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2018-2019 College CatalogLast Updated "Academic Information" on May 24, 2019

Academic Information

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Department of Health Sciences

Added 11/15/16

The Department of Health Sciences has two Divisions, Allied Health and Arts and Sciences. The degrees offered within the department are an Associate of Science in General Studies and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration.

Purpose

The purpose of the Health Sciences is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences. Students will acquire a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the person, environment and health. The health science graduate will be a life-long learner who models ethical behavior, integrity and excellence. Earning a health science degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, graduates will be equipped to participate in the healthcare arena as caring professionals engaging in critical decision making, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration.

Philosophy

A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.

The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities, and institutions. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Health Sciences graduates engage in assessment of both the environment and people to identify opportunities to promote, maintain, or restore health.

Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person, including physical, mental and social well-being. A person’s state of health is influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and may be affected by prevention and treatment strategies.

Framework

Visual Reference of Health Sciences conceptual framework

Horizontal Threads for Health Sciences

For the Health Sciences, person, environment and_ health_ constitute horizontal threads, which are those integrated concepts presented early, strengthened through repeated exposure and application, and woven throughout the curriculum for Health Science programs.

Vertical Threads for Health Sciences

Caring, intellectual inquiry, ethical behavior, critical decision making, and collaboration comprise the vertical threads. These concepts and skills are arranged to build upon one another in alignment with a general sequence of learning. Scaffolded through the curriculum for Health Science programs, vertical threads guide the student’s progression toward proficiency.

Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where individual choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected.

Intellectual Inquiry is a persistent sense of curiosity that informs both learning and practice, which stimulates visionary thinking. Intellectual inquiry invites the exploration of possibilities, allowing for creativity and innovation.

Ethical Behaviors are characterized by conduct within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks; commitment to standards of professional practice; and accountability for one’s own actions.

Critical Decision Making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate evidence-based conclusions.

Collaboration is working together with open professional communication to plan, make decisions, set goals and implement strategies. Collaboration requires consideration of need, priorities and preferences, available resources, shared accountability, and mutual respect.

Division of Allied Health Programs

The Division of Allied Health serves to educate health care professionals in the Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (HCA) program. Specific concentration tracks have been developed to assist a student with degree completion utilizing prior education. The concentration tracks for degree completion include Medical Assistant to HCA; Paramedic to HCA; Community Paramedic to HCA; Registered Nurse to HCA; Licensed Practical Nurse to HCA; and BSN and BS in HCA dual degree.

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program provides a course of study that integrates concepts from liberal arts and sciences with a healthcare curriculum emphasizing academic excellence with opportunities for specialization. The promotion of critical decision making skills, ethical behaviors and intellectual inquiry along with a business focus prepares graduates with the foundational knowledge needed to enter a dynamic healthcare environment as collaborative, caring leaders. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments. The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration degree program makes it possible for graduates to lead and manage healthcare staff and facilities.

Program Outcomes

  1. Apply theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts and sciences and health sciences to collaborative, caring management approaches based on evidence.
  2. Build collaborative teams that successfully address complex challenges to healthcare.
  3. Demonstrate effective professional, ethical communication, utilizing a variety of modalities, to improve healthcare delivery.
  4. Assess organizational processes to determine opportunities and methods for improvement.
  5. Analyze the impact of health care policy and regulatory mandates on health care management.
  6. Demonstrate leadership roles to manage healthcare organizations.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • 30 Hours of upper division (300-400 level) courses
  • 50% of major taken through TCCNHS
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
ACCT 210 Financial Accounting 3
ACCT 220 Managerial Accounting 3
BUSM 201 Principles of Management 3
ECO 201 Principles of Economics 3
FIN 201 Principles of Finance 3
HCA 101 Medical Terminology 3
HCA 210 Introduction to Integrated Health Care Systems 3
HCA 310 Transformational Management in Health Care 3
HCA 320 Information Systems for Evidence-based Management 3
HCA330 Human Resource Management 3
HCA 340 Marketing Techniques in Health Care 3
HCA 350 Financial Management of Health Care Intuitions 3
HCA 360 Health Care Law 3
HCA 390 HCA Professional Development 1
HCA 410 Health Care Policy 3
HCA 415 Ethical Issues in Health Care 3
HCA 420 Health Care Quality & Performance Excellence 3
HCA 430 Health Care Strategic Planning 3
HCA 435 Social Determinants of Community Health 3
HCA 440 Economic Applications for Operational Excellence 3
HCA 450 Administrative Leadership Capstone Project OR
or 3
HCA 460 HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG205 Composition for Practical Communication 3
or 3
COM 315 Practical Communication 3
COM 101 Communication Elective* 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
SOPS101 Introduction to Social Psychology
or 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation* 12

Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity* 6

Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences* 6

Concentration/Unrestricted Electives* 18-20

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration Concentration Tracks

Students who hold certificates or degrees in the health care fields listed below are eligible to transfer a specific number of credits hours into the HCA program based upon their specific Certificate/Degree. Other certificates or degrees may also qualify. Please call the Admission Office at 513-585-2394 if your certificate or degree is not listed.

Certificates/ Degrees Concentration Transfer Credit Major Transfer Credit Credits Transferred
Paramedic 20 Credits None 20*
Community Paramedic 20 Credits HCA 101 3 26*
HCA 435 3
Medical Assistant 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
Radiology Technician 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
LPN 20 Credits HCA 101 3 23*
Associate or Diploma RN 20 Credits HCA 101 3 26*
HCA 320 3

* In addition, General Education Requirements and Major Requirements may transfer based on prior courses completed at an accredited institution. A minimum of 30 Major Requirement credits must be completed at the College.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Health Care Administration Dual Degree

Edited 5/9/17

BSN Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
NUR 220 Health Assessment 4
NUR 297 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221 Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II 6
NUR 312 Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 4
NUR 313 Concepts in Population Health 2
NUR 398 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410 Clinical Intensive 6
NUR 412 Clinical Intensive 6
NUR 497 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414 Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416 Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2

HCA Major Requirements

HCA Internship

General Education Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
CHEM 105 Introduction to Chemistry 4
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
Humanities Elective* 3
PSY 110 Lifespan Development 3
PSY 210 Concepts of Behavior Change 3
SOPS 101 Introduction to Social Psychology 3
or
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
IS 200 Service Learning in Our Community 1
FYE 102 First Year Experience 2

Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours

Graduation Requirements

  • 168 Total credits
  • 50% of each major taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Division of Arts and Sciences

Updated 4/16/18

Through engaging students in the Arts and Sciences, the purpose of the Division of Arts and Sciences is to build upon the intellectual, social, and emotional foundation of students by developing a commitment to life-long learning, increasing their social and global consciousness, and their academic and professional competencies, and building on their understanding of what it means to be a knowledgeable and responsible citizen.

The Division of Arts and Sciences delivers the core general education requirements for college and academic programs.

Students completing the Arts and Sciences experience will be able to:

  • Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  • Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Philosophy

The Arts and Sciences curriculum at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences serves to develop within students certain intellectual and cognitive capacities, habits of mind and character, values, moral awareness, integrative abilities in connecting bodies of knowledge, and qualities necessary for productive citizenship in an open and vibrant democracy.

Intellectual and Cognitive Capacities

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is geared to develop in students the capacities for critical thinking, productive and open dialogue, the ability to proactively solve problems and embrace the challenges of the world around them, and a strong internal focus of control so they are creators, not victims of circumstance or fortune.

Habits

The Arts and Sciences curriculum aims to develop habits of diligence, working smart, seeking knowledge, asking and answering questions, and life-long learning. The Arts and Sciences faculty strive to foster study skills, analytical tools for engaging technology in learning, an appreciation for a variety of learning environments and teaching styles, responsibility for students’ own education, habits of collaborative learning and action, and habits of self-reflection and assessment.

Connecting and Integrating

The Arts and Sciences curriculum is designed to enable students to connect and integrate knowledge among the arts and sciences and the health sciences, in the belief that together the arts and sciences provide comprehensive insight into our world and the human condition.

Values and Moral Development

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe education entails moral development and the examination of values, including the development of integrity, the ability to work with others, and to both generously consider and critically examine the thoughts, goals, and values of others as well as one’s own.

Citizenship

The Arts and Sciences faculty believe that becoming keenly aware of and exercising their own intellectual capacities and developing their interests in the subject matter of the arts and sciences enables individuals to live fuller and more fulfilled human lives. Moreover, the development of these capacities and habits are also crucial to producing well-informed and capable citizens who can participate productively in a liberal democracy, with openness and awareness of others outside one’s own world, with an understanding of the past in order to build a fair, opportune, and sustainable future, and with appreciation of how small our world is and how, through its interconnections, local action affects the global environment.

Program of Study

Associate of Science in General Studies

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program in fall 2016 through summer 2017. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Associate of Science General Studies

Added 11/15/16

The Associate of Science degree is intended for students planning to attend a college or university to obtain a bachelor’s degree in a science major or who wish to obtain a 2-year associate degree. The Associate of Science Degree requires a minimum of 60 credits. Students may transfer in general education courses or select Arts and Sciences courses at the College to meet the criteria. Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits at TCCNHS.

Program Outcomes

Updated 4/16/18

  1. Apply an expanded knowledge base within one’s chosen profession with the disposition to engage in life-long learning.
  2. Demonstrate responsible engagement with social-political-cultural issues of local, regional, or global significance.
  3. Demonstrate academic and professional competency in written and oral communication.
  4. Demonstrate academic and professional competency within the sciences.
  5. Engage in intellectual inquiry and critical thinking by identifying assumptions, making inferences, marshaling evidence, and giving a coherent account of reasoning.

Graduation Requirements

General Education Requirements

Oral & Written Communication (9 credit hours)

  • ENG 101 English Composition (3 credits)
  • Oral & Written Communication Electives* (6 credits)

Math & Data Analysis (6 credit hours)

  • MAT 105 College Algebra (3 credits)
  • STAT 201 Statistics (3 credits)

Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation (12 credit hours)

  • Natural Science, Technology, & Innovation Electives* (12 credits)

Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity (3 credit hours)

  • Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity Elective* (3 credits)

Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 credit hours)

  • Social & Behavioral Sciences Electives* (6 credits)

First Year Experience (2 credit hours)

  • FYE 102 First Year Experience (2 credits)

Required if student does not transfer at least 15 college credit hours

Unrestricted/Free Elective (22-24 credit hours)*

Choose electives to lead to the minimum total of 60 hours required for graduation. *Choose from approved courses listed on degree audit

  • 60 Total credits
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • 30 Credits must be completed through TCCNHS

Department of Nursing

The purpose of the Department of Nursing is to support the mission, vision, and values of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences by providing a course of study with a foundation in the Arts and Sciences. Graduates who earn a nursing degree from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be caring, professional nurses engaging in critical thinking, intellectual inquiry, and collaboration. Leadership provided by the graduate will promote high quality care for a dynamic, diverse society in any setting. To assist in advocating for patients to achieve positive outcomes, graduates will possess a knowledge base of regulatory environments and healthcare informatics. The nursing graduate from The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences will be a life-long learner who models integrity and excellence in professional nursing practice.

Philosophy

The faculty within the nursing department at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences believe that:

  1. A person is a unique individual having intrinsic value. Each individual has diverse physical, emotional, social, developmental, and spiritual needs in varying degrees of fulfillment and deserves caring interventions. The person and environment are constantly interacting.
  2. The environment includes all internal and external factors affecting and affected by the individual. A part of this dynamic environment is society, which consists of individuals, families, communities. Any change in the environment may require varying degrees of adaptation. Ongoing assessment by the nurse identifies a person’s adaptive efforts to promote, maintain, or restore health.
  3. Health is the dynamic process of balance and harmony within the person. A person’s state of health may be influenced by personal, societal, and cultural variables and altered by primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention strategies. A person’s position on the health continuum may require nursing intervention.
  4. Nursing is a caring profession concerned with the patient’s responses to health and illness. Nursing is an integral component of the healthcare system. Nurses function collaboratively to address the diverse healthcare needs of patients. Nurses are providers and managers of care and members within the discipline of nursing.
  5. Nursing practice integrates knowledge from the biological, social, and behavioral sciences with nursing theories, research/evidence, and clinical experience. The application of knowledge, as well as the therapeutic use of self through effective communication and intervention is fundamental to nursing.
  6. The nursing process is a comprehensive clinical decision-making strategy. It serves as a framework for providing and managing competent evidence-based care to promote, maintain, or restore the patient’s optimal level of health. This includes support of a dignified death.
  7. Accountability and responsibility are hallmarks of a wide range of professional behaviors requisite to the discipline of nursing. Nurses are accountable to patients, society, and the nursing profession for providing high standards of care and upholding legal and ethical principles. Nurses are responsible for continuing professional development.
  8. In Nursing, the collaborative processes of teaching and learning take place between the teacher and student. Learning is a goal-oriented, integrative process enhanced by individual inquiry, motivation, and self-direction. Learning is facilitated when faculty creates a cooperative, supportive learning environment, encourages knowledge and skill expansion, and guides students in developing competencies. The achievement of desired changes in knowledge, attitudes, skill and behaviors determines the effectiveness of this collaborative effort.

Framework

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Horizontal Threads

Integrated concepts presented at various stages in the curriculum, strengthened through repeated exposure and application and woven throughout the curriculum. For the Department of Nursing, person, environment, health, and nursing constitute the horizontal threads of the nursing curriculum and are defined in the Philosophy of the Nursing Programs.

