hour presumes a minimum of an additional two clock hours of work outside of the classroom.

Example: A three (3) credit course consists of three (3) clock hours (150 minutes) each week for a total 2250 minutes for a 15 week semester.

A three (3) credit course also requires that students are given six (6) clock hours of work to be done outside of the classroom or 300 minutes/week of such work. These activities could include writing assignments, reading assignments, working on problem-solving skills such as case studies, viewing videos or PowerPoint presentations, reviewing course material, observing the world around them, etc.

Online Course Example: It will be important to be able to demonstrate that the learning activities in an online course will consume a minimum of 2250 minutes of instructional time in addition to time that students will need to spend in preparation for those learning activities such as reviewing materials, preparing for tests or quizzes, preparing drafts for written assignments, etc.

References:

  1. _Department of Education, Memo GEN11-06 (October 29, 2010). Guidance to Institutions and Accrediting Agencies Regarding a Credit Hour as Defined in the Final Regulations. _Available at http://ifap.ed.gov/dpcletters/GEN1106.html
  2. _The Higher Learning Commission. Commission Policies (November 2011). Policy 3.10(a), Assignment of Credit Hours, page 54. _Available at http://www.ncahlc.org/Policy/commission-policy.html

Dean’s List of Honors

  1. All full-time students (12 semester credit hours) are eligible for Dean’s List of Honors.
  2. At the end of each semester, both the semester and cumulative GPA will be calculated.
  3. Students with a semester average of 3.50-4.00 receive Deans List of Honors.
  4. The Dean’s List of Honors designation is separate from Latin honors at graduation.
  5. Dean’s List of Honors will be noted on official transcripts for the semester the honor was awarded.

Academic Standing

Students are considered to be in good academic standing within the College provided they maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, have finalized any grade of “incomplete” within the specified period of time, and are not in violation of any academic policy such as that of academic integrity and honesty.

Early Alert System

The Early Alert System is designed to alert students if they are in danger of failing a course. The system provides the opportunity for the student and professor to collaborate in order to determine appropriate interventions for the student, engaging the student’s academic advisor as a resource.

If you are in danger of failing a course by week four of an eight-week semester or week seven of a 16-week semester, your professor will send you an email and request to meet with you to identify challenges and discuss actions for moving forward. Your academic advisor will also be notified and can serve as a resource to you for non-academic related obstacles that may be preventing your success in a course. Please take the responsibility to communicate with your professor and advisor, as appropriate, so they can work with you and help you identify resources to support your success in the course. In addition to your professor and advisor, you should consider tutoring, the Writing Center, counseling for personal and financial trouble, and other support to help you be successful in the course.

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation at the end of any semester in which the student has earned a term or cumulative grade point average of less than 2.0.

  1. A student who has been placed on academic probation will be notified via e-mail, student mailbox, and/or US Postal mail. The notification will include a plan outlining the necessary steps to return to good academic standing.
  2. In the event a student on academic probation fails to attain a 2.0 semester and cumulative average for the next semester of attendance, the student will be dismissed from the institution.

Academic Dismissal

Updated 2/16/17

Academic Dismissal refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences whose enrollment has been terminated. Academic dismissal is determined by an Associate Dean or designee and formally approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the institution.

The enrollment of a student may be terminated for any of the following reasons:

  1. Two continuous semesters of a term or cumulative GPA below a 2.0.
  2. Failure of a student to remove self from probation or suspension by the time specified.
  3. Lack of integrity, dishonesty, violation of College policies, behavior considered detrimental to safe and effective patient care (if a nursing student), or other misconduct. (Such behaviors may also invoke probation.)

SPECIAL NOTES: Reinstatement following dismissal or termination is not automatic and must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the College.

Attendance Policy

Revised 7/26/17

A primary objective of the College is the demonstration of student accountability through responsible self-directed behaviors. Consistent attendance offers the most effective opportunity for students to gain command of the concepts and material. Daily attendance, prompt arrival, demonstration of a positive attitude of respect, and cooperation are expected. Classroom attendance is expected. Individual course faculty may establish course policies that consider attendance as a factor in determining course grades. Please refer to program handbooks and course syllabi for specific attendance policies.

Attendance in Hybrid Courses

Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no-show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped for the course. Academic activities in a hybrid nursing course include face-to-face class meetings, posting in a graded discussion board or blog. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.

Attendance in Online Courses

  1. Online attendance is assessed by submission of online academic activities by the published due date and time. All due times reflect Eastern Time Zone.
  2. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.
  3. Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped from the course. Academic activities in an online nursing course include posting in a graded discussion board, a blog post, journal, or written assignment.

NOTE: A separate policy exists for “Dropping Students Who Never Attend Class.” Refer to section on Registrationand Records LINK NEEDED– General Polices in this catalog.