Vertical Threads (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

Sequential concepts spanning the nursing program, progressive in complexity and increasing in depth throughout the program. For the Department of Nursing, the following concepts and definitions constitute the vertical threads of the nursing curriculum. The vertical threads are not intended to be viewed as solitary concepts. Rather, the concepts are intended to reflect the progressive educational development of the student in acquiring the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and clinical reasoning requisite to the profession.

  1. Caring Interventions: Caring interventions are those nursing behaviors and actions that assist patients in meeting their needs. Caring interventions are based on a knowledge and understanding of the natural sciences, behavioral sciences, nursing theory, nursing research, and past nursing experiences. Caring is the “being with” and “doing for” that assist patients to achieve the desired results. Caring behaviors are nurturing, protective, compassionate, and person-centered. Caring creates an environment of hope and trust, where patient choices related to cultural values, beliefs, and lifestyle are respected. Caring interventions imply implementation of prevention strategies. (Caring, Quality)
  2. Assessment: Assessment is the collection, analysis, and synthesis of relevant data for the purpose of appraising the patient’s health status. Comprehensive assessment provides a holistic view of the patient which includes dimensions of physical, developmental, emotional, psychosocial, cultural, spiritual, and functional status. Assessment involves the orderly collection of information from multiple sources to establish a foundation for provision of nursing care, and includes identification of available resources to meet patient needs. Initial assessment provides a baseline for future comparisons that can be made in order to individualize patient care. Ongoing assessment and reassessment are required to ensure quality and safety in patient care while meeting the patient’s changing needs. (Nursing Process, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Communication, NCLEX Success)
  3. Clinical Decision Making: Clinical decision-making encompasses the performance of accurate assessments, the use of multiple methods to access information, and the analysis and integration of knowledge and information to formulate clinical judgments. Effective clinical decision making results in finding solutions, individualizing care, and assuring the delivery of accurate, safe care that moves the patient and support person(s) toward positive outcomes. Evidence-based practice and the use of critical thinking/clinical reasoning provide the foundation for appropriate clinical decision making. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Clinical Judgment, Quality, Evidence-based Practice)
  4. Managing Care: Managing care is the efficient, effective use of human, physical, financial, and technological resources to meet patient needs and support organizational outcomes. Effective management is accomplished through the processes of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. The nurse, in collaboration with the healthcare team, uses these processes to assist the patient to move toward positive outcomes in a cost efficient manner, to transition within and across healthcare settings, and to access resources. (Nursing Process, NCLEX Success, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Leadership, Collaboration, Healthcare Economics)
  5. Collaboration: Collaboration is the shared planning, decision making, problem solving, goal setting, and assumption of responsibilities by those who work together cooperatively, with open professional communication. Collaboration occurs with the patient, significant support person(s), peers, other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. The nurse participates in the team approach to holistic, patient-centered care across healthcare settings. The nurse functions as advocate, liaison, coordinator, and colleague as participants work together to meet patient needs and move the patient toward positive outcomes. Collaboration requires consideration of patient needs, priorities and preferences, available resources and services, shared accountability, and mutual respect. (Collaboration, Care Coordination, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Leadership, Healthcare Economics)
  6. Communication: Communication in nursing is an interactive process through which there is an exchange of information that may occur verbally, non-verbally, in writing, or through information technology. Those who may be included in this process are the nurse, patient, significant support person(s), other members of the healthcare team, and community agencies. Effective communication demonstrates caring, compassion, and cultural awareness, and is directed toward promoting positive outcomes and establishing a trusting relationship. Therapeutic communication is an interactive verbal and non-verbal process between the nurse and patient that assists the patient to cope with change, develop more satisfying interpersonal relationships, and integrate new knowledge and skills. (Communication, Collaboration, Caring, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)
  7. Professional Behaviors: Professional behaviors within nursing practice are characterized by a commitment to the profession of nursing. The graduate of a nursing program adheres to standards of professional practice, is accountable for their own actions and behaviors, and practices nursing within legal, ethical, and regulatory frameworks. Professional behaviors also include a concern for others, as demonstrated by caring, valuing the profession of nursing, and participating in ongoing professional development. (Ethics, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics, Healthcare Policy, Healthcare Law)
  8. Teaching and Learning: Teaching and learning processes are used to promote and maintain health and reduce risks, and are implemented in collaboration with the patient, significant support person(s) and other members of the healthcare team. Teaching encompasses the provision of health education to promote and facilitate informed decision making, achieve positive outcomes, and support self-care activities. Integral components of the teaching process include the transmission of information, evaluation of the response to teaching, and modification of teaching based on identified responses. Learning involves the assimilation of information to expand knowledge and change behavior. (Patient Education, Health Promotion, Nursing Process, Professionalism, Quality, Evidence-based Practice, Informatics)

Human Needs (with Curricular Concepts in Italics)

  1. Biological

Oxygenation: Ability to transport air to the lungs and provide life-sustaining oxygen to cells (Acid/Base Balance, Cellular Respiration, Gas Exchange. Perfusion)

Circulation: Ability to transport oxygen and nutrients to cells (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Immunity, Inflammation, Clotting, Homeostasis, Metabolism, Perfusion)

Nutrition: All the processes involved in taking in and utilization of nutrients (Nutrition, Metabolism, Functional Ability, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Caregiving, Palliation, Aging)

Fluid and Electrolyte Balance: Ability to maintain the volume and distribution of body fluids and solutes (Fluid and Electrolyte Balance, Acid/Base Balance)

Elimination: Ability to excrete waste products (Elimination, Functional Ability, Aging)

Hygiene/Skin Integrity: Practices that are conducive to preservation of health and maintenance of unbroken and healthy skin (Mobility, Tissue Integrity, Sensory Perception, Glucose Regulation, Elimination)

Sensory/Comfort and Regulation: Ability to perceive, integrate, control, and respond to internal and external cues (Sensory Perception, Pain, Thermoregulation, Intracranial Regulation, Cellular Regulation, Stress, Infection, Safety, Functional Ability)

Cognition: Mental processes needed for knowing, learning, and understanding (Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Activity: Ability to engage in body movement (Functional Ability, Mobility, Aging)

Safety/Protection: Ability to be protected from actual or potential harm (Safety)

Biophysical Development: Orderly and predictable process of growth and differentiation (Development, Culture, Sexuality, Reproduction)

  1. Psychosocial/Spiritual

Mental Health: Ability to cope with or make the best of changing stresses or stimuli (Anxiety, Coping, Mood & Affect. Addiction, Interpersonal Violence, Psychosis, Aging; Caregiving, Palliation)

Sexuality: The sum of physical, functional, and psychological attributes that are expressed by one’s gender identity and sexual behavior (Sexuality, Reproduction, Development, Aging)

Developmental Tasks: Ability to achieve psychosocial or cognitive skills at certain periods in life (Development, Cognition, Motivation, Adherence)

Social/Cultural Interaction: Ability to engage in shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people (Culture, Ethics, Caring, Family Dynamics)

Spirituality/Religion: Essence of a person’s being and beliefs about the meaning of life (Spirituality; Palliation)

Programs of Study

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (ADN)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN)

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (ABSN)

Registered Nursing to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-BSN)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (See the Division of Allied Health: Programs of Study section of this Catalog for curriculum)

The requirements for each degree program listed below are effective for those starting this degree program 2019. These requirements will remain in effect for students who do not break enrollment or who do not change degree programs.

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

The Associate of Applied Science in Nursing Program provides a course of study that integrates concepts from Arts and Sciences into a nursing curriculum emphasizing academic excellence and clinical competence. The promotion of critical thinking skills, professional behaviors and self-directed learning prepares graduates as beginning nurse generalists capable of entering practice in a dynamic healthcare environment. The completion of the Associate Degree of Applied Science (ADN) in Nursing makes it possible for graduates to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination and to pursue more advanced educational pathways.

Program Outcomes:

  1. Implement caring interventions in response to the diverse needs and inherent value of a person;
  2. Utilize ongoing assessment to identify a person’s adaptation to internal and external environment change;
  3. Implement prevention strategies in response to individuals’ positions on the health continuum;
  4. Implement the nursing process as a clinical decision-making strategy to provide and manage collaborative care;
  5. Utilize communications, including information technologies, effectively and appropriately;
  6. Demonstrate professional behaviors related to nursing practice;
  7. utilize effective teaching strategies to provide accurate, relevant health instruction designed to achieve identified learning outcomes; and
  8. Actively participate in the learning process to achieve desired changes in knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors.

Graduation Requirements

  • 71 Total credits
  • 16 credit General Ed. Residency requirement
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 100 Concepts for Nursing Practice 1
NUR 106 NCLEX Success Course I 1
NUR 107 NCLEX Success Course II 1
NUR 110 Foundations of Nursing Practice 6
NUR 150 Nursing Management of Client Needs I 8
NUR 206 NCLEX Success Course III 1
NUR 207 NCLEX Success Course IV 1
NUR 211 Nursing Management of Client Needs II 10
NUR 213 Nursing Management of Client Needs III 5
NUR 215 Transition to Professional Nursing 5
NUR 199* LPN to RN Transition Course 3

*NUR 199 is an LPN-RN transition course. Students who qualify for this course will not take NUR100, NUR106, or NUR121.

General Education Requirements

Course Credits
ENG 101 English Composition 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
or
COM 110
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
SOPS101 Introduction to Sociology 3
or
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
Elective* 3

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs (BSN, ABSN, RN-BSN)

Program Outcomes:

  1. Apply appropriate evidence to improve healthcare outcomes.
  2. Utilize healthcare informatics safely and accurately in the delivery of quality care.
  3. Employ critical thinking and clinical reasoning to care for diverse populations.
  4. Lead the healthcare team in solving contemporary issues to improve patient outcomes.
  5. Collaborate with the inter-professional healthcare team to ensure quality and safety.
  6. Demonstrate professionalism in the nursing role.
  7. Apply an understanding of health policy and regulatory environments in patient care.
  8. Pursue life-long learning and service to meet the needs of a dynamic society.

Pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program Description (BSN & ABSN)

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs provide a course of study that has its foundation in the liberal arts and sciences and is an innovative nursing curriculum emphasizing academic excellence and professional leadership through clinical immersion. A distinctive concept-based curriculum integrating service learning prepares students to address the healthcare needs of diverse global communities by promoting population health. Graduates of this program will utilize evidence to promote health and wellness through caring and collaborative strategies incorporating knowledge of regulatory environments, healthcare informatics, and quality improvement. A culture of robust intellectual inquiry will prepare graduates to take the NCLEX-RN licensing examination and to pursue life-long learning.

Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing

BSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 121 Total credits
  • 50% of coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 220 Health Assessment 4
NUR 297 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221 Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan I 6
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311 Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II 6
NUR 312 Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 4
NUR 313 Concepts in Population Health 2
NUR 398 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 307 Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309 Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410 Clinical Intensive I 6
NUR 412 Clinical Intensive II 6
NUR 497 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414 Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416 Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498 Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2

General Education Requirements

Course Credits
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
ENG 101 English Composition 3
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
COM 101 Speech & Oral Communication 3
MAT 105 College Algebra 3
STAT 201 Statistics 3
PHI 103 Introduction to Ethics 3
PHI 205 World Religion 3
PSY 110 Lifespan Development 3
PSY 210 Concepts of Behavior Change 3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
IS 200 Service Learning in Our Community 1
FYE 102 First Year Experience-Required if student does not transfer at least 24 college credit hours 2
Elective* 3

*Choose from a list of approved courses on degree audit

Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing

ABSN Graduation Requirements

Updated 5/3/18

  • 70 Total credits
  • 100% of nursing coursework taken through TCCNHS
  • 2.0 Grade point average
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • NCLEX Review Course Determined by the College
  • Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester

Major Requirements

Number Course Name Credits
NUR 220A Health Assessment 4
NUR 297A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 221A Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety 4
NUR 298A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 305A Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 307A Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry 3
NUR 309A Professional Nursing Concepts 2
NUR 397A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 311A Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan 6
NUR 312A Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery 3
NUR 313A Concepts in Population Health 3
NUR 398A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 1
NUR 410A Clinical Intensive I 6
NUR 412A Clinical Intensive II 6
NUR 497A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
NUR 414A Clinical Intensive III 6
NUR 416A Clinical Intensive IV 6
NUR 498A Professional Development Concepts/Capstone 2
Nursing Elective 3
BIO 215 Core Concepts in Pharmacology 3

General Education Pre-Requisites Completed Prior to Starting Nursing Coursework:

Number Course Name Credits
BIO 111 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 112 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO 121 Microbiology 4
BIO 180 Biology of Food 3

**Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing **

The RN-BSN Program is a completion degree program which builds on a foundation of previous nursing education at the associate degree and diploma levels. The RN-BSN course of study integrates Arts and Sciences with nursing science and theory to promote the advancement of professional nursing practice. The program provides a quality contemporary curriculum emphasizing academic excellence related to current trends and issues in healthcare. Graduates of the RN-BSN program are prepared for leadership roles, career enhancement, and life-long learning to improve healthcare outcomes in a dynamic healthcare environment.

Program Outcomes:

  1. Apply theoretical and empirical knowledge from nursing and Arts and Sciences to provide caring interventions based on evidence.
  2. Apply current and emerging clinical technologies and informatics for ethical, clinical-decision making.
  3. Demonstrate effective professional communication, utilizing a variety of modalities, to improve healthcare outcomes.
  4. Participate in inter-professional, evidence-based quality improvement processes for quality, safe, patient-centered care.
  5. Analyze the impact of healthcare policy and regulatory mandates on healthcare outcomes.
  6. Demonstrate leadership roles to manage care and enhance patient outcomes and the nursing profession based on evidence.
  7. Utilize ongoing, comprehensive assessment to provide culturally sensitive care to individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across the lifespan.
  8. Practice professional nursing from a holistic, legal, and ethical foundation to enhance patient outcomes.
  9. Demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning, professional growth, and advancement of the nursing profession.

Graduation Requirements

  • 120 Total credits
  • Grades of C or higher in all courses
  • Minimum 36 General Education credits Submission of Graduation Application at beginning of final semester
  • Major Requirements
  • General Education Requirements

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Major Requirements

Course Credits
NUR 320 Nursing Informatics 3
NUR 335 Introduction to Research & EBP 3
NUR 350 Nursing Theories & Foundational Concepts 3
NUR 365 Legal & Ethical Issues in Nursing 3
NUR 420 Health Care Policy 3
NUR 435 Population Health & Community-based Nursing 5
NUR 450 Caring for the Older Adult 5
NUR 465 Nursing Leadership & Management 5

41 credit hours awarded for RN licensure

General Education Reqiurements

Course Credits
ENG 315 Evidence-Based Writing 3
Electives Oral & Written Communication * 6
STAT201 Introduction to Statistics 3
BIO 300 Pathophysiology 3
Electives Natural Sciences, Technology, & Innovation* 12
IS 300 Wellness & Health Promotion 3
Elective Arts, Humanities, Culture & Diversity* 3
Electives Social & Behavioral Sciences* 6
Arts & Science Elective (Varies number of accepted transfer credits)

*A student may complete approved courses listed on degree audit at TCCNHS if the student does not have transfer credit meeting the requirement.

Course Descriptions

Updated 11/15/16; 12/20/16; 2/10/17; 2/23/17; 3/7/17; 3/31/17; 5/22/17; 7/26/17; 9/18/17; 9/26/17; 11/13/17; 11/19/17; 12/11/17; 12/21/17; 4/20/18

The course descriptions listed below provide students, faculty, and staff a comprehensive listing. All courses listed are not offered in a given academic year. For a listing of courses provided for each semester, please review the Courses by Semester in SONIS.

Accounting

ACCT 210: Principles of Accounting I: Financial Accounting

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of financial accounting necessary to understand financial statements and provides a practical, real-world method for understanding an organization’s financial statements. Topics include identification, measurement, and reporting of the financial effects of economic events on enterprise.

Co-Requisites: MAT 105

ACCT 220: Principles of Accounting II: Managerial Accounting

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to basic managerial accounting systems, concepts, and principles. Topics include the analysis, interpretation, and reporting of cost data for management’s decision making needs. Cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and performance reporting are discussed as they relate to other business disciplines.

Prerequisites: ACCT 210

Biology

BIO 101: Introductory Biology

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to general biology with emphasis on the human model. Topics covered in the course will include cell structure and function, human evolution, anatomy and physiology, genetics, and the human impact on the environment. This course will acquaint students with the fundamental terms, concepts, and principles of human biology as they relate to the individual, society, and the environment.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 110: A Basic Biological Concepts Tutorial

1 Credit (Lecture)

This one-credit course is intended to run parallel with BIO 111 and BIO 112 and will provide support instruction in underlying biological concepts critical to mastery of Anatomy and Physiology. Through models and other contemporary hands-on modes of instruction, the course will focus on basic biological concepts that are fundamental not only for success in A&P, but also for subsequent nursing instruction.

Co-Requisite: BIO 111

BIO 111: Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

This course is the first phase of a two-semester course designed to provide students with an understanding of the structure and function of human organ systems. A brief review of biological chemistry will be followed by an introduction to cells and tissues. This information will form the basis for the following course content as it relates to the integumentary, osseous (bone), muscular, and nervous systems.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 112: Anatomy and Physiology II

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

BIO 112 continues to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The study of the processes underlying human functioning is also incorporated. The course includes integrated study of the autonomic nervous system, the stress response, special senses, blood, and the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. The course also includes an overview of heredity, development and genetics. Laboratory exercises are designed to complement topics covered in class presentations.

Prerequisite: BIO 111

BIO 113: Anatomy and Physiology through Breath and Movement

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to review foundations of A&P while also learning basic breathing and relaxation techniques and gentle movement routines. The objective of the course is not only to refresh A&P knowledge for students who are currently taking nursing courses and scored less than 50 on the A&P Review Test, but also to provide an opportunity for any student with less than recent A&P instruction to update their knowledge base. Stress management strategies are embedded in the course syllabus to help the student nurse develop healthy habits that can also be shared with future patients. While the A&P review portion of the course will be taught by a faculty member, instruction on breath/movement will be given by a certified yoga instructor. A&P content related to all organ systems will be presented in this review of basic concepts; however, the course will have a special focus on those organ systems that are most impacted by breathing and movement.

Prerequisite: BIO 112

BIO 121: Microbiology

4 Credits (3 Lecture + 1 Lab)

BIO 121 is designed to introduce the student to basic knowledge regarding the morphology and physiology of microorganisms relevant to healthcare settings and the living environment as a whole. While emphasis is on direct microbe-human interaction, discussion will incorporate aspects from the growing awareness of global microbial transfer and the passage of microorganisms from animals to humans (zoonoses). Methods for infection control will include study of the body’s own immune response, the current spectrum of anti-microbial agents in use and public health strategies that incorporate both. Laboratory exercises will enhance and elucidate topics covered in lecture presentations.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 160: Food and Fitness

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

Building upon principles from Human Anatomy and Physiology, this one credit one-line course will prepare students to apply critical thinking and computer-based research skills in assessing their personal food and fitness status. Course modules will advance exploration of contemporary health and wellness issues, by introducing students to Internet and social media resources in order to construct and implement an evidence-based personal food and fitness improvement plan with lifelong benefits. In conclusion, based upon their findings, students will present an informed food and fitness policy recommendation.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 180: Biology of Food

3 Credits (Lecture)

Biology of Food – focuses on nutrition and related physiological concepts as an introductory course intended to provide an overview of core principles in nutrition, including the role of nutrition in health and metabolism of the human body. Essential roles of nutrients and other dietary food components will be discussed, with attention to conditions such as pregnancy and disease. Emphasis is placed on how specific nutritional states affect the function of body systems. It will include basic nutritional assessment and appropriate nutritional therapy interventions.

Prerequisite: None

BIO 211: Introduction to Immunology

3 Credits (Lecture)

Immunology is a dynamic and expansive field of biology. The aim of this course is to introduce students to essential immunological concepts.

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of instructor

BIO 215: Core Concepts in Pharmacology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This introductory course is intended to provide an overview of core principles in pharmacology, including pharmacodynamics as it relates to the fate of drugs when they interact within the human body. It will include a clinical survey of pharmaceuticals by category with a focus on prominently profiled drugs as they pertain to specific organ systems. The course does not assume a strong background in the natural sciences. In this course, prerequisite science knowledge is reviewed prior to presenting core concepts.

Prerequisite: BIO 112

BIO 300: Pathophysiology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on the mechanisms and concepts of selected pathological disturbances to the human body. Emphasis is placed on how the specific pathological condition affects the functioning of the system involved as well as its impact on all other body systems.

Prerequisites: BIO 112

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived.

BIO 310: Epidemiology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is an introductory course that has a focus on the distribution and determinants of health-related issues in specific populations and the use of this study to control public health problems. This course explores cause of disease, transmission, screening, incidence and prevalence of disease and the ethics involved around developing public policies for disease control.

Prerequisite: MAT 105

Co-requisite: STAT 201

Business

BUSM 201: Principles of Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This business foundations course provides an introduction to management theory, functions, principles, values, and techniques. The course includes a discussion of best practices in planning, organizing, influencing through leadership, and exercising control within the organization.

Prerequisite: None

Chemistry

CHEM 105: Introduction to Chemistry

5 Credits (3 Lecture +1Lab)

Course under development.

Communications

COM 101: Speech and Oral Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

Speech and Oral Communication is designed to equip the student to communicate effectively with individuals and before large and small groups. Focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively, without offense, in order to be effective in personal interactions both within the workplace and in one’s personal life, and to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in public, and to prepare and make presentations effectively. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and practice presentations with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Co-requisite: ENG 101

COM 102: Essentials of Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

COM 102 is designed to introduce students to the essentials of both public speaking and interpersonal communication in theory and practice. In the area of public speaking, focus is on communicating clearly and persuasively in order to be competent in making presentations. Students will learn strategies to become comfortable speaking in front of an audience, and to prepare presentations effectively. In the area of interpersonal communication, focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, practice presentations other in-class activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

COM 110: Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to introduce students to theory and practice in interpersonal (one-on-one) communication. Focus is on the development of communication competence. Students will learn to understand, acquire, change, develop and/or improve interpersonal skills. Learning experiences will include reading, lecture, discussion, and classroom activities with self-critique and feedback from other students and the instructor.

Corequisite: ENG 101

COM 315: Practical Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an applied view of communication, its scope and importance in practice, particularly in the business context, and the role of communication in establishing external and internal working relationships. As a practical communication class, students will learn how to design effective messages for diverse audiences and how to present that information in a credible and convincing way, both written and oral, from concept to delivery. This course presents communication as integral to management strategy and as a critical component for success in the workplace.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Economics

ECO 201: Principles of Economics

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the terminology and analytic principles used in micro- and macro-economics, including the application of these conceptual tools to several policy issues. The microeconomic theories presented include economics of the firm and pricing by supply/demand analysis. Topics also cover consumer behavior, market structure, prices, and distribution and determination of wealth and income. The macroeconomic content discusses variables that impact the business cycle such as interest rates, inflation and employment. The application of economic principles emphasizes decision making in a business context.

Prerequisite: STAT 201

English

ENG 101: English Composition

3 Credits (Lecture)

English Composition 101 fosters development of critical reading, writing and thinking skills that are important to academic and professional success and satisfaction. Through reading, discussing and writing about rich and complex texts (mainly nonfiction prose), students will learn how critical reading, open and unbiased discussion, and effective writing are closely interrelated skills, strengthening each and experiencing the value of each for the other. Students will become more perceptive readers and more articulate and aware thinkers and writers, able to apply these strengths in any academic or professional situation. Students will participate in conversations about texts, ideas and writing projects to foster critical thinking and effective expression. Students will learn and practice all the stages of an effective writing process and will become able to write high-quality papers that follow the conventions and meet the logical and stylistic expectations of formal academic and professional prose.

Prerequisite: None

ENG 201: Survey of American Literature I: Beginnings to 1865

3 Credits (Lecture)

Survey of American Literature will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from colonial beginnings through the Civil War. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 202: Survey of American Literature II: 1865 to the Present

3 Credits (Lecture)

Survey of American Literature II will familiarize the student with major authors, texts, themes, techniques and movements of the literature of the United States from the post-Civil War period to the present. Works of literature and literary movements will be considered both as manifestations of broad cultural, philosophical and artistic streams running through Western civilization, and as expressions of distinctively American attitudes and perspectives. Students will receive an orientation to American literary history as well as intensive practice and guidance in comprehending and interpreting rich works of literature. As a survey of American literature, the course will emphasize ways the literature reflects and informs American experience, but will also provide an opportunity for the student to experience and reflect on essential functions of works of literature in general, as lenses on the existential situation and psychology of individual human beings and as insightful reflections of social realities.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 205: Composition for Practical Communication

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to expand on knowledge gained in ENG 101. While continuing to investigate methods of effective writing, the course will focus on a business-specific context. Students will improve their abilities to research and analyze complex ideas, to appreciate and develop the skill of effective rhetoric, and to write clear, grammatical, well-structured communications. They will learn to regard effective business writing in terms of a series of strategic choices, including choosing from among a repertoire of tones and styles appropriate in different situations and with different audiences. Students will also improve their editing and critiquing skills, so that they can distinguish effective from ineffective writing and become better writers in a business context.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 210: Introduction to Poetry

3 Credits (Lecture)

Introduction to Poetry provides a survey of the formal elements of poetry and practice in reading poems. Students will tackle poems of all levels of difficulty and sophistication together, carefully and deliberately, through reading assignments, class discussion and activities, and guidance from the instructor. Students will gradually learn the techniques and features of poetry and become able to comprehend and analyze classic and contemporary poems with increasing confidence. The course enables students to understand the insight poetic expression provides into human life and to appreciate the experience of poetry at the elemental level of sound and musical effects. The reading load is light, with class activities focused on clarifying and deepening student understanding of assigned readings. The course is designed to satisfy general education and humanities requirements in-house or when transferred to other institutions.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 231: Literature and Medicine

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

This course provides an opportunity for nursing and health sciences majors to gain insight into the human experience of illness, health and healthcare. In addition to symptoms and needs related to physical illness, all patients also have stories (as do healthcare practitioners as well), and the power of literature reveals dimensions of the experience of disease, healing and death that can help healthcare practitioners develop empathy and insight into patients and themselves, better enabling them to provide care that is effective and humanly satisfying for both care receiver and care giver. In this course students will read and discuss stories, poems, plays and essays by and about doctors, nurses and patients. There will be regular participation in class discussion and online discussion boards, and one paper.

Prerequisite: None

ENG 315: Advanced Composition: Evidence-Based Writing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with training and practice in writing for bachelor-level study and professional practice. Students will practice improved composition strategies in revision and editing appropriate to proficient and polished communication. This course prepares students for current academic responsibilities and establishes a foundation for future academic and professional excellence in communication.

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Fine Arts

FA 101: Humanities through the Arts

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the humanities through the lens of the “arts.” To achieve this goal, students will study the visual arts in a historical framework ranging from the Paleolithic to the early 20th century. As students examine the arts, they also will explore how we can “read” them. This means that they will both learn and master a specialized vocabulary to discuss the works as well as develop the ability to discern the values of the culture(s)/artist(s) that produced the arts.