Non-Continuous Enrollment Policy

Revised 1/15/16; 5/8/17

A student who needs to take one (1) semester off from the scheduled coursework outlined in his/her education plan will be considered non-continuously enrolled. Non-continuously enrolled students may take no more than one (1) semester off from scheduled coursework, and return to classes will be contingent upon the space available. Notes: A student must have had at least one grade issued at the College to be eligible for non-continuous enrollment. If a student withdraws from coursework after the drop/add date (and has therefore been assigned a grade), non-continuous enrollment will begin in the following semester of scheduled coursework. If a student needs to take an extended period of time off for medical or catastrophic reasons, s/he should reference the Leave of Absence Policy.

Any student who is non-continuously enrolled must first speak with his/her academic advisor and be responsible for maintaining communication with the academic advisor regarding plans to return to classes. A non-continuously enrolled student must contact his/her academic advisor no later than eight (8) weeks prior to the start of the semester in which s/he plans to return to classes. A student returning from non-continuous enrollment must register for classes after those students who have remained continuously enrolled and followed a normal course progression. A student on non-continuous enrollment must also contact the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences eight (8) weeks prior to his/her return in order to complete any outstanding health or enrollment requirements.

Any student who fails to return from non-continuous enrollment will be automatically withdrawn from the College on the first day of the semester in which s/he is scheduled to return, and s/he must reapply in order to return to the College in a future semester. Non-Continuous Enrollment extensions beyond one semester must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer and Dean of College Support Services.

Illness in the Classroom, Lab and Clinical Settings

Medical Emergency Situation

A. For an emergency health need during scheduled nursing classes or in a clinical facility without emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will either contact the Emergency Medical System (911) to summon emergency assistance for the student, or follow policy for emergencies as outlined in the College Catalog.

B. For an emergency health need during scheduled clinical time in a clinical facility with emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee will assist in transporting the student to the emergency department.

C. The student is responsible for payment of emergency services and any treatment incurred.

Medical Nonemergency Situation in the Classroom, Lab Setting and Clinical Setting

A. Students with a nonemergency health need during class, lab or clinical time must self-identify to the faculty, clinical instructor or designee the nature of the health need. The faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will determine if the student can continue with learning activities.

B. When the student is released from class, lab or clinical, the faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e. preceptor) will assist the student in arranging transportation from the facility if needed.

C. This may count as an absence according to the classroom and clinical attendance policies.

Cadaver and Dissection Policy

Added 3/17/16

The following guidelines are established for the safe dissection of animal hearts and animal tissues along with fresh and embalmed human cadavers. Proper handling, cleaning and disinfection practices are necessary to reduce risks of transmission. The dissection and examination of the tissues are for educational and training purposes only.

A donated human cadaver represents one of the most valuable teaching tools for the study of human anatomy.

  • You are required to treat the cadavers with the respect and consideration due to a living person. The cadavers are to be referred to by their sex or tag number ONLY.
  • No signs of disrespect for the cadaver will be tolerated by any of the faculty.
  • Disrespectful behavior could result in your dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • NO outside visitors or guests are allowed into the lab at any time under any circumstances to view the cadaver.
  • Students will gain access to the cadaver only in the presence of, or through the direction of, faculty members.
  • NO photography of any kind is allowed.
  • Because of this, **no photography or video equipment **– including cell phones – of any kind are allowed in the laboratory. Leave all cell phones at home or turn them off and store in your bag as you enter the laboratory. Failure to comply with this rule can create legal problems for both you and the college and will not be tolerated. Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • Although the cadavers have been dissected prior to the laboratory session, it is the student’s responsibility to maintain the condition of the cadaver during the lab sessions.

This includes handling labels with care and using the wetting solution provided to keep the cadavers moist.

  • Wear gloves at all times when handling the cadavers and dispose of gloves properly. Hands are to be washed/disinfected after gloves are removed.

Other personal protective equipment, such as impervious gowns and face protection, is available for use.

  • Cadaveric material should NOT leave the lab under any circumstance. This includes both solid tissue and fluid waste.

All sharps and other contaminated disposable equipment is to be discarded in sharps containers.

  • Waste material should NEVER be placed down drains or thrown into common trash.
  • If a student is pregnant or intends to become pregnant during the semester, the student must contact either the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Compliance for general education and instructional support services as soon as possible.
  • Environmental Services (513-585-3031) is to be contacted to both deliver and pick-up the biohazard container for proper disposal of tissues.

Final Exam Policy

Added 3/13/2017

It is TCCNHS policy that all final exams will be administered during the specified final exam week on the College Calendar. 8-week courses will administer the final examination during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom. The College is required to provide the calculated number of instructional contact hours as stated in the syllabus. Contact hours are determined based on the definition 1 credit hour = 750 minutes. The College also states in the College Catalog that it provides 15 weeks of instruction and 1 week for final exams.

  1. If a final examination, comprehensive or not, is part of a class requirements, it must be given only during the final examination week according to the final exam schedule. Final examinations administered earlier than the appointed time, either during the prior week or during the final examination week, are not permitted.
  2. The examination schedule does not apply to 8-week courses. Final examinations in these classes are to be given during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom.
  3. Examinations will be held in the regular classroom unless students are otherwise notified. 4. When students have three or more final examinations on the same day, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the last exam or exams scheduled on that day. When students have two final exams scheduled to meet at the same time, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the later course offered that day or week. Such arrangements must be made by the in the tenth week of the semester. Students should make arrangements with the instructor of the affected course and are expected to provide evidence of these situations to qualify for exceptions. 5. Rationale must be provided to the appropriate Associate Dean if a final examination is not being administered.

The Registrar is responsible for scheduling all final examination dates, times, and rooms. The Registrar will post the final exam schedule on Blackboard.

Grade Appeal Policy and Procedures

Updated 6/24/16

The Grade Appeal Policy provides students with an avenue of redress when a final course grade is in question based on a mathematical error or grading that does not coincide with the published grading policy in the course syllabus. The procedures for appealing a final course grade are outlined below.

Procedures

Informal Appeal

A student who believes a final grade is improper should schedule an appointment to discuss this concern with the course instructor (or the Associate Dean in the instructor’s absence) within two (2) business days of the posting of the final course grade. This meeting is a pre-requisite to filing a formal grade appeal. The course instructor is required to make a good faith attempt to meet with a student who has contacted him/her to discuss a concern with a grade within three business days of when the grade was posted. Reasons for delay should be explained and documented. The course instructor should also document the meeting when it occurs.

Formal Appeal

If, after the discussion with the course instructor, a student decides to appeal the final grade, the following are the steps for the formal appeal process:

  1. Within four (4) business days after final grades are posted by the Registrar’s Office, the student will submit written appeal documentation to the Associate Dean of the Department including a statement of the reason for the appeal, previous steps taken with the course instructor to resolve the issue, and evidence supporting the student’s assertion that the grade is improper. To be considered, the grade appeal must claim one or both of the following reasons:

a. The final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus.

b. There is an alleged mathematical error in calculating the final course grade.

It is the student’s responsibility and burden to show that the final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus and/or there is a mathematical error in calculating the final course grade. Students are advised that the professional judgment of course instructors cannot be challenged and appeals made solely on that basis will not be considered.

  1. Upon receiving the written appeal documentation, the Associate Dean will notify the student of receipt of the appeal. The Associate Dean will then determine if the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1. If the appeal has not been timely filed and/or has not been properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the appeal will be dismissed and will not be heard and the student will be notified of such in writing. If the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the student will be notified that the appeal will be reviewed and also provided an explanation of these procedures.

Evidence of difficulties in arranging the initial meeting with the course instructor may be reason for the Associate Dean to forgive the untimely filing of an appeal, so long as the student made efforts to file the appeal in a reasonable amount of time after he or she was able to meet with the course instructor.

  1. The Associate Dean will send the named course instructor a copy of the student’s appeal documents so a response can be submitted. The instructor will be asked to provide appropriate documentation by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day of the request. Documents to be submitted include a description of the grading and evaluation process for the course (including the syllabus if separate), documentation of the informal grade appeal meeting, and any other documentation or rationale deemed important.
  2. The Associate Dean will provide the student with a copy of the course instructor’s response and other documentation provided and allow the student an opportunity to provide any additional information by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day.
  3. Once the course instructor has provided a response and other information and the student has had an opportunity to provide additional information, the Associate Dean will establish an appeals file of all correspondence and materials related to the appeal to be reviewed by the committee as discussed below.
  4. The Associate Dean will then appoint a committee of three (3) faculty members within the department. In constructing the committee, possible conflicts of interest should be considered and addressed.
  5. The Associate Dean will determine with the committee a date for a review of the appeal within two (2) weeks of establishing an appeals file. The appeals file will be provided to the committee at the meeting for review, discussion, and the creation of a written recommendation regarding the grade appeal.
  6. Following the meeting, the committee’s recommendation will be forwarded to the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean will notify the course instructor and the student of the recommendation in writing within one (1) business day.

Upon consideration of the committee’s recommendation, the ultimate decision to change a grade is made by the course instructor. The course instructor should notify the Associate Dean, Program Director, and student of the decision in writing within two (2) business days of receiving the committee’s recommendation. If the grade is to be changed, the Registrar should also be notified. The course instructor’s decision at this stage is final, and there is no further appeal available unless the failing grade has resulted in the student’s academic dismissal from the College.

Final Appeal in Cases Resulting in Dismissal

If a student’s failing grade remains in place following a grade appeal and the failing grade will result in dismissal from the program, the student may make a final appeal to the Chief Academic Officer (CAO) of the College. This appeal should include a short written statement explaining the appeal and attaching all previous appeal documents. This appeal must be filed with the CAO within three (3) business days after receipt of the course instructor’s final decision. The CAO may take any action he/she deems is appropriate under the circumstances of the case and will make a decision within five (5) business days of receiving the appeal, unless circumstances require a lengthier time frame. If the time frame is to be extended, the student and the involved course instructor will be notified in writing. The decision of the CAO is final. Appropriate parties, including the student, will be notified in writing of the CAO’s decision within three (3) business days of the decision being made.

**GRADE APPEAL TIMELINE **

FA2018-2019 Appreal scned needed(tables)