Prerequisite: None

Finance

FIN 201: Principles of Finance

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to provide a basic foundation in the concepts, principles and functions of finance. Topics include the role of finance in business; financial statements, taxes, and cash flows; time value of money; stock and bond valuation; financial analysis and risk; and capital investment analysis and budgeting techniques.

Prerequisite: STAT 201

Co-Requisite: ACCT 220

First Year Experiece

FYE 102: Learning Foundations

2 Credits (2 Lecture)

Learning Foundations will provide an arena where students can establish effective partnerships with faculty, administrators, staff, and other students. The course provides co-curricular programs that engage the student to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the college’s mission of lifelong learning and provides an exciting and challenging environment that promotes academic excellence and personal growth.

Prerequisite: None

FYE 110: Skills for Computer Literacy

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

Skills for Computer Literacy will provide students with knowledge and skills to access and utilize basic computer technology. Students will gain competencies in computer terminology, personal computer skills, effective web usage and office products, with emphasis on technology used at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Prerequisite: None

General Study

GEN 099: SmartPrep

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

This course will provide students an opportunity to strengthen reading, math, science, and/or English knowledge and skills identified on the TEAS test. A generated personalized study plan will include modules with associated learning activities. Reflection activities will increase awareness of personal learning needs and foster growth.

Health Sciences

HCA 101: Medical Terminology

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides a foundation for understanding the origin, form and meaning for the vocabulary of healthcare. This includes the prefixes, suffixes and word roots used in the field of medicine. Topics include medical vocabulary and terms related to anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and medical treatments.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 210: Introduction to Integrated Health Care Delivery Systems

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course explores all the major health professions, with emphasis on the U.S. healthcare delivery system. Students will be introduced to the concepts of managed care, health care financing, reimbursement, insurance coverage, Medicare, Medicaid, and the impact of new technology on healthcare services. Students will also research healthcare careers and how the various providers work together to administer health care.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 305: Health Care Non-Profits

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to expand students understanding and knowledge of Healthcare Administration beyond the hospital and private practice settings. It will offer a broad overview of the management challenges of the non-profit sector, and specifically those affecting nonprofit healthcare organizations. It will examine the roles and purposes of various healthcare nonprofit organizations. The course will also cover the structures of nonprofits and some of the budgetary principles key to the success of a nonprofit organization.

HCA 310: Transformational Management in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course examines the structure of healthcare organizations and their management. Through a foundation in management theory and applied studies, students will understand the healthcare workplace and roles within it. Emphasis is placed upon the changes in healthcare delivery models and the implications for organizational structure and the management of people and services.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 320: Information Systems for Evidence-based Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This is an introductory course in the field of Health Information Management (HIM). Topics include: Electronic Health Records (EHRs); general healthcare computer systems; common software applications; system selection and implementation; data quality, storage and retrieval; security and privacy; and other essential topics. This course focuses on how these systems and issues affect health care delivery and the use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) models.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 330: Human Resource Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an introduction of human resource management in the healthcare setting. The course explores the practical knowledge needed for the roles and functions of the human resource department. The focus is to deliver skills and knowledge to healthcare administrators related to: Equal Employment Opportunity, staffing, assessment and evaluation; development of personnel policies; training; benefits; and safety and health in the workplace.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 340: Marketing Techniques in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course covers the fundamental marketing topics such as market research, strategy, and the strategic marking process. Students will learn how to effectively apply marketing principles, develop marketing strategies, and conduct analyses in a health care setting. Marketing principles will be explored through practical, hands-on application in the healthcare industry.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 350: Financial Management of Health Care Institutions

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course applies the concepts of financial management within health care organizations. It examines how organizations are financed, both from external as well as internal sources. Topics include financial planning principles, reimbursement procedures, and governmental regulation and legal restraints.

Prerequisite: FIN 201, HCA 210

HCA 360: Health Care Law

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course is an overview of health law issues. Court cases, state and federal statues, and common-law principles are used to help students understand the practical application of the concepts learned. Government regulation topics including legal constraints, liability, negligence, patient rights, confidentiality, and corporate/administrative responsibility are examined.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 365: Consumer Engagement in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

There is an emerging consensus that informed and engaged consumers have a vital role to play in reducing costs, improving quality of care and thereby improving health outcomes.With this end in mind, this course will explore the current research in practices and interventions aimed at improving consumer engagement. Students will evaluate the evidence and will adapt a proven strategy for proposed implementation.

Prerequisite: None

HCA 390: HCA Professional Development

1 Credit (Lecture)

In HCA 390 students will apply the knowledge and skills gained in the HCA major to prepare for the culminating HCA 450 Administrative Leadership Capstone Course, or HCA 460 Internship, and a career in health care administration. Topics include: Laying a Foundation for Success; Building and Maintaining a Forward-Moving Career; and Identifying and Seeking Career Opportunities. Students will also explore HCA professional societies and learn the value of networking, continuing education and life-long professional development.

Pre-requisites: HCA 310, HCA 340, HCA 350, and HCA 360

Co-Requisite: HCA 320, HCA 330

HCA 410: Health Care Policy

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course describes the current structure of the American healthcare system at federal and state levels and examines the role of historical and political contexts to current policies and institutional structures. Federal organizations such as CMS, ONC, HRSA, and their relationship to state institutions such as Medicaid and public health are examined. Healthcare policies, including the Affordable Care Act and payment reform are appraised within the framework of public and private stakeholders including providers, payers, trade organizations and public agencies.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 415: Ethical Issues in Health Care

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course investigates the ethical principles that apply to businesses and other organizations that are connected to the healthcare field. Students will strengthen their ethics knowledge base and relate ethics to patient issues across the lifespan, ethics within organization, and issues of ethics in broader cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 420: Health Care Quality and Performance Excellence

3 Credits (Lecture)

Acquaint students with the principles of quality assessment, health status, and how to improve value in health care under policies supporting continuous quality improvement. This includes two components: clinical improvements and process improvements.

Prerequisite: HCA 310, HCA 350

Co-Requisite: HCA 320, HCA 330

HCA 425: Project Management

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces students to the mechanics and obstacles of project management. Successful project managers exemplify skills needed to manage their teams, schedules, risks, and resources to produce a desired outcome. Students are given the opportunity to acquire these needed skills with a hands-on approach to learning. This course focuses on the development, execution, and control of projects that will support organizational objectives that can be measured for success. The course also challenges students to consider how failures can be anticipated and averted.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201

HCA 430: Health Care Strategic Planning

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course introduces concepts of strategic planning and management of healthcare systems as an essential part of healthcare administration. Concepts throughout the course include modern business approaches to strategy, involvement of stakeholders in decision making, and issues facing dynamic healthcare environments.

Prerequisite: HCA 310, HCA 320, HCA 330, HCA 340, HCA 350

HCA 435 Social Determinants of Community Health

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the science and art of maintaining, protecting, and improving the health of people through organized community efforts within the public health context. Students will develop an understanding of historical and theoretical foundations of community health and major societal health concerns, and will explore the ways communities are affected by and affect health.

Prerequisite: HCA 210

HCA 440: Economic Applications of Operational Excellence

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides an introduction to the study of health care economics. HCA 440 will cover the basic economic concepts important to the field of health economics and learn why health is different from other goods and services. The course will focus on the historical evolution of health care markets, current legislative changes and public policy implications. Topics include the definition and determinants of health, socioeconomic status and inequality, demand for health care, health care provision, technology and pharmaceuticals, private and public insurance, and health and the labor market.

Prerequisite: ECO 201

HCA 445: Leadership for Health Care Administrators

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on developing and understanding leadership skills and concepts. Students explore a variety of theories related to leadership, management, and change. Analysis of leadership styles, behaviors, and communication techniques assists with the development of skills necessary to lead within a healthcare system.

Prerequisite: BUSM 201, HCA 210

HCA 450: Administrative Leadership Capstone Project

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to provide a “real-world” application of the student’s classroom experience, with focus on transition to health care administrator as a professional. Through a culminating project, students will apply their knowledge and skills in management, reimbursement, financing and the nature of health care. Students will practice creating a collaborative environment that will support various providers working together to administer health care. Students will also revisit and refine their personal career plan.

Prerequisite: HCA 390, HCA 410, HCA 420

HCA 460: Health Care Administration Internship

3 Credits (Field Work)

Students in this Internship opportunity will gain invaluable hands-on experience in the health care field. This is a student-driven endeavor that is assisted by faculty consultation. The focus of this internship is to foster the development of professional skills needed in preparing students for the workforce.

Prerequisite: HCA 390, HCA 410, HCA 420

Humanities

HUM 101: Collaborative Inquiry Foundations Seminar

3 Credits (Lecture)

The course engages students in the reading and discussion of short, accessible, culturally important selections from classic and contemporary works in the humanities that raise enduringly fascinating questions, such as the individual’s identity and relation to the community, the means of individual and group empowerment, the sources of authority, differences and similarities among people, and the possibilities of shared collaborative enterprises—in other words, how human society works and how we can more powerfully contribute our share in cooperation with others. In a seminar format, with short texts at the center of discussion, students learn to more clearly formulate and express their ideas, and in the process, they learn to speak and listen responsibly and respectfully to others. Students investigate their individual assumptions and presuppositions and compare and contrast them with other ideas articulated in class or by the author, thereby learning to read more closely and comprehend more accurately. Gradually, students assume greater responsibility for their own learning, even sharing in leadership of discussions. Students grow individually and as a group through a series of engaging learning experiences that systematically foster respect, creative thinking and problem solving, and a genuine sense of connection through a shared focus on important concepts.

Prerequisite: None

HUM 280: People and Their Food

3 Credits (Lecture)

Eating is something we do every day, but do you really pay attention to what you are eating or why you make the food choices that you do? In this course, we will take an investigative look into global and local food availability, accessibility, utilization, and stability through a critical food lens. We will examine our personal food choices, food habits, and traditions compared to others and how our food choices impact food production, food markets, and our health. We will explore shifting trends and multiple perspectives on agrifood production and critically analyze the effects of this production on our personal health and the environment.

Prerequisite: None.

Interdisciplinary

IS 200: Service Learning in Our Community

1 Credit Hour (Lecture)

Service Learning in Our Community - is an interdisciplinary/inter-professional course in which the student is introduced to service learning. In this course, students will have the opportunity to interact with diverse populations while contributing to the community through hands-on service activities. Ongoing student reflection will focus on how the various service activities contributed toward the meeting of course outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Pre-requisites: None

IS 201: The Roles of Women in Society

3 Credits (Lecture)

The purpose of this course is to explore the lives of women in past and contemporary cultures, focusing especially on the themes of domestic roles, workplace roles, image roles, violence roles, and even how women are and have been defined.

Prerequisite: None

IS 300: Wellness and Health Promotion

3 Credits (Lecture)

In this course, we will discuss wellness and health promotion for all people, and we must begin with an appreciative curiosity about the differences in people. Establishing an understanding about how individual’s perceptions of wellness are influenced by values and beliefs, will enable you to assist individuals, families, and communities to recognize the significance of health and wellness. We will also discuss alternative theories of health and wellness. We will explore holistic care, nutrition, activity and exercise, stress and coping, and preventative medicine as strategies to promote health and wellness.

Prerequisites: SOPS 101 or equivalent. SOPS 105 and PSY 210 or equivalents are recommended.

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived.

Mathematics

MAT 105: College Algebra

3 Credits (3 Lecture)

MAT 105 is designed to study the basic concepts of arithmetic and algebra, the real numbers, linear equations, inequalities, quadratic equations, graphing, rational expressions, functions, exponents, radicals, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and systems of linear equations.

Prerequisite: None

Nursing

NUR 091: Health Assessment RM

3 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 091 assists students in remediation of content areas of health assessment in need of strengthening. This course will focus on health assessment, study and test taking strategies, and time and stress management.

Pre-requisite: NUR 220

Co-requisite: None

NUR 092: Health and Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan RM

3 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 092 assists students in remediation of content areas of health and illness across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in need of strengthening. This course will focus health and illness across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems, study and test taking strategies, and time and stress management.

Pre-requisite: NUR 305

Co-requisite: None

NUR 100: Concepts for Nursing Practice

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 100 introduces the student to the basic concepts appropriate to nursing practice. These concepts include caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, the teaching-learning process and the roles and behavior of the professional nurse. The nursing process is introduced as a comprehensive clinical decision-making strategy, as well as a framework for providing and managing competent best practices and evidence-based care to promote, maintain, or restore the client’s optimal level of health. Nursing’s metaparadigm and the biological, psychosocial, and spiritual/religious dimensions of human needs are defined and analyzed.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT 105

NUR 106: NCLEX Success Course I

1 Credit

Nursing 106 is designed to provide the student with the structure and content of the NCLEX-RN® examination including the test blueprint. The intent and schematic of the series of NCLEX Success Courses will be explained. Strategies for testing success in studying for and taking NCLEX type exams will be covered.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 100, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT 105

NUR 107: NCLEX Success Course II

1 Credit

Nursing 107 requires the student to apply the strategies learned in the previous NCLEX Success Course in formal and informal testing situations. The course culminates in analyzing standardized test results with the course faculty and designing and incorporating individual strategies for NCLEX Success.

Prerequisite: NUR 100, NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT105, NUR 199 if applicable

Co-requisite: NUR 150

NUR 110: Nursing Health Assessment

2 Credits (1 lecture + 1 lab)

Nursing 110 provides the student with knowledge of the concepts necessary to perform a comprehensive health history and health assessment of individual clients across the lifespan. To facilitate acquisition of knowledge and concepts, the course incorporates biophysical, psychosocial and spiritual growth and development into the dimensions of health assessment. Emphasis is placed on the normal age-related findings of assessment as well as appropriate developmental tasks. Human needs are used as an organizing framework.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 100, and NUR 121, MAT 105, NUR 199 if applicable

NUR 121: Foundations of Nursing Practice

6 Credits (4 lecture + 2 clinical)

Nursing 121 provides the student with the fundamental competencies, skills, and techniques of nursing practice. Caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, the teaching learning process, best practices, and evidenced-based care, as well as scientific rationale and pharmacological considerations, provide the basis for applying clinical nursing therapeutics and prevention strategies to meet the unique biological and psychosocial needs of the client. The roles of the nurse and application of the nursing process as the framework for clinical experiences focus on assisting the adult client to meet acute and long-term healthcare needs and reinforce the application of theory content to practice settings. A skills laboratory practicum, in conjunction with clinical experiences with adult medical-surgical clients in acute care settings, reinforces the application of theory content to practice settings.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 100, MAT 105

NUR 150: Nursing Management of Client Needs I

8 Credits (5 lecture + 3 clinical)

Nursing 150 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing care for adult clients in medical-surgical settings. Utilizing the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework, students apply primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client’s position on the health continuum. Content focuses on the nursing management of clients with needs related to safety and protection, activity, nutrition, elimination, regulation, oxygenation, circulation, cognition, and sensation. Emphasis is also placed on the care of the client with needs related to the surgical experience.

Clinical experiences focus on the acute care health needs of adult clients and emphasize the use of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors as the clinical competencies required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs.

Prerequisite: NUR 100, NUR 106, NUR 110, and NUR 121, MAT105, NUR 199 if applicable

Co-requisite: NUR 107

NUR 199: LPN to RN Transition Course

3 Credits

Nursing 199 is a three credit course designed to enable the student to explore integrative concepts in nursing and to assist the student in the transition from license practical nurse to registered nurse. Students refine and update previous learning in addition to identifying goals for successful transition to the registered nursing program. Combined with classroom, on line, and nursing laboratory experiences, the student learns through the application of concepts. The student will demonstrate the ability to solve problems through the use of the nursing process with a focus on client assessment and to communicate more effectively.

Prerequisite: None

Co-requisite: NUR110

NUR 206: NCLEX Success Course III

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 206 continues to foster the student test taking techniques and remediation strategies as preparation for the NCLEX-RN® examination. A series of standardized tests as well as other indicators provides the student with additional information to revise or strengthen the student’s remediation plan. This is also the time to begin or continue to discuss how to facilitate the positive mental attitude requisite to NCLEX success.

Prerequisite: NUR107, NUR150

Co-requisite: NUR 211

NUR 207: NCLEX Success Course IV

1 Credit (Lecture)

Nursing 207 prepares the graduating student with the tools requisite for success on the NCLEX-RN® examination. This course is designed to review with the student’s assigned NCLEX Coach the updated status of a student’s indicators, analyze areas of needed remediation, and design strategies for success.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 215

NUR 211: Nursing Management of Client Needs II

10 Credits (5 lecture + 5 clinical)

Nursing 211 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of adult client with complex, multi-system medical-surgical needs. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on the nursing management of complex health needs related to the client and family experiencing disorders of mental health, nutrition, elimination, cognition, oxygenation and circulation including medical emergencies.

Clinical experiences focus on the acute care health needs of adult clients and emphasize the clinical competencies of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, students apply primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client‘s position on the health continuum.

Prerequisite: NUR 107, NUR 150, BIO 112, BIO 121, ENG 101

Co-requisite: NUR 206

NUR 213: Nursing Management of Client Needs III

5 Credits (3.3 lecture + 1.7 clinical in an eight (8) week session)

Nursing 213 is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of specialized groups of clients with multidimensional needs in a variety of settings. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on the nursing management of the bio/psycho/social healthcare needs of the client and family during pregnancy, reproductive health needs, and birth and of the child along the health-illness continuum.

Clinical experiences include maternal-child and emphasize the clinical competencies of caring interventions, assessment, collaboration, managing care, communication, teaching/learning, and professional behaviors required to assist the client in meeting or adapting to changing healthcare needs. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, students apply primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in response to the client’s position on the health continuum.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 207

NUR 215: Transition to Professional Nursing

5 Credits (2 lecture + 3 clinical in an eight (8) week session)

Transition to Professional Nursing - is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors requisite to providing and managing the care of a group of clients in a variety of settings. The student gains additional proficiency with the nursing process, complex nursing skills, and therapeutic nursing interventions, thereby expanding upon principles learned in previous nursing courses. Content focuses on manager of care concepts, transition into entry level practice, and concept of professionalism. Clinical is a preceptor based experience caring for clients in a variety of settings across the life span. Applying the nursing process as a clinical decision-making framework and utilizing critical thinking skills, the students focus on caring for a group of clients integrating collaboration, communication with health care team members, and the application of theoretical healthcare concepts.

Prerequisite: NUR 206, NUR 211

Co-requisite: NUR 207

NUR 216: Introduction to Perioperative Nursing Care

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts of perioperative nursing to senior nursing students promoting advanced knowledge into the highly specialized area of practice. The objective of this learning is to enhance the experience and improve outcomes for surgical patients throughout the continuum of care. Emphasis will be placed on applying of the nursing process to the concepts of aseptic technique/ infection control and care of the anesthetized patient within the intraoperative environment.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 217: Concepts of Critical Care Nursing

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to explore the care of adult patients with complex, critical care needs. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process to the critical care environment. Content focuses on the nursing management of patients with alterations in major body systems requiring critical care therapy. Common problems in critical care nursing will also be explored including sedation/delirium management, pain/pain management, nutritional alterations, and end-of-life care.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 218: Introduction to Oncology Nursing

3 Credits (3 lecture)

This course is designed to provide the student with oncological concepts promoting the advanced knowledge in this specialized area of nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on patient and family-centered nursing care with a focus on the nursing management of the adult oncology patient. Cancers and the risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, staging, treatment, and follow up care are addressed. Multiple treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, surgery and radiation and the nursing management of side effects from treatment will be discussed. Common problems in oncology nursing will be explored including; comfort, end-of-life issues and oncologic emergencies.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 412

Co-requisite: NUR 215 or NUR 414

NUR 219: Medical-Surgical Nursing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to explore the care of adult patients with acute and chronic healthcare problems. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process to understand and incorporate best practice for common medical conditions and emergencies. Evidence-based practice will be the framework to explore current practice, pharmacological therapies and new trends. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgement skills.

Prerequisite: NUR 211 or NUR 311

Co-requisite: NUR 215

NUR 290: Advanced Medical-Surgical Remediation Elective

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course assists students in remediation of content areas in need of strengthening and on test taking strategies. This course will focus on advanced medical-surgical content, mental health, and pharmacology.

Authorization by ADN Program Director is required.

Co-requisite: None

NUR 220/NUR 220A: Health Assessment with Lab

4 Credits (2 lecture + 2 lab credits)

This course provides the student with knowledge of the concepts necessary to perform a comprehensive health history and health assessment of individual patients across the lifespan. To facilitate acquisition of knowledge and concepts, the course incorporates biophysical, psychosocial and spiritual growth and development into the dimensions of health assessment. Emphasis is placed on the normal age-related findings of assessment as well as appropriate developmental tasks. Hands-on laboratory time and simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite: BIO 112, SOPS 105, FYE 102, PSY 110

Co-requisite: NUR 297/NUR 297A, BIO 300

NUR 221/NUR 221A: Nursing Skills: Concepts of Quality & Safety

4 Credits (2 lecture + 2 clinical)

This course builds upon health assessment competencies, specifically incorporating the concepts of safety, functional ability, fluid and electrolytes, infection, nutrition, sensory perception, thermoregulation, and pain in the performance of clinical nursing skills. Service learning experiences, simulation experiences, and select acute care inpatient clinical experiences will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A, NUR 297/NUR 297A, BIO 300, BIO 121, MAT 105, IS 200, CHEM105

Co-requisite: NUR 298/NUR 298A, BIO 180, BIO 215, IS200

NUR 297/NUR 297A: Professional Development Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student is introduced to the concepts of caring, professionalism, development, and the nursing process. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to establishing human connections in the role of the nurse. Students will be introduced to the profession of nursing and to the use of the nursing process to guide clinical decision-making across the lifespan. Areas of interest for the capstone project will begin to be explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: SOPS 101, FYE 102

Co-requisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A

NUR 298/NUR 298A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credits (Lecture)

This is a professional development course in which the student is introduced to the concepts of clinical judgment and the NCLEX exam. Students will begin to learn strategies for success in preparing to take NCLEX. The concept of professionalism is further explored in this course, especially as it relates to professional licensure and accuracy in practice. Responsibilities of the nurse related to independent practice decisions and management of care are explored. Areas of interest for the capstone project are explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 220/NUR 220A, NUR 297/NUR 297A

Co-requisite NUR 221/NUR 221A

NUR 305/NUR 305A: Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan I

6 Credits (4 lecture + 2 clinical)

This course is a health and illness course in which the student participates in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care to patients in a variety of settings and to providing leadership for the interprofessional healthcare team. Service learning experiences in the community and in long-term care settings, as well as focused acute care clinical experiences, will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, NUR 298/NUR 298A, BIO 215, PSY 210

Co-requisite: None

NUR 307/NUR 307A: Concepts of Intellectual Inquiry

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with a foundational understanding of research, evidence-based practice, healthcare quality, and healthcare information systems and technologies utilized in nursing practice and nursing education. A basic understanding of research terminology and process will be explored. Introduction to evidence-based practice will emphasize identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, performing an effective search for sound evidence, and changing practice based on evidence. Information management systems to improve healthcare outcomes related to safety, quality, cost-effectiveness, and coordination of healthcare services along with ethical, legal, and regulatory issues will also be explored. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, STAT 201

NUR 309/NUR 309A: Professional Nursing Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in professional nursing concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to collaboration, care coordination, patient education, caregiving and palliation. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on the concept of family caregiving, especially as it relates to chronic and terminal disease. Completing of a formal teaching plan will allow students to obtain the skills necessary to provide healthcare teaching in any setting. An emphasis on collaboration with other nurses and with the inter-professional team provides the basis for care coordination in a variety of settings. Simulation experiences will assist the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 221/NUR 221A, ENG 315

NUR 311/NUR 311A: Health & Illness Concepts Across the Lifespan II

6 Credits (4 Lecture + 2 Clinical)

This course is a health and illness course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care and patient education in a variety of settings and to providing leadership for the interprofessional healthcare team. Service learning experiences in the community and in long-term care settings, as well as focused acute care clinical experiences, will assist students to integrate course concepts and construct learning from previously-learned concepts. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305/NUR 305A

NUR 312: Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery

4 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in nursing leadership and health care delivery concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to leadership, healthcare policy, healthcare economics, healthcare law, and change theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore the professional nurse’s role in leading the inter-professional team. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the current and future healthcare system as it is affected by healthcare economics, policy, and law. Change theory will be utilized to solve a current problem in healthcare. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 307

Co-requisite: None

NUR 312A: Concepts in Leadership & Health Care Delivery

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a course in nursing leadership and health care delivery concepts. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to leadership, healthcare policy, healthcare economics, healthcare law, and change theory. Students will have the opportunity to explore the professional nurse’s role in leading the inter-professional team. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the current and future healthcare system as it is affected by healthcare economics, policy, and law. Change theory will be utilized to solve a current problem in healthcare. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 307A

Co-requisite: None

NUR 313: Concepts in Population Health

2 Credits (2 Lecture)

This course 313 introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population–focused care. Building upon previously-learned concepts, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for planning population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a project focused on the older adult in the community, students perform a comprehensive evidence-based assessment and plan health promotion. Simulation assists the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills related to the concepts of addiction, self-management, and interpersonal violence. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305

Co-requisite: None

NUR 313A: Concepts in Population Health

3 Credits (2 Lecture)

This course introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population–focused care. Building upon previously-learned concepts, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for planning population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a project focused on the older adult in the community, students perform a comprehensive evidence-based assessment and plan health promotion. Simulation assists the student in developing critical thinking and clinical judgment skills related to the concepts of addiction, self-management, and interpersonal violence. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 305A

Co-requisite: None

NUR 320: Nursing Informatics

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course will provide students with a knowledge base of healthcare information systems and technologies utilized in nursing practice and nursing education. The focus of this course is to explore information management systems to improve healthcare outcomes related to safety, quality, cost-effectiveness, and coordination of healthcare services along with ethical, legal, and regulatory issues. Consumer health information sources are explored and analyzed.

Prerequisite: None

Note: Must be taken in the first 8 weeks of enrollment in the RN-BSN program.

NUR 335: Introduction to Research and Evidence-Based Practice

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course will provide students with a foundational understanding of research and evidence-based practice. A basic understanding of research terminology and process will be explored. Introduction to evidence-based practice will emphasize identification of a clinical issue, formulation of a researchable question, performing an effective search for sound evidence, and changing practice based on evidence. The basic understanding of research and evidence-based practice will serve as a foundation for improving patient outcomes.

Prerequisite: STAT 201, ENG 315, NUR 350

NUR 350: Nursing Theories and Foundational Concepts

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course focuses on nursing theory, philosophy and conceptual frameworks as a foundation of nursing practice. Students will explore the impact of nursing theory, philosophy, and conceptual frameworks as they relate to the profession and the role of the nurse. An understanding of these concepts will be the foundation for professional growth and advancement.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 365: Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course explores legal and ethical issues in the delivery of healthcare. The nurse’s role in ethical clinical practice is examined. The student examines personal and professional values in relation to ethical and legal issues occurring in the practice of professional nursing. Appraising basic principles of current legal concepts and professional ethical codes provides a foundation for professional practice. Sociocultural influences on ethical and legal concepts are explored.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 397/NUR 397A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The concept of professionalism is further explored in this course as it relates to scope of practice. Areas of interest for the Capstone project will be refined, with identification of a specific Capstone topic area by the end of this course. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 298/NUR 298A, COM 101

NUR 398/NUR 398A: Professional Development Concepts

1 Credit (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s chosen topic for the Capstone project will be developed in a Capstone Proposal in which the student will delineate strategies for assessment of the population at risk, anticipated population outcomes, the implementation of evidence-based interventions to improve population outcomes, and evaluation of the achievement of population outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 397/NUR 397A

NUR 401, 402, 403, 404: Clinical Internship Elective

1 Credit (Clinical)

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop and refine knowledge and skills necessary in providing direct patient care. Working with a preceptor, students will care for patients/populations in a healthcare setting.

Students will reflect on the role of the BSN-prepared registered nurse within a complex and dynamic healthcare system, especially as related to quality and safety in patient care.

Prerequisite: None

NUR 410: Clinical Intensive I

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care in the inpatient acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 311, NUR 312, NUR 313

NUR 410A: Clinical Intensive I

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care in the inpatient acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Simulation experiences will assist the student to further develop critical thinking and clinical judgment skills. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self- directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 311A, NUR 313A

NUR 412: Clinical Intensive II

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the community setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 410

NUR 412A: Clinical Intensive II

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to chronic health problems. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the community setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 410A

NUR 414: Clinical Intensive III

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This is a role transition course in medical surgical nursing in which the student will perform care in the role of the professional nurse under the direction of a preceptor. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients in the acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412

NUR 414A: Clinical Intensive III

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems. This is a role transition course in medical surgical nursing in which the student will perform care in the role of the professional nurse under the direction of a preceptor. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients in the acute care setting. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412A

NUR 416: Clinical Intensive IV

6 Credits (1 Didactic + 5 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in the specialty or community setting. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the specialty setting or in the community. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412

NUR 416A: Clinical Intensive IV

6 Credits (2 Didactic + 4 Clinical)

This course is a clinical intensive course in which the student applies evidence in the care of patients across the lifespan related to acute and chronic health problems in the specialty or community setting. This course is designed to facilitate the student’s acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to providing safe and quality care for patients and populations in the specialty setting or in the community. Students will synthesize all previously learned concepts in the clinical area as well as in clinical integration seminars. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 412A

NUR 420: Health Care Policy

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to influence policy in a dynamic healthcare environment. Financial and regulatory environments are investigated to determine the impact on patient outcomes and the role of healthcare professionals. Advocacy as a healthcare professional to promote social justice of vulnerable populations is discussed.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 435: Population Health and Community-Based Nursing

5 Credits (3 didactic + 2 clinical)

This course introduces students to current concepts in community-based nursing and population –focused care. Building upon previous nursing education, students engage in the process of conceptualizing individuals, families, groups and communities as populations in which lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors are major determinants of health. Comprehensive assessment of community and population characteristics is emphasized as a basis for population-focused interventions aimed at health promotion, disease, and injury prevention across the lifespan. Using principles of evidence-based practice through a community clinical practicum, students assess the economic, sociocultural, and environmental influences and develop interventions to meet community-based and population-focused needs.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 450: Caring for the Older Adult

5 Credits (3 didactic + 2 clinical)

This course focuses on the highly complex needs of the older adult and their families. Students will explore socioeconomic, physical, psychological, safety, ethical, and legal issues of the older adult. Evidence regarding health promotion, health maintenance, and acute/chronic disease management is examined to develop patient-centered care for the older adult. A clinical practicum will address the needs of the independent older adult living in the community.

Prerequisite: ENG 315, NUR 320

NUR 465: Leadership and Management in Nursing

5 Credits (2 didactic + 3 lab)

This course focuses on developing and understanding leadership skills and concepts. Students explore a variety of theories related to leadership, management, and change. Analysis of leadership styles, behaviors, and communication techniques assist with the development of skills necessary to lead at the bedside and within a healthcare system. Students examine evidence-based quality improvement and patient safety strategies to improve healthcare outcomes. A capstone project involving quality improvement change in either the acute care or community setting will be initiated.

Prerequisite: NUR 335, NUR 435.

Note: Must be taken in the last 8 weeks of enrollment in RN-BSN core courses.

NUR 497/NUR 497A: Professional Development Concepts

2 Credits (Lecture)

This course is a professional development course in which the student continues to develop strategies for NCLEX Success. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s Capstone project will be implemented as developed in the Capstone Proposal. The student will implement an assessment of the identified population at risk and will implement evidence-based interventions to improve population outcomes. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 398/NUR 398A

NUR 498/NUR 498A: Professional Development Concepts/ Capstone

2 Credits (Lecture)

NUR 498 is a professional development course in which the student continues to follow TCCNHS NCLEX Success Plan. Increased exposure to NCLEX-style questions is provided to enhance proficiency in answering the types of test items found on the NCLEX exam. Practice NCLEX-style questions will also help to support learning in nursing coursework. The student’s Capstone project will be evaluated as developed in the Capstone Proposal. The student will evaluate outcomes for an identified population at risk following implementation of interventions. A final Capstone Paper and Presentation will illustrate the Capstone project in its entirety. Active learning strategies employed in this course will promote the development of leadership skills and self-directed lifelong learning.

Prerequisite: NUR 497/NUR 497A

Philosophy

PHI 103: Introduction to Ethics

3 Credits (Lecture)

Introduction to Ethics will assist students in coming to understand the various theoretical, conceptual frameworks, and application models of moral reasoning. Such applications of theoretical models and frameworks will expose the student to different approaches to moral competence and decision-making in complex life situations. This course aims to be holistic in its approach; hence ethics-related issues involving medical/health issues will be minimized and a broad humanities-based approach will be incorporated.

Prerequisite: None

PHI 205: World Religions

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of and appreciation for the major religions of the world; Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam. In addition the course will explore indigenous spiritual paths such as Celtic and Native American spiritual traditions. The course will explore the history of each tradition, its core beliefs, cosmology, canon of sacred writings, and styles of prayer and worship. This course will also explore humanism in its various forms, as well as atheism. The course will also address the influence of these various traditions on society, as well as the issues surrounding the diversity of religious traditions in a highly pluralistic society.

Prerequisite: None

PHI 210: Ethical Issues in Contemporary Health Care and Research

3 Credits (Lecture)

Based on their prior knowledge of ethical reasoning and traditional and contemporary moral theories, learners will explore through reading, research, and experiential learning activities the ethical issues embedded within contemporary healthcare and health research. Using their moral reasoning skills, learners will have the opportunity to propose ethical solutions to the many problems that arise within today’s healthcare and bioresearch.

Prerequisite: PHI 103

Psychology

PSY 110: Lifespan Development

3 Credits (Lecture)

Students will learn about the psychological theories/conceptual frameworks and research that inform the study of cognitive, personality, and social development across the lifespan.

Prerequisite: None

PSY 210: Concepts of Behavior Change

3 Credits (Lecture)

This course builds on the foundational knowledge in introductory social sciences courses that focus on understanding thought and behavior to help learners understand how and why people change their behavior. Theories of learning, goal-setting, performance, sports psychology, motivation, and self-reflection will be used to help learners see why people do or do not change their behavior so that, ultimately, methods can be used to design plans for those that could benefit from changes in behavior.

Prerequisite: None

Sociology

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology

3 Credits (Lecture)

What makes up a society? A society is composed of separate, but interrelated components, or social institutions. The family, government, education, and religion are some of the large structures that guide our everyday lives. Introduction to Sociology explores these institutions of society, along with other individual factors, such as race, class, and gender, in order to understand what it means to live in a global society. Students are given the opportunity to develop their sociological imagination to become critical of the world around them, and will learn to analyze this social world using a variety of theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite: None

SOC 102: Sociological Perspectives on U.S. Diversity

3 Credits (Lecture)

Sociological Perspectives on U.S. Diversity is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the United States and its incredibly diverse population. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101

SOC 103: Sociological Perspectives on Global Diversity

3 Credits (Lecture)

Sociological Perspectives on Global Diversity is designed so that students will gain insights into, and learn the various sociological analyses of, the strengths, challenges and opportunities facing the global diverse populations. Particular emphasis will be placed on multicultural awareness, race, ethnicity, social class, and gender.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or equivalent or SOPS 101

SOC 200: Seminar on Race

1 Credit Hour (1 Lecture)

Explore the ways that race still matters in a society that considers itself to be post-racial. In this discussion-based seminar, we consider what race is, how it is socially constructed, and the ways that institutional discrimination and inequality persist. How we interpret our own racial identity is guided by the ways we understand race operating in our society. Throughout the course, we reflect on our everyday experiences to better understand how race is relevant – including in a healthcare environment.

Prerequisite: None.

SOPS 101: Introduction to Social Psychology

3 Credits (Lecture)

Social psychology is the systematic study of human social behavior. In this course, you will study how individuals and groups of people behave, and what causes these behaviors. You will learn to use theoretical perspectives to answer questions like, “Why are people attracted to one another?” and “When are we most likely to help a stranger?” and “Why do some people follow rules, while other people break them?” You will study classical and contemporary research to understand how the scientific method is used to test and create theories of social behavior.

SOPS 105: Social and Cultural Issues in Regional Healthcare

3 Credits (Lecture)

Healthcare in our region is delivered in a variety of settings by diverse human beings using many different methods: in clinics, hospitals, schools, even grocery stores! This course invites you to explore these settings and to better understand our healthcare system. At the center of this exploration will be us, the human beings seeking and giving the care. We will discuss the social and cultural factors (determinants) that influence individuals’ health decisions and behaviors as well as the social and cultural competencies expected of healthcare providers. We will also explore our healthcare system, discussing organization and structure, and the places and ways healthcare is delivered and experienced.

Prerequisite: None

SOPS 201: Exploring Current Topics in Health

1 Credits (1 Lecture)

This course is intended to prepare advanced-standing students for lifelong learning and professional development. It also provides an opportunity for students to earn 1 credit hour working directly with faculty. Students will work directly with identified faculty member to explore a topic or concept from a multi-faceted perspective (for example, to explore cultural competency in a community-based health care organization or to conduct an asset mapping of social-service resources for an identified population). So the student will make connections with the college outcomes in a framework relevant to the learning needs of the student, students will engage in designing their own leaning experience, assignment or projects, as well as methods for self-assessment and evaluation.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Associate Dean and assignment to faculty member. Advanced-standing students only.

Statistics

STAT 201: Introduction to Statistics

3 Credits (Lecture)

STAT 201 focuses on the use of statistics to conduct and critique research. Topics include: descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and the use of computer software for statistical applications. Students will learn to apply, analyze, and interpret statistics from research articles and data in the health care setting.

Prerequisites: MAT 105 or equivalent.

*For students enrolled in the RN-BSN completion program, the prerequisite is waived

Technology

TECH 101: Basic Technology Skills and Applications

3 Credits (Lecture)

Being a contributing citizen in the 21st Century requires the use of technology. This course will provide an introduction to basic computer/technology skills, word processing, cloud applications, and trending apps that will be helpful in any working field or arena.

Prerequisites: None

Academic Policies and Procedures

General Notice

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences reserves the right to alter or discontinue any of its programs, fees, policies, or services, and to change any provision or policy in the interest of the College or its students at any point in time. The College also reserves the right to cancel courses and course sections, even after registration has taken place, if there is low enrollment, the unavailability of a qualified faculty person, the lack of a clinical site, or other extenuating circumstances. Every effort will be made to place students in other sections of the same course if this is possible.

As a matter of policy, students at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences are bound by the curriculum in effect. Once accepted, all students without transfer credit exemption status for previously completed college courses must follow the pre-arranged College course schedules. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences may terminate at any time the enrollment of a student whose scholastic standing, performance, health, aptitude, or social conduct does not meet the requirements of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

Curricular changes are to be expected in response to rapidly changing regulatory, educational, and/or healthcare environmental factors.

Academic Integrity and Honesty

Updated 3/29/16

In an effort to remain faithful to the College’s core values, especially those of integrity and excellence, it is the expectation that all members of the College community make ongoing efforts to be people of integrity in all learning modalities including classroom, clinical, laboratory, simulation, and online learning so that a culture of integrity can pervade the institution. Academic integrity can be understood as the consistency between the promises that we make and the words that we speak and the actions that we perform.

As an institution, we have the responsibility to act with integrity. The institution must make certain the promises it makes to its students, faculty, staff, and to the community are realized in the words put forth by the College, and by all of the actions taken by the College.

The faculty and the staff have a responsibility to act with integrity. Every faculty member must make certain that there is consistency between the learning outcomes of every course and the learning activities in which they engage. They must make certain that every policy in their course syllabi is carried out equally for all students. The staff need to ensure that they perform their various duties with integrity.

Students, by virtue of their membership in the College community, must also ensure that they are people of integrity by engaging in words and actions that uphold the values of the College: caring, collaboration, excellence, and integrity. The College community is strengthened when actions are in line with the promises that are made and implied by each member of the College community. A student’s acceptance of admission to the College constitutes a commitment to act honorably in all situations and to uphold the policies, procedures, and behavioral expectations of the College.

All members of the College community are held to the highest standard of integrity. The actions of each member of the College community should demonstrate a consistency between the values that we uphold and the words that we speak and the actions that we take.

Examples of Failures to Uphold Academic Integrity and Honesty in all communication and learning modalities including classroom, clinical, laboratory, simulation, and online learning:

The Institution:

  • When its advertising is not consistent with what is actually delivered at the school.
  • If its tuition and fees are not reflective of actual institutional need.
  • When policies are not clearly articulated or when policies are not justly and equitably applied.

The Faculty and Staff:

When faculty or staff fail to clearly articulate what is expected of students especially with regard to integrity and fail to note the sanctions for violating academic integrity standards

  • When faculty fail to define course learning outcomes
  • If faculty do not actually teach to the learning outcomes
  • When faculty fail to properly cite the sources of their information
  • If faculty fail to treat all students equitably and with fairness and justice

The Student:

  • When a student falsifies records
  • If a student cheats, plagiarizes, or purchases a paper and claims it as their own
  • When a student collaborates with others on a paper or project that is supposed to reflect their own work
  • If a student steals
  • When a student violates copyright laws or engages in the unauthorized copying of software
  • If a student observes the lack of integrity on the part of another student and fails to report it

What to Do if You Witness Behaviors that Violate Academic Integrity:

All Members of the College community have a responsibility to ensure that a culture of integrity is pervasive throughout the institution. Each member of the community has an obligation to report actions that violate our common commitment to integrity and excellence.

Faculty Obligations:

  • Address the alleged incident (through investigation) with the student(s), render a decision, and report their response/action to the appropriate Administrator of the College; or
  • Submit the alleged incident(s) to the appropriate Administrator for review, consultation, and possible institutional action.

NOTE: The nature of the incident will determine if resolution and consequences will be determined by faculty and/or administration. Secondly, in situations involving suspected academic dishonesty within a course, faculty have full authority to assign the grade for the assignment, test, quiz, or course. Administration retains the responsibility and right to impose additional sanctions up to and including academic dismissal from the College.

Student Obligations:

  • Outline the alleged breach to the appropriate faculty member(s) whose class the alleged breach occurred as soon as reasonably possible following an incident. Students should bear in mind that though they might inform an academic administrator, the academic administrator will refer the matter back to the course in question so the faculty member(s) can deal with according to academic policies set forth within the classroom. The student should make sure that all information is objective and clear, including the date and time of the incident, name of the student, and the assignment/examination in question.
  • Once an allegation has been made, the faculty member(s) will address as outlined above. NOTE: It is important to note that due to privacy, confidentiality, and other material evidence, a decision will not be announced to the student who has outlined the allegation.

Academic Freedom and Responsibility

The Academic Freedom and Educational Responsibility of Faculty and Students

A college or university is a dedicated social place where students will encounter new knowledge, different perspectives, competing ideas, and alternative claims to truth. Liberal education helps students develop the skills of analysis and critical inquiry with particular emphasis on exploring and evaluating competing claims and different perspectives. Liberally educated students are curious about new intellectual questions, open to alternative ways of viewing a situation or problem, disciplined to follow intellectual methods to conclusions, capable of accepting criticism from others, tolerant of ambiguity, and respectful of others with different views. Personal development is an integral part of intellectual development.

In any education of quality, a variety of competing claims to truth can be explored and tested free from political interference. The persons who drive the production of knowledge and the process of education are highly trained faculty. These individuals take responsibility for the quality of their scholarship and teaching.

In order to foster a true educational experience, faculty and students must agree to the following principles:

  1. An atmosphere of civility must be maintained. Faculty and students have to be respectful of each other’s views, even if they are not in agreement.
  2. Students do not have a right to remain free from encountering unwelcome or inconvenient questions. Students do have the right to hear and examine diverse opinions but within the frameworks that knowledgeable scholars have determined to be reliable and accurate.
  3. All competing ideas on a subject do not deserve to be included in a course or program. The professional judgment of faculty determines the content of courses.

Excerpted with permission from the AACU publication Academic Freedom and Educational Responsibilities. Copyright 2006 by American Association of Colleges and Universities.

The statement is available online at: http://www.aacu.org/About/statements/documents/AcademicFreedom.pdf

Distance Education

Revised 5/22/17

Purpose

Distance education (online and hybrid coursework) supports the mission of The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences to expand the offerings of courses and programs that prepare individuals for the delivery of healthcare and opportunities for life-long learning. Distance education maximizes student access to courses through an electronic-based delivery system, Blackboard Learning Management System.

Verification of Student Identity in Distance Education Courses

Consistent with the statement of academic integrity and honesty, all members of the College community are held to the highest standard of integrity by engaging in words and actions that uphold the values of the College: caring, collaboration, excellence, and integrity. A student’s acceptance of admission to the College constitutes a commitment to act honorably and to uphold the policies, procedures, and behavioral expectations of the College.

In compliance with the Department of Education and all accrediting bodies, The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences has established and will periodically review a process to determine that a student registered for a distance education (online or hybrid) course is the same student that participates in, completes, and receives credit for the course. Reasonable steps should be taken by the faculty member to ensure verification of student identity. This verification may be accomplished by any one or a combination of:

  1. Secure logon and passcode;
  2. Proctored examinations;
  3. Student sign in/signature for some proctored exams;
  4. Verification using photo ID; and
  5. New or other technologies and practices that are effective in identifying identity of students. (Christ College does utilize Biometric Signature ID for authenticating students enrolled in online programs)

As an institution, the College has the responsibility to act with integrity; as such, the College will make all reasonable efforts to protect student privacy in verifying student identity as well as disclose upfront any costs to be incurred by the student with respect to verification of student identity at the time of registration or enrollment.

References: The Higher Learning Commission. Commission Policies (November 2011). Policy 3.12 Verification of the Identity of Students in Distance or Correspondence Education, page 91. _

Available at http://www.ncahlc.org/Policy/commission-policy.html

Definitions for Delivery Modalities

Edited 10/5/16

Based on best practices in higher education, and in compliance with federal law and the policies of accrediting agencies, the following definitions are offered to provide clarity about the various delivery modalities used in this College.

Face-to-face: The majority of instructional time is in the classroom but may include up to 50% of online instructional time.

Hybrid: Between 50% and 75% of the instructional time for this course will be online.

Online: Between 75% and 100% of the instructional time for this course will be online. Some face-to-face instruction might be required.

NOTE: Faculty members are permitted to use a variety of delivery modalities and learning activities, including, but not limited to, online delivery, field work, off-site activities, and clinical work. Students should always refer to the syllabus for each course for an explanation of the manner in which a course will be delivered. All syllabi are posted on Blackboard one week prior to the beginning of the semester.

Reference: Ohio Department of Higher Education, Supplement (March 2010). Online Delivery.

Obtained by contacting http://www.ohiohighered.org/academic-program-approval.

Technology Requirements

Added 5/2/16; Revised 5/23/17

Access to and understanding of technology is essential for success in distance education courses. Students must have access to a reliable computer and high-speed internet connection. For more information on course-specific technology requirements, students should reference their course syllabi. For program-specific technology requirements, students should reference their respective program’s handbook, the College website (under Enrollment Steps), and/or “Technology Requirements, Recommendations and Support” in the College Support Services section of this document.

Placement Assessments

Placement assessments may be used by the College to determine a student’s academic readiness to engage in coursework necessary for completion of their chosen academic program.

Detailed information pertaining to placement assessments will be provided to students. Students will be required to complete those placement tests that are consistent with the policies in effect at the time of admission to the College. Such placement tests might vary from program to program. Previous placement test results from other schools will not be accepted.

A fee for administering examinations may be assessed.

Based on placement assessment results, students may be required to enroll in identified coursework or other defined remediation.

Placement assessment results and remediation procedures (coursework or tutorials) will be discussed with the student prior to enrollment in their first semester at the College.

Prerequisite Policy General Statement

  1. Students are expected to take College courses no later than the term they are prescribed. Students are strongly encouraged to refer to program curriculum plans as well as consult with their academic advisor.
  2. Students should work with their academic advisor to determine when courses are offered so as to properly plan their academic curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they understand the course of study once they begin their studies. The College does not assume responsibility for a student who fails to properly register for required courses.
  3. Program specific policies may require prerequisites for progression. See Program specific handbook.
  4. IMPORTANT: The Chief Academic Officer or designee must approve any deviation from this schedule.
  5. For additional information on prerequisites and co-requisites, refer to curriculum and course descriptions in this catalog.

Course Cancellation Policy

The College values quality education while maintaining fiscal responsibility. In order to be financially accountable, course sections with low enrollment will be cancelled and course sections that are not at enrollment capacity will be combined.

Time to Degree for Matriculated Students

Refer to specific Program Handbooks for “Time to Degree” timelines.

Dual Degrees

Added 8/17/17

Students may earn more than one undergraduate degree concurrently from the College. A student who completes all requirements for two or more different degrees will be awarded multiple degrees and will receive multiple diplomas. Students pursuing multiple degrees must follow the stipulations described below:

Second Associate Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 15 credit hours in residence unique to each program.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.
  • Associate and Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently
  • Earn a minimum of 136 credit hours, including a minimum of 76 credit hours in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

Second Bachelor’s Degree Concurrently

  • Earn a minimum of 164 credit hours, including a minimum of 50% of credit hours for each major in residence.
  • Meets all degree requirements for both degree programs.

In order to declare a second major, a student should meet with his/her advisor and complete the Dual Degree Declaration Form. The advisor will then send the form to the Registrar.

Grading Policy

Classroom Grading

Updated 2/10/17

To successfully complete any course at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, a grade of at least a “C” (2.0) or higher must be achieved. Please note a grade of “D” or lower constitutes a failing grade in either nursing or general education coursework. Assignment of a letter grade constitutes completion of the course and enrollment in the course for the entire period. Students should refer to syllabi for course grading scales.

Letter grades are assigned to the final course grade according to the following:

| Letter Grade | Grade Point Average | |————–|———————| | A | 4 | | A- | 3.67 | | B+ | 3.33 | | B | 3 | | B- | 2.67 | | C+ | 2.33 | | C | 2 | | D | 1 | | F | 0 |

Term and Cumulative Averages

Final course letter grades are converted to quality points in order to compute term and cumulative averages as defined by the Academic Grading Policy.

  • The grades a student received in a course accepted as transfer credit from another institution are not included in the computation of either term or cumulative averages.
  • Term average, computed each term a student is in the program, and is based on final grades achieved in all courses taken during that term.
  • Cumulative average, computed each term, is based on the final grades achieved in all courses required in the program up to that time.

Incomplete Course

An incomplete course is a course in which the student has not completed the required course work by the end of the term.

Criteria:

  1. Course assignments not completed by the end of the term may result in a grade of Incomplete (I). No point grade is assigned to the course. Assignment of the grade of “I” is solely at the discretion of the instructor.
  2. All incomplete coursework must be completed no later than ten (10) business days following the last day of the semester in which the “I” grade was assigned.
  3. Failure to complete all required coursework by the designated time will result in the “I” grade being permanently changed to an “F”.
  4. The “F” is then calculated into the student’s GPA.
  5. Students who have an “I” for a grade do not qualify for Academic Honors.

Assignment of Credit Hours

Edited 10/3/16

Semester credit hour allotment for a course is determined according to the following:

  • Class: 1 clock hour per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Nursing Clinical : 3 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Lab: 2 clock hours per week for 15 weeks = 1 credit hour
  • Clock hour adjustments are made for eight (8) week courses to equate to credit hours as outlined above.

NOTES:

  • One Clock Hour = 50 minutes
  • A semester terms includes a fifteen (15) week instructional period plus one (1) week of final examinations.
  • An eight (8) week semester including eight (8) instructional weeks including final exams

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences defines clock hour and credit hour as follows:

Clock Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, a clock hour shall be defined as 50 minutes.

Credit Hour: In alignment with common practices in higher education and in compliance with Federal Law and the policies of accrediting agencies, one credit hour is earned when a student has successfully completed 750 minutes of instruction within a given semester or term as defined by the institution (1 credit hour = 750 minutes).

It shall further be understood that each credit hour presumes a minimum of an additional two clock hours of work outside of the classroom.

Example: A three (3) credit course consists of three (3) clock hours (150 minutes) each week for a total 2250 minutes for a 15 week semester.

A three (3) credit course also requires that students are given six (6) clock hours of work to be done outside of the classroom or 300 minutes/week of such work. These activities could include writing assignments, reading assignments, working on problem-solving skills such as case studies, viewing videos or PowerPoint presentations, reviewing course material, observing the world around them, etc.

Online Course Example: It will be important to be able to demonstrate that the learning activities in an online course will consume a minimum of 2250 minutes of instructional time in addition to time that students will need to spend in preparation for those learning activities such as reviewing materials, preparing for tests or quizzes, preparing drafts for written assignments, etc.

References:

  1. _Department of Education, Memo GEN11-06 (October 29, 2010). Guidance to Institutions and Accrediting Agencies Regarding a Credit Hour as Defined in the Final Regulations. _Available at http://ifap.ed.gov/dpcletters/GEN1106.html
  2. _The Higher Learning Commission. Commission Policies (November 2011). Policy 3.10(a), Assignment of Credit Hours, page 54. _Available at http://www.ncahlc.org/Policy/commission-policy.html

Dean’s List of Honors

  1. All full-time students (12 semester credit hours) are eligible for Dean’s List of Honors.
  2. At the end of each semester, both the semester and cumulative GPA will be calculated.
  3. Students with a semester average of 3.50-4.00 receive Deans List of Honors.
  4. The Dean’s List of Honors designation is separate from Latin honors at graduation.
  5. Dean’s List of Honors will be noted on official transcripts for the semester the honor was awarded.

Academic Standing

Students are considered to be in good academic standing within the College provided they maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, have finalized any grade of “incomplete” within the specified period of time, and are not in violation of any academic policy such as that of academic integrity and honesty.

Early Alert System

The Early Alert System is designed to alert students if they are in danger of failing a course. The system provides the opportunity for the student and professor to collaborate in order to determine appropriate interventions for the student, engaging the student’s academic advisor as a resource.

If you are in danger of failing a course by week four of an eight-week semester or week seven of a 16-week semester, your professor will send you an email and request to meet with you to identify challenges and discuss actions for moving forward. Your academic advisor will also be notified and can serve as a resource to you for non-academic related obstacles that may be preventing your success in a course. Please take the responsibility to communicate with your professor and advisor, as appropriate, so they can work with you and help you identify resources to support your success in the course. In addition to your professor and advisor, you should consider tutoring, the Writing Center, counseling for personal and financial trouble, and other support to help you be successful in the course.

Academic Probation

A student will be placed on academic probation at the end of any semester in which the student has earned a term or cumulative grade point average of less than 2.0.

  1. A student who has been placed on academic probation will be notified via e-mail, student mailbox, and/or US Postal mail. The notification will include a plan outlining the necessary steps to return to good academic standing.
  2. In the event a student on academic probation fails to attain a 2.0 semester and cumulative average for the next semester of attendance, the student will be dismissed from the institution.

Academic Dismissal

Updated 2/16/17

Academic Dismissal refers to a student enrolled in The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences whose enrollment has been terminated. Academic dismissal is determined by an Associate Dean or designee and formally approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the institution.

The enrollment of a student may be terminated for any of the following reasons:

  1. Two continuous semesters of a term or cumulative GPA below a 2.0.
  2. Failure of a student to remove self from probation or suspension by the time specified.
  3. Lack of integrity, dishonesty, violation of College policies, behavior considered detrimental to safe and effective patient care (if a nursing student), or other misconduct. (Such behaviors may also invoke probation.)

SPECIAL NOTES: Reinstatement following dismissal or termination is not automatic and must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer of the College.

Attendance Policy

Revised 7/26/17

A primary objective of the College is the demonstration of student accountability through responsible self-directed behaviors. Consistent attendance offers the most effective opportunity for students to gain command of the concepts and material. Daily attendance, prompt arrival, demonstration of a positive attitude of respect, and cooperation are expected. Classroom attendance is expected. Individual course faculty may establish course policies that consider attendance as a factor in determining course grades. Please refer to program handbooks and course syllabi for specific attendance policies.

Attendance in Hybrid Courses

Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no-show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped for the course. Academic activities in a hybrid nursing course include face-to-face class meetings, posting in a graded discussion board or blog. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.

Attendance in Online Courses

  1. Online attendance is assessed by submission of online academic activities by the published due date and time. All due times reflect Eastern Time Zone.
  2. Emails to course faculty to ask questions are not considered academic activities for attendance purposes.
  3. Any student who does not participate in at least one academic activity by the first Friday of the course by 11:59pm will be reported as a ‘no show’ to the Registrar’s Office. The student will be dropped from the course. Academic activities in an online nursing course include posting in a graded discussion board, a blog post, journal, or written assignment.

NOTE: A separate policy exists for “Dropping Students Who Never Attend Class.” Refer to section on Registrationand Records LINK NEEDED– General Polices in this catalog.

Non-Continuous Enrollment Policy

Revised 1/15/16; 5/8/17

A student who needs to take one (1) semester off from the scheduled coursework outlined in his/her education plan will be considered non-continuously enrolled. Non-continuously enrolled students may take no more than one (1) semester off from scheduled coursework, and return to classes will be contingent upon the space available. Notes: A student must have had at least one grade issued at the College to be eligible for non-continuous enrollment. If a student withdraws from coursework after the drop/add date (and has therefore been assigned a grade), non-continuous enrollment will begin in the following semester of scheduled coursework. If a student needs to take an extended period of time off for medical or catastrophic reasons, s/he should reference the Leave of Absence Policy.

Any student who is non-continuously enrolled must first speak with his/her academic advisor and be responsible for maintaining communication with the academic advisor regarding plans to return to classes. A non-continuously enrolled student must contact his/her academic advisor no later than eight (8) weeks prior to the start of the semester in which s/he plans to return to classes. A student returning from non-continuous enrollment must register for classes after those students who have remained continuously enrolled and followed a normal course progression. A student on non-continuous enrollment must also contact the Administrative Assistant of Arts and Sciences eight (8) weeks prior to his/her return in order to complete any outstanding health or enrollment requirements.

Any student who fails to return from non-continuous enrollment will be automatically withdrawn from the College on the first day of the semester in which s/he is scheduled to return, and s/he must reapply in order to return to the College in a future semester. Non-Continuous Enrollment extensions beyond one semester must be approved by the Chief Academic Officer and Dean of College Support Services.

Illness in the Classroom, Lab and Clinical Settings

Medical Emergency Situation

A. For an emergency health need during scheduled nursing classes or in a clinical facility without emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will either contact the Emergency Medical System (911) to summon emergency assistance for the student, or follow policy for emergencies as outlined in the College Catalog.

B. For an emergency health need during scheduled clinical time in a clinical facility with emergency department services, the faculty/clinical instructor, or designee will assist in transporting the student to the emergency department.

C. The student is responsible for payment of emergency services and any treatment incurred.

Medical Nonemergency Situation in the Classroom, Lab Setting and Clinical Setting

A. Students with a nonemergency health need during class, lab or clinical time must self-identify to the faculty, clinical instructor or designee the nature of the health need. The faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e., preceptor) will determine if the student can continue with learning activities.

B. When the student is released from class, lab or clinical, the faculty, clinical instructor, or designee (i.e. preceptor) will assist the student in arranging transportation from the facility if needed.

C. This may count as an absence according to the classroom and clinical attendance policies.

Cadaver and Dissection Policy

Added 3/17/16

The following guidelines are established for the safe dissection of animal hearts and animal tissues along with fresh and embalmed human cadavers. Proper handling, cleaning and disinfection practices are necessary to reduce risks of transmission. The dissection and examination of the tissues are for educational and training purposes only.

A donated human cadaver represents one of the most valuable teaching tools for the study of human anatomy.

  • You are required to treat the cadavers with the respect and consideration due to a living person. The cadavers are to be referred to by their sex or tag number ONLY.
  • No signs of disrespect for the cadaver will be tolerated by any of the faculty.
  • Disrespectful behavior could result in your dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • NO outside visitors or guests are allowed into the lab at any time under any circumstances to view the cadaver.
  • Students will gain access to the cadaver only in the presence of, or through the direction of, faculty members.
  • NO photography of any kind is allowed.
  • Because of this, **no photography or video equipment **– including cell phones – of any kind are allowed in the laboratory. Leave all cell phones at home or turn them off and store in your bag as you enter the laboratory. Failure to comply with this rule can create legal problems for both you and the college and will not be tolerated. Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the course and/or the college.
  • Although the cadavers have been dissected prior to the laboratory session, it is the student’s responsibility to maintain the condition of the cadaver during the lab sessions.

This includes handling labels with care and using the wetting solution provided to keep the cadavers moist.

  • Wear gloves at all times when handling the cadavers and dispose of gloves properly. Hands are to be washed/disinfected after gloves are removed.

Other personal protective equipment, such as impervious gowns and face protection, is available for use.

  • Cadaveric material should NOT leave the lab under any circumstance. This includes both solid tissue and fluid waste.

All sharps and other contaminated disposable equipment is to be discarded in sharps containers.

  • Waste material should NEVER be placed down drains or thrown into common trash.
  • If a student is pregnant or intends to become pregnant during the semester, the student must contact either the professor of the course or the Associate Dean of Compliance for general education and instructional support services as soon as possible.
  • Environmental Services (513-585-3031) is to be contacted to both deliver and pick-up the biohazard container for proper disposal of tissues.

Final Exam Policy

Added 3/13/2017

It is TCCNHS policy that all final exams will be administered during the specified final exam week on the College Calendar. 8-week courses will administer the final examination during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom. The College is required to provide the calculated number of instructional contact hours as stated in the syllabus. Contact hours are determined based on the definition 1 credit hour = 750 minutes. The College also states in the College Catalog that it provides 15 weeks of instruction and 1 week for final exams.

  1. If a final examination, comprehensive or not, is part of a class requirements, it must be given only during the final examination week according to the final exam schedule. Final examinations administered earlier than the appointed time, either during the prior week or during the final examination week, are not permitted.
  2. The examination schedule does not apply to 8-week courses. Final examinations in these classes are to be given during the last class meeting at the regular class time and in the usual classroom.
  3. Examinations will be held in the regular classroom unless students are otherwise notified. 4. When students have three or more final examinations on the same day, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the last exam or exams scheduled on that day. When students have two final exams scheduled to meet at the same time, they are entitled to arrange an alternative examination time for the later course offered that day or week. Such arrangements must be made by the in the tenth week of the semester. Students should make arrangements with the instructor of the affected course and are expected to provide evidence of these situations to qualify for exceptions. 5. Rationale must be provided to the appropriate Associate Dean if a final examination is not being administered.

The Registrar is responsible for scheduling all final examination dates, times, and rooms. The Registrar will post the final exam schedule on Blackboard.

Grade Appeal Policy and Procedures

Updated 6/24/16

The Grade Appeal Policy provides students with an avenue of redress when a final course grade is in question based on a mathematical error or grading that does not coincide with the published grading policy in the course syllabus. The procedures for appealing a final course grade are outlined below.

Procedures

Informal Appeal

A student who believes a final grade is improper should schedule an appointment to discuss this concern with the course instructor (or the Associate Dean in the instructor’s absence) within two (2) business days of the posting of the final course grade. This meeting is a pre-requisite to filing a formal grade appeal. The course instructor is required to make a good faith attempt to meet with a student who has contacted him/her to discuss a concern with a grade within three business days of when the grade was posted. Reasons for delay should be explained and documented. The course instructor should also document the meeting when it occurs.

Formal Appeal

If, after the discussion with the course instructor, a student decides to appeal the final grade, the following are the steps for the formal appeal process:

  1. Within four (4) business days after final grades are posted by the Registrar’s Office, the student will submit written appeal documentation to the Associate Dean of the Department including a statement of the reason for the appeal, previous steps taken with the course instructor to resolve the issue, and evidence supporting the student’s assertion that the grade is improper. To be considered, the grade appeal must claim one or both of the following reasons:

a. The final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus.

b. There is an alleged mathematical error in calculating the final course grade.

It is the student’s responsibility and burden to show that the final course grade conflicts with the grading policy per the course syllabus and/or there is a mathematical error in calculating the final course grade. Students are advised that the professional judgment of course instructors cannot be challenged and appeals made solely on that basis will not be considered.

  1. Upon receiving the written appeal documentation, the Associate Dean will notify the student of receipt of the appeal. The Associate Dean will then determine if the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1. If the appeal has not been timely filed and/or has not been properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the appeal will be dismissed and will not be heard and the student will be notified of such in writing. If the appeal has been timely and properly filed according to the standards in Section 1, the student will be notified that the appeal will be reviewed and also provided an explanation of these procedures.

Evidence of difficulties in arranging the initial meeting with the course instructor may be reason for the Associate Dean to forgive the untimely filing of an appeal, so long as the student made efforts to file the appeal in a reasonable amount of time after he or she was able to meet with the course instructor.

  1. The Associate Dean will send the named course instructor a copy of the student’s appeal documents so a response can be submitted. The instructor will be asked to provide appropriate documentation by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day of the request. Documents to be submitted include a description of the grading and evaluation process for the course (including the syllabus if separate), documentation of the informal grade appeal meeting, and any other documentation or rationale deemed important.
  2. The Associate Dean will provide the student with a copy of the course instructor’s response and other documentation provided and allow the student an opportunity to provide any additional information by a specified date, usually within one (1) business day.
  3. Once the course instructor has provided a response and other information and the student has had an opportunity to provide additional information, the Associate Dean will establish an appeals file of all correspondence and materials related to the appeal to be reviewed by the committee as discussed below.
  4. The Associate Dean will then appoint a committee of three (3) faculty members within the department. In constructing the committee, possible conflicts of interest should be considered and addressed.
  5. The Associate Dean will determine with the committee a date for a review of the appeal within two (2) weeks of establishing an appeals file. The appeals file will be provided to the committee at the meeting for review, discussion, and the creation of a written recommendation regarding the grade appeal.
  6. Following the meeting, the committee’s recommendation will be forwarded to the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean will notify the course instructor and the student of the recommendation in writing within one (1) business day.

Upon consideration of the committee’s recommendation, the ultimate decision to change a grade is made by the course instructor. The course instructor should notify the Associate Dean, Program Director, and student of the decision in writing within two (2) business days of receiving the committee’s recommendation. If the grade is to be changed, the Registrar should also be notified. The course instructor’s decision at this stage is final, and there is no further appeal available unless the failing grade has resulted in the student’s academic dismissal from the College.

Final Appeal in Cases Resulting in Dismissal

If a student’s failing grade remains in place following a grade appeal and the failing grade will result in dismissal from the program, the student may make a final appeal to the Chief Academic Officer (CAO) of the College. This appeal should include a short written statement explaining the appeal and attaching all previous appeal documents. This appeal must be filed with the CAO within three (3) business days after receipt of the course instructor’s final decision. The CAO may take any action he/she deems is appropriate under the circumstances of the case and will make a decision within five (5) business days of receiving the appeal, unless circumstances require a lengthier time frame. If the time frame is to be extended, the student and the involved course instructor will be notified in writing. The decision of the CAO is final. Appropriate parties, including the student, will be notified in writing of the CAO’s decision within three (3) business days of the decision being made.

**GRADE APPEAL TIMELINE **

